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The Bulletin, No. 7, Second Series, Sping 1935
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The Bulletin, No. 7, Second Series, Sping 1935 - Image 4. Spring 1935. Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries. University of Houston Digital Library. Web. September 15, 2019. https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/2007_023/item/4142/show/4141.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

(Spring 1935). The Bulletin, No. 7, Second Series, Sping 1935 - Image 4. Outdoor Nature Club Newsletters. Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries. Retrieved from https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/2007_023/item/4142/show/4141

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

The Bulletin, No. 7, Second Series, Sping 1935 - Image 4, Spring 1935, Outdoor Nature Club Newsletters, Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries, accessed September 15, 2019, https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/2007_023/item/4142/show/4141.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

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Title The Bulletin, No. 7, Second Series, Sping 1935
Contributor (Local)
  • Heiser, Joseph M., Jr.
Publisher Outdoor Nature Club
Date Spring 1935
Subject.Topical (LCSH)
  • Ornithology
Subject.Geographic (TGN)
  • Houston, Texas
Genre (AAT)
  • newsletters
  • periodicals
Language English
Type (DCMI)
  • Text
Original Item Location ID 2007-023, Box 14, Folder 30
ArchivesSpace URI /repositories/2/archival_objects/9625
Original Collection Outdoor Nature Club Records
Digital Collection Outdoor Nature Club Newsletters
Digital Collection URL http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/2007_023
Repository Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries
Repository URL http://libraries.uh.edu/branches/special-collections/
Use and Reproduction No Copyright - United States
File Name index.cpd
Item Description
Title Image 4
Format (IMT)
  • image/jpeg
File Name uhlib_2007_023_b014_f030_006_004.jpg
Transcript Page 4 THE OUTDOOR NATURE CLUB OF HOUSTON, TEXAS Spring, 1935 Mid-February Hike San Jacinto River By ADA S. REEVES Nature lovers know that a threatening day in the city with drizzle, with sloppy, cheerless streets, has a different aspect in the woods. The pine needles, the dead grass and leaves do not suggest sloppi- ness, and even the drizzle seems absorbed by the trees. We may miss the sunshine, but many a treetop glints with the golden rays of the yellow jasmine. There is warmth in the glow of red maple keys against the gray moss. In many places the violets are thick under foot and their bits of blue substitute for the absent blue overhead. White asters (leftovers from fall) and dainty bluets are answering the spring roll call. With most trees bare, the smilax vines of several varieties are conspicuous: the green briar, the stretchberry smilax, the true Southern smilax with thick clusters of berries; also the cross vine, the honeysuckle, the bamboo, the wisteria, and the grapevine. The Texas redbud, with its red-purple glow, is as thrilling as a blush on a charming face. We observed some relationship of the magnolia and the sweet bay tree. The leaves of the young magnolia sprouts are identical with the bay leaves. The wild peach, with its glistening green leaves, are full of delicate, tiny, white blossoms. The cypresses are laden with long, gracefully swinging catkins. The ironwood are full of short, green catkins not yet developed. A species of water lilies, some bulbs of which we picked up last fall, have leaves eight to ten inches high shooting up from the water. A member of the Outdoor Nature Club has them half as high growing in a bowl of sand and water in her sunny dining room. The trained eye, assisted by field glasses, could catch sight of many birds; some robins not yet making their northern flight; the myrtle warbler, red-bellied woodpecker, bluejay, mockingbird, cardinal, bluebird, chipping sparrow, vireo, thrasher, titmouse, kingfisher, kinglet and others. Outdoor good manners suggest culture and refinement just as much as parlor manners. The way we treat our fellow men, the way we conduct ourselves in the presence of others, tells what we are even more distinctly than words. Courtesy is a mental attitude that works itself out in small acts as well as the regular conventions of civilized usage. But it is possible to carry our courtesy a bit further and even make it include the wild flowers and forest trees, the greenswards where we eat our picnic lunch. The beauty spots that we visit in the more secluded sections of our city parks, and even the great wild woods, deserve our care and courtesy; they attracted us; they will attract some one else; tin cans and litter can hardly be a favorable recommendation when the next party happens along. Good manners are contagious; there is an appeal to the better nature; we like to imitate cultured people. This part of Texas is a land of sunshine, singing birds and colorful flowers. Wonderful forests! Magnolias! Cypress swamps! Trailing ironwoods and paper birch that tempt our curiosity, liveoaks that invite and offer hospitality, grand old giant sycamores, leaning basswoods with tree ferns forming a lacework almost to the skyline. Life is abundant, but there is no harshness; every day is a holiday. In this enchanted garden of life, there is patience, perseverance and a calm resignation to the general scheme of things. Life lessons, the efficacy of meditation, hope, a quickening of the heart, an uplift of spirits—it is the mood of the woods. The meadowlark sings of a world full of wonder. You are awakened from dreams, and you find that dreams have been changed to truth. Tiny bluets! Scented love, perfumed romance of jewel blossoms. The English sparrow, like the poor, the noisy, the ill-mannered, we have with us always. Men have always been inclined to accept any and all good things without question, without thankfulness. The fret of spring, the swelling of buds, the pale green of tender leaves, the lisping chirp of a pine warbler, the sharp whistled "whe-euu-u" of a brown thrasher, flashing redbird, acrobatic chickadee, bare-armed sycamore and peach-tinted elm reaching into opal sky. It is Washington's birthday on Buffalo Bayou—and who would, or could, tell a lie ? Tree Planting: Dr. Bud A. Randolph The ceremony of planting a magn' tree to the memory of Dr. Bud A. 1 i^B dolph, February 16, recalled many evey in the history of the Outdoor Nature Club. Mr. Randolph was one of the organizers and third president of the club, a guiding spirit and a tireless worker when the club was small and needed optimism and encouragement and much work. Since "Magnolia Grandifolia" was Dr. Randolph's theme when he graduated from college, a magnolia seemed most fitting, and the recreation grounds the ideal spot. J. M. Heiser, Jr., was in charge of the exercises that were held in the recreation house. Brief addresses were made by Arthur Lefevre, Jr., J. W. Stiles and Miss Corinne Fonde. A marker will be placed by the tree. The Mayor and the Park Board ha'- accepted the idea of making a primi ad wild life preserve in Memorial P ™ They have chosen an ideal location. Wh_- and free from encroachments, the winding bayou has protected a tract of tangled, overgrown trees and brush that show just what the bayou was like when the first white settlers arrived. This is a wise provision; in years to come scientists and nature lovers can study at first hand the primitive first forms, just as they contend and struggle with one another in the harsh, unrelenting competition of nature in the raw. The Texas Centennial movement is getting under way again. Off to a slow start after the award to Dallas, the people of Houston, San Antonio and the many other communities who had plans and suggestions are becoming reconciled to the decision, and they are coming forward with plans for pageants and c brations at the historical locations i^B will kindle interest in these shrines . ^^ become real attractions to the many visitors who come to Texas during the Centennial period. A machine age! A speeding up of industry just tends to make work more mechanical, more tiresome, more fatiguing and less interesting—and here is a place for your hobby.