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The Spoonbill, Vol. 19, No. 5, September 1970
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The Spoonbill, Vol. 19, No. 5, September 1970 - Image 1. September 1970. Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries. University of Houston Digital Library. Web. May 14, 2021. https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/2007_023/item/4279/show/4273.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

(September 1970). The Spoonbill, Vol. 19, No. 5, September 1970 - Image 1. Outdoor Nature Club Newsletters. Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries. Retrieved from https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/2007_023/item/4279/show/4273

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

The Spoonbill, Vol. 19, No. 5, September 1970 - Image 1, September 1970, Outdoor Nature Club Newsletters, Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries, accessed May 14, 2021, https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/2007_023/item/4279/show/4273.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

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Title The Spoonbill, Vol. 19, No. 5, September 1970
Alternative Title The Spoonbill, Vol. XVIV, No. 5, September 1970
Contributor (Local)
  • Lefkovits, David
  • Lefkovits, Dorothy
Publisher Outdoor Nature Club
Date September 1970
Subject.Topical (LCSH)
  • Ornithology
Subject.Geographic (TGN)
  • Houston, Texas
Genre (AAT)
  • newsletters
  • periodicals
Language English
Type (DCMI)
  • Text
Original Item Location ID 2007-023, Box 10, Folder 7
ArchivesSpace URI /repositories/2/archival_objects/9855
Original Collection Outdoor Nature Club Records
Digital Collection Outdoor Nature Club Newsletters
Digital Collection URL http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/2007_023
Repository Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries
Repository URL http://libraries.uh.edu/branches/special-collections/
Use and Reproduction No Copyright - United States
Note Incorrect volume number, XVIV, printed on front page.
File Name index.cpd
Item Description
Title Image 1
Format (IMT)
  • image/jpeg
File Name uhlib_2007_023_b010_f007_009_001.jpg
Transcript _3 less _fc__a VOLUME XVIV, Ho. 5 September, 1970 PUBLISHED BY THE ORNITHOLOGY GROUP, OUTDOOR HATURE CLUB, HOUSTON, TEXAS SWALLOWTAILED KITES by Bessie G. Cornelius Two Swallowtailed Kites were sighted on August 18 three miles west of Eastex Freeway on Sour Lake Road #105, by Dr. Howard Mackay and son Tiger of Beaumont. Jo Sims of Orange, two young enthusiastic birders, Bob Mann and Roger 0''Fiel and I went to the area at 11 AM the next day and found four of them hawking over a cutover grain field. We watched them for more than 30 minutes and until they dipped down into a line of trees along Pine Island Bayou. Needless to say the 12 year old boys were walking on air after seeing these handsome creatures perform so gracefully. In cheeking the records I do not find an August sighting for Swallowtails in this area, AUGUST BIRDING ON THE REFUGE by Jane Dodge Birding with Jo Chelf at the Anahuac National Wildlife Refuge on August 14 yielded a surprisingly large number of birds including the pectoral and least sandpipers, the long- billed curlew, horned lark, and a cliff swallow perched on a fence among others listed as common and abundant on the refuge. On a return trip with Margret Dodge and Bob Simmons on August 23, we saw eleven beautiful wood ibis, pectoral, least, spotted, and western sandpipers, barn and tree swallows. We had a good look at a purple gallinule with a chic, a total of 46 species for the last trip. A 1ETTER FROM JOE M. HEISER, Jr, The Spoonbill, August 1970, published John S. Gottschalk's thought-provoking statement that Spanish moss - majestic ancient drapery of Southern landscapes - is threatened with extinction over much of its range. The same sad story has been repeated about some species of cacti, the small hole-nesting birds, the pelican, the leopard and the polar bear, the Texas red wolf, the box turtle, the alligator, certain species of whales and other marine life, various geographic features such as estauries, and many, many other items not to be classed as expendable by an honorable stewardship. Our environmental responsibility includes issues so complex and varied that there is need for every instrument of imagination, techical skill, personal involvement and organized effort that can be brought to bear upon them. This was recognized, in earlier days of the Oudoor Nature Club, by numerous and continuous activities, among them (to name a few) cooperation in safeguarding coastal bird coloniess pioneer advocacy of Big Bend and Big Thicket parksr campaigns in behalf of holly, dogwood and other native plants endangered by vandalisms sponsorship of tree-planting, public science fairs, nature poetry contests, art and photography exhibits) and other projects to arouse more active interest in our natural resources and their provident administration. Accumulated files record the effective relations between Outdoor Nature Club leadership and public officials in every category. Among the results of this spirit of mutual rega-d and collaboration was the planning and passage of constructive legislation without which senseless exploitation and pollution would have mocked the hopes of dependency on voluntary self-control. Reversal of policies so strongly sanctioned by precedent, tradition and avowed purpose would cast all nature hobbyistis in the role of modern Neroes fiddling at their diversions while the universe about them is gutted by fires of neglect and abuse.