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The Spoonbill, Vol. 38, No. 6 - 7, June - July 1989
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The Spoonbill, Vol. 38, No. 6 - 7, June - July 1989 - Image 4. June 1989 - July 1989. Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries. University of Houston Digital Library. Web. September 26, 2021. https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/2007_023/item/4332/show/4325.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

(June 1989 - July 1989). The Spoonbill, Vol. 38, No. 6 - 7, June - July 1989 - Image 4. Outdoor Nature Club Newsletters. Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries. Retrieved from https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/2007_023/item/4332/show/4325

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

The Spoonbill, Vol. 38, No. 6 - 7, June - July 1989 - Image 4, June 1989 - July 1989, Outdoor Nature Club Newsletters, Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries, accessed September 26, 2021, https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/2007_023/item/4332/show/4325.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

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Title The Spoonbill, Vol. 38, No. 6 - 7, June - July 1989
Alternative Title The Spoonbill, Vol. XXXVIII, No. 6 - 7, June - July 1989
Contributor (Local)
  • Price, Libby
Publisher Outdoor Nature Club
Date June 1989 - July 1989
Subject.Topical (LCSH)
  • Ornithology
Subject.Geographic (TGN)
  • Houston, Texas
Genre (AAT)
  • newsletters
  • periodicals
Language English
Type (DCMI)
  • Text
Original Item Location ID 2007-023, Box 12, Folder 5
ArchivesSpace URI /repositories/2/archival_objects/9874
Original Collection Outdoor Nature Club Records
Digital Collection Outdoor Nature Club Newsletters
Digital Collection URL http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/2007_023
Repository Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries
Repository URL http://libraries.uh.edu/branches/special-collections/
Use and Reproduction In Copyright
File Name index.cpd
Item Description
Title Image 4
Format (IMT)
  • image/jpeg
File Name uhlib_2007_023_b012_f005_006_004.jpg
Transcript FUNDING FOR LOWER RIO GRANDE NWR (From U.S. Fish and Wildlife News Release) Department' of the Interior Secretary Manuel Lujan has asked Congress for $141 million to acquire land in 27 states and 2 territories. Of this amount $10 million will go to the Lower Rio Grande Valley National Wildlife Refuge at Alamo, Texas...to purchase land for wildlife habitat in Star, Hidalgo, Willacy and Cameron counties. Established in 1980, the refuge has grown to 39,740 acres, and the refuge was acquired for the protection of what has come to be known as "The Wildlife Corridor." The refuge is part of a plan to preserve tracts of interconnected habitat...[and]...strives to protect 11 different natural habitat types. These habitats not only serve to reflect the natural diversity of the area, but also hold the key to survival for more than 145 unique wildlife species of special management concern, most of which are listed as endangered, threatened, or occur only peripherally in the U.S. from Mexico. JAMES BOND, ORNITHOLOGIST, 89; FLEMING ADOPTED NAME FOR 007 [Obit from The New York Times] Philadelphia, Feb. 16 (AP) James Bond, a leading ornithologist whose name was adopted by Ian Fleming for the fictional British agent 007, died at Chestnut Hill Hospital Tuesday. He was 89 years old and lived in Philadelphia. Mr. Bond, a native of Philadelphia and graduate of Cambridge University, was a former curator of ornithology at the Academy of Natural Sciences in Philadelphia. He was the leading authority on birds of the West Indies for more than half a century and is best known among scientists for proving that birds of the Caribbean originated in North America, not South America. Mr. Bond's contribution to popular culture came after World War II when Ian Fleming saw his book, "Birds of the West Indies," in Jamaica. Mr. Fleming, an avid bird watcher, was writing a thriller at the time and adopted the ornithologist's name for the dashing character later portrayed in films by Sean Connery, Roger Moore and other actors. Mr. Fleming wrote years later to Mr. Bond's wife, Mary Fanning Wickham Bond: "It struck me that this brief, unromantic, Anglo-Saxon and yet very masculine name was just what I needed, and so a second James Bond was born." ..."In return," he wrote, "I can only offer you or James Bond the unlimited use of the name Ian Fleming for any purposes you may think fit. Perhaps one day your husband will discover a particularly horrible species of bird which he would like to christen in an insulting fashion by calling it Ian Fleming." Mr. Fleming died in 1964. Mr. Bond made his first scientific expedition in 1925 when he traveled up the Amazon River. He visited more than 100 Caribbean islands, collected 294 of the 300 bird species living there and wrote more than 100 books and scientific papers on Caribbean birds. Among his honors were the Musgrave Medal from the Institute of Jamaica in 1952; the Brewster Medal, the highest honor of the American Ornithologists' Union, in 1954; and the Leidy Medal of the Academy of Natural Sciences in 1975. Mr. Bond is survived by his wife; a stepdaughter Mary Eiseman, and six stepgrandchildren. THE CHAIRMAN'S MESSAGE It's a real treat being Chairman of the OG at this point in time. I'm grateful for the opportunity to serve in this 1989/90 season. It seems momentous, entering the last decade of a century (a speculation, never having crossed this bridge before ). As the months pass, please do let me know of any suggestions you have that may improve our group's activities or our image in the community. I am open to compliments from any quarter as well. Criticisms may be given to John Buckman, our Co-Chairman; Jerry Patrick, our Treasurer; or Ronnie Carrol, our Secretary. These will be accepted at an as yet undetermined location south of the intersection of Hwys. 124 and 87, on the first Sunday following the last Monday of odd-numbered months. I'm not really an old hand at birding. In 1973 looking at a bird through binoculars seemed like wasted time to me. Things have surely changed since then! Sometimes I wonder if there are really so many birdwatchers or if my consciousness has expanded to include more of y'all. Statistics say we are a rapidly growing market. Funny how people creating statistics always think in terms of markets. And when it comes to folks interested in birding, we, the OG, are a very marketable service. We are blessed in the Greater Houston area to have many dynamic organizations and talented people with tremendously varied interests within our reach. In this patchwork, making the quilt that is our culture, the OG enjoys a unique place. Our members represent the whole spectrum of interests in ornithology—from novices to those whose work is an aid to the professionaL We have busybody members (like me) and others who come to one meeting or field trip a year. Yet one thing we all share in common, a loving appreciation and concern for our avian neighbors and visitors. Another is the desire to grow in our understanding of the birds, their habits and their habitats. I would like to thank Ed Rozenburg for the fine job he did last year as Chairman. Continuing publicity efforts Ed initiated last season, we will be doing more to let people know who and what we are. Your help is very much wanted with this in two ways: First make a suggestion on reaching members of the public who have an interest in birds or birding. Call Barbara Hoffman at 480-6159 or John Buckman at 359-4685 to talk about it. There are too many birders who have never heard of us. Second, and most important, when you see people at an OG function that you do not know, make an effort—introduce yourself! If they are visitors or new members, welcome them! You remember what it feels like to be a stranger in a strange place. So is there a stranger place than a gathering of birdwatchers? Come to our new meeting place on August 1, and see for yourself. Richard Uzar, Chairman