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The Spoonbill, Vol. 47, No. 9, October 1998
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The Spoonbill, Vol. 47, No. 9, October 1998 - Image 3. October 1998. Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries. University of Houston Digital Library. Web. June 18, 2021. https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/2007_023/item/4381/show/4379.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

(October 1998). The Spoonbill, Vol. 47, No. 9, October 1998 - Image 3. Outdoor Nature Club Newsletters. Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries. Retrieved from https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/2007_023/item/4381/show/4379

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

The Spoonbill, Vol. 47, No. 9, October 1998 - Image 3, October 1998, Outdoor Nature Club Newsletters, Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries, accessed June 18, 2021, https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/2007_023/item/4381/show/4379.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

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Title The Spoonbill, Vol. 47, No. 9, October 1998
Contributor (LCNAF)
  • Carey, Damien F.
Publisher Outdoor Nature Club
Date October 1998
Subject.Topical (LCSH)
  • Ornithology
Subject.Geographic (TGN)
  • Houston, Texas
Genre (AAT)
  • newsletters
  • periodicals
Language English
Type (DCMI)
  • Text
Original Item Location ID 2007-023, Box 12, Folder 23
ArchivesSpace URI /repositories/2/archival_objects/9883
Original Collection Outdoor Nature Club Records
Digital Collection Outdoor Nature Club Newsletters
Digital Collection URL http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/2007_023
Repository Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries
Repository URL http://libraries.uh.edu/branches/special-collections/
Use and Reproduction In Copyright
File Name index.cpd
Item Description
Title Image 3
Format (IMT)
  • image/jpeg
File Name uhlib_2007_023_b012_f023_009_003.jpg
Transcript News, Notes st Announcements recovery plan inclusive of population objectives and monitoring guidelines. Additionally, seven regional groups were formed consisting of more than 300 community representatives across the Southwest including ranchers, envi- ionmentalrepresentatives, waterand power interests, state and federal land managers, and local governments. The problem of riparian habitat loss, which adversely affects many different species, is widespread throughout the Southwest due to urban development, hydrologic modification such as dams, diversions and groundwater overdraft, and overgrazing by domestic livestock. The southwestern willow flycatcher also contends with brood parasitic brown-headed cowbirds. Cowbirds lay their eggs in the nests of other birds which expend parental care on the young cowbirds at the expense of their own young, reducing nesting success of birds like the southwestern willow flycatcher. Movin' On Up The Texas Bird Records Committee (TBRC) held its annual meeting on October 03, 1998 making major decisions on the following specie: Tropical Kingbird: no longer a Review Species. There exist a documented permanent population in Brownsville for at least 10 years. Clay-Colored Robin: no longer a Review Species. Despite a drop in records in the late Eighties, this species has been more-or-less resident in the LRGV for the last ten years. Eurasian Collared-Dove: accepted onto the State List as an Introduced species - it is not a Review species as there are already records from 30+ counties, with breeding recorded from 7 counties. Black Swift: added to the Presumptive List with the acceptance of a 1985 sight record. These changes bring the Texas State List to 610 species in good standing. "Do-Nothings" Act Millions of fishand wildlife enthusiasts including Teaming with Wildlife (TWW) supporters hailed the introduction of The Conservation and Reinvestment Act (CRA) of 1998 in the U.S. House of Representatives, H.R. 4717 and in the Senate, the Reinvestment and Environmental Restora tion Act (RERA) of 1998, S. 2566. CRA and RERA will provide funding for three purposes: Title I is for coastal impact assistance; Title II is for land based recreation, Title III is for wildlife conservation. Under Title III, the new legislation directs funds to states to help conserve wildlife populations and their habitats and to provide more opportunities for wildlife education and recreation. House original sponsors include Southeast Texas Congressman Nicholas Lampson (D-TX). Absent from the sponsor list in the U.S. Senate were our Texas senators. Both bills, in their Title III sections, dedicate a percentage of federal offshore oil and gas revenues to states for wildlife programs. The House bill dedicates 10% and the Senate bill dedicates 7% for wildlife conservation purposes with the total oil and gas revenues expected to be $4-5 billion in the years ahead. Sportfish and game populations across America have been restored through funds provided by hunters and anglers by license fees and user fees in the form of excise taxes under the Federal Aid in Wildlife and Sport Fish Restoration Program (commonly-Known as the Pittman- Robertson and Dingell-Johnson/Wallop- Breaux Acts). Many of the nation's leading conservation organizations spearheaded Teaming with Wildlife in an effort to fund important wildlife conservation, recreation and education programs through a modest surcharge on outdoor equipment such as camping gear and binoculars. More than 3,000 conservation organizations and related businesses support this grassroots effort. While the Conservation and Reinvestment Act and Reinvestment and Environmental Restoration Act have a different revenue source than originally proposed by the Teaming with Wildlife coalition, the funding will be used for the same purposes. OG members can contact their Congressman and Senators in support both bills. For more information on Title III of these just introduced Acts, contact the International Association of Fish and Wildlife Agencies at (202) 624-7890 or email teaming@sso.org or check the Teaming with Wildlife web site at http:// www.teaming.com. Belize Bound The 1999 OG field trip to Belize will be February 13 (Saturday) to February 21 (Sunday), 1999. We will divide our time between the Crooked Tree Sanctuary and the Cockscomb Basin Sanctuary. The trip begins at the Crooked Tree Sanctuary at the Paradise Inn. The Crooked Tree Sanctuary and village is located on an island in the middle of a large freshwater lake. The Paradise Inn is located right on the shore of the Crooked Tree lagoon. It offers cabins with ceiling fans, hot showers, and private baths. Meals are Belizian Creole and are served family style. I've never left the table hungry. I've got two boat trips planned at Crooked Tree. The first, is down Spanish Creek where we'll hope to find Boat-billed Herons, Gray-necked Wood-Rails, Pygmy Kingfishers, and Limpkin. We'll make a special effort to find the rare Agami Heron. The second boat trip will be down the New River to the Lamani Mayan Ruins. We should find Citroline Trogran, Collared Arcari, and Howler Monkeys at Lamani. The birding is very good in Crooked Tree Village to, we should see Jabiru, Black- collared Hawk, and Snail Kite right from the Paradise Inn. After Crooked Tree, we'll bird our way south to Mayan Center and the Cockscomb Sanctuary. The Cockscomb Sanctuary is an over 300 square mile basin protected for jaguars. I expect to find White- collared and Red-capped Manikin, Keel- billed Toucan, and Royal Flycatcher here. I also hope to make a trip to Red Bank to see the large roost of Scarlet Macaws. At Cockscomb we'll stay in the dorms at the sanctuary and eat at the H'men Hotel nearby. Most of our birding will be done from a boat at Crooked Tree, and while all day "Death Marches" are possible, you don't have to walk far to find birds in Belize. I expect with ten participants that we will see better than 300 species of birds. I await final airfare from Houston. Don't expect the cost of the trip to be over $1,200. That includes airfare, all lodging, vehicle rental, and most meals. You must cover incidentals, sanctuary entrance fees, and a couple of meals out of pocket. You need a passport to travel to Belize. Arrangements have been made by Wildside Nature Tours & Adventure Camera (888) 875-9453. If you have specific questions contact David Sarkozi, 713-520-5906 or dsarkozi@flash.net