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The Spoonbill, Vol. 52, No. 2, February 2003
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The Spoonbill, Vol. 52, No. 2, February 2003 - Image 3. February 2003. Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries. University of Houston Digital Library. Web. June 23, 2021. https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/2007_023/item/4344/show/4338.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

(February 2003). The Spoonbill, Vol. 52, No. 2, February 2003 - Image 3. Outdoor Nature Club Newsletters. Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries. Retrieved from https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/2007_023/item/4344/show/4338

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

The Spoonbill, Vol. 52, No. 2, February 2003 - Image 3, February 2003, Outdoor Nature Club Newsletters, Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries, accessed June 23, 2021, https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/2007_023/item/4344/show/4338.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

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Title The Spoonbill, Vol. 52, No. 2, February 2003
Contributor (Local)
  • Haddican, Mary Pat
Publisher Outdoor Nature Club
Date February 2003
Subject.Topical (LCSH)
  • Ornithology
Subject.Geographic (TGN)
  • Houston, Texas
Genre (AAT)
  • newsletters
  • periodicals
Language English
Type (DCMI)
  • Text
Original Item Location ID 2007-023, Box 13, Folder 9
ArchivesSpace URI /repositories/2/archival_objects/9888
Original Collection Outdoor Nature Club Records
Digital Collection Outdoor Nature Club Newsletters
Digital Collection URL http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/2007_023
Repository Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries
Repository URL http://libraries.uh.edu/branches/special-collections/
Use and Reproduction In Copyright
File Name index.cpd
Item Description
Title Image 3
Format (IMT)
  • image/jpeg
File Name uhlib_2007_023_b013_f009_002_003.jpg
Transcript Chairman's Message As we all are aware, the loss of natural habitat for many bird species is occurring at an enormous rate. Many of you ask me, "What can I do? I am only one person." I believe that as individuals we can make a difference. Your favorite places are often under pressure from developers, governments and others who do not share your love of nature and the wonderful bird species that inhabit these areas. To many people, the areas that you consider prime birding habitat are considered as simply junk acreage that needs to be improved for human use. First, we can keep informed. Ihere are numerous sources to keep aware of the many threats to habitat loss. We usually discuss some at each OG meeting. The Internet is a place to find almost anything if you are willing to search deeply. As you try to keep aware of the many various threats occurring both locally and nationally, I suggest that you pay particular concern about areas that are dear to you. Second, we must be vocal. Write or call the government officials that will be the decision makers. Let them know that you want them to preserve and even expand habitat. Third, adopt one or more of these areas as your special place and find Out all you can about its current and future needs. Become a volunteer to help maintain its current status as a bird habitat, to improve it, and finally to defend it from all who would damage or eliminate it By focusing on one or just a few areas, the task will not seem as daunting as trying to be in- - volved with every attack on habitat we hear o£ Fourth, after you have focused on your own areas, support the call from others when their areas are under attack. Again let your views be known. Add your voice to those Working hard to protect their favorite place. This way, we can add the power of many to the singular crises. Fifth, provide a habitat of your own in your backyard. Whether it is big or smalt it is important to provide as much habitat as possible. Most of you know that you can provide a modest sanctuary in even the smallest of yards. And as our latest speaker, Kathy Adams Clark, showed, there will be wonderful opportunities to view and photograph birds in your own yard. Providing sanctuary can be done by providing a water source, shelter, and food. Each of these elements can range from very simple to highly complex. A water source can be an elevated shallow bird bath or an elaborate fountain with water cascading over rocks and many things in between.. A small fountain with a water drip or a mister can bring a multitude of birds to Program and Field Trip Schedule January February 6 - Meeting - Steve Matherly—Birds of South Africa 25 - Field Trip - West Harris County 24-26 - Quarterly Field Trip - Rio Grande Valley March April May 3 - Meeting - Kathy Adams Clark - Photographing Birds in the Backyard 15 - Field Trip - Brazos Bend 2 - Meeting - Birds of S. California (note change) 25 -i Field Trip - Texas City Preserve 29 - Field Trip - Texas City Preserve 7—Meeting - Kelly Bryan - Davis Mountain Birding 19 - Field Trip - Anahuac/High Island 25-27 - Quarterly Field Trip: Choke Canyon 5 - Meeting - OG 50th Birthday Party 17 - Field Trip — Quintana/Brazoria Area Dues are due! 2003 dues must be paid to remain on the Spoonbill mailing list after this issue. your yard, even in downtown Houston. Shelter can be provided by trees and bushes with enough foliage to allow the birds to hide from predators. Using native plants is a good idea to provide shelter. Native plants require much less maintenance than non- native plants and the birds have evolved with these plants making them more suited for the local birds. Finally, food sources can vary. Native plants can also provide sources of food for local birds species for which they are adapted. Food can also be supplied through various types of feeders providing different types of food. There are many things that we can do as individuals to help to maintain, to protect, and to restore the habitats the will help our birds survive. But, it falls on each of use to commit to doing something. We cannot depend on others to protect the feathered creatures we find so alluring. — Skip Almoney