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The Spoonbill, Vol. 23, No. 9, January 1975
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The Spoonbill, Vol. 23, No. 9, January 1975 - Image 1. January 1975. Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries. University of Houston Digital Library. Web. May 11, 2021. https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/2007_023/item/4168/show/4154.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

(January 1975). The Spoonbill, Vol. 23, No. 9, January 1975 - Image 1. Outdoor Nature Club Newsletters. Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries. Retrieved from https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/2007_023/item/4168/show/4154

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

The Spoonbill, Vol. 23, No. 9, January 1975 - Image 1, January 1975, Outdoor Nature Club Newsletters, Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries, accessed May 11, 2021, https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/2007_023/item/4168/show/4154.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

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Title The Spoonbill, Vol. 23, No. 9, January 1975
Alternative Title The Spoonbill, Vol. XXIII, No. 9, January 1975
Contributor (Local)
  • Jones, Margaret
Publisher Outdoor Nature Club
Date January 1975
Subject.Topical (LCSH)
  • Ornithology
Subject.Geographic (TGN)
  • Houston, Texas
Genre (AAT)
  • newsletters
  • periodicals
Language English
Type (DCMI)
  • Text
Original Item Location ID 2007-023, Box 10, Folder 22
ArchivesSpace URI /repositories/2/archival_objects/9860
Original Collection Outdoor Nature Club Records
Digital Collection Outdoor Nature Club Newsletters
Digital Collection URL http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/2007_023
Repository Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries
Repository URL http://libraries.uh.edu/branches/special-collections/
Use and Reproduction No Copyright - United States
File Name index.cpd
Item Description
Title Image 1
Format (IMT)
  • image/jpeg
File Name uhlib_2007_023_b010_f022_001_001.jpg
Transcript z Volume XXIII, No. 9 January, 1975 PUBLISHED BY THE ORNITHOLOGY GROUP, OUTDOOR HATURE CLUB, HOUSTOH. TEXAS HE WILL BE MISSED ***!&-. Clayton Gilman, an active and long-time member of ONC, died last month, after a short illness. A man of wide ranging interests, he was ever agreeable to share his knowledge with anyone who asked. He was known to many as the leader of the bus trips ' ■ made by ONC in recent years. And when he was on a field trip, he always "brought up the rear" to be sure no one got left or lost. Clayton's love of botany and birds made the readers of THE SPOONBILL richer over the years thrdugli his advice on attracting birds to the' yard by plantings. Following are some of his ideas- on "Nature's bird feeders", which he had sent to THE SPOONBILL several weeks before his death. "Trees are for the birds* Well, not all of them, but two come to mind- that particularly fit that description. Of all trees grown, it seems to me that the red mulberry (Morus Rubra) attracts more birds of more species than any other tree. Not only is it favored by those birds which delight in the fruit, but the fruit and leaves being also attractants of insects of many kinds, the insect-eating birds find a well-laden lunch table. Incidentally, mulberry pie is mighty good.fare for humans. "Another favorite of seed-eating birds is the hackberry (Celtis-Occidentalis) which Is especially attractive to cardinal, phoebe, cedar waxwing, mockingbird, bluebird and brown thrasher. The hackberry is an interesting tree in appearance and, having small leaves, does not require as much housekeeping as some other ornamentals. "This section of our country is fortunate for its compatibility with the growing of a number of holly (Ilex) species, all of which furnish food for an many as 45 species of birds, including quail, flicker, waxwing, catbird, thrushes and robin. Native ; hollies include American (I. opaca), Yaupon (I. vomitoria), Georgia (I. longlpes), Carolina (I. ambiqua), deciduous or possum-haw (I.,.Decidua), and Inkberry (I. Glabra). Introduced varieties include Dahoon (I. cassine), Chinese (I. cornuta) and Burford (I. cornuta car. Burfordi). The English hollies are beautiful plants but do not appear to like our climate. "It must be borne In mind that hollies are dioecious, that is, male and female flowers are borne on separate plants. Only the female (Pistillate) plants bear fruits, so there must be one or two male plants in the vicinity for fertilization. There is no way to distinguish between the .sexes prior to flowering. All those mentioned except Georgia, Carolina and deciduous are evergreen and are very desirable plants for landscaping. The deciduous varieties make a fine fhowing until the birds find them when they suddenly become completely bare." Clayton Gilman will indeed be missed. A SHRINKING COLONY Our Bellaire colony of Ringed Turtle Doves has diminished quite a bit, it seems. When we started watching this group, in 1973, some 13 to 15 birds could be accounted for. As reported previously, some have moved out of the immediate area. We found out last week from a neighbor, who has been closely observing them, that at least 3 birds were killed by cars, at least 2 by cats, and 1 by a dog. (X myself, once, had to stop my car, get out, and shoo a bird out of the street, before proceeding. - Ed.) In spite of the fact that some of these birds nested and produced young, we, at this time, can find only 3 In the original area, and 2 a few blocks away. The unwarlness of birds, historically cage-bred, seems to be a very large factor in an inability to establish and thrive in the wild. r '*