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The Bulletin, No. 7, Second Series, Sping 1935
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The Bulletin, No. 7, Second Series, Sping 1935 - Image 3. Spring 1935. Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries. University of Houston Digital Library. Web. November 15, 2019. https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/2007_023/item/4142/show/4140.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

(Spring 1935). The Bulletin, No. 7, Second Series, Sping 1935 - Image 3. Outdoor Nature Club Newsletters. Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries. Retrieved from https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/2007_023/item/4142/show/4140

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

The Bulletin, No. 7, Second Series, Sping 1935 - Image 3, Spring 1935, Outdoor Nature Club Newsletters, Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries, accessed November 15, 2019, https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/2007_023/item/4142/show/4140.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

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Compound Item Description
Title The Bulletin, No. 7, Second Series, Sping 1935
Contributor (Local)
  • Heiser, Joseph M., Jr.
Publisher Outdoor Nature Club
Date Spring 1935
Subject.Topical (LCSH)
  • Ornithology
Subject.Geographic (TGN)
  • Houston, Texas
Genre (AAT)
  • newsletters
  • periodicals
Language English
Type (DCMI)
  • Text
Original Item Location ID 2007-023, Box 14, Folder 30
ArchivesSpace URI /repositories/2/archival_objects/9625
Original Collection Outdoor Nature Club Records
Digital Collection Outdoor Nature Club Newsletters
Digital Collection URL http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/2007_023
Repository Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries
Repository URL http://libraries.uh.edu/branches/special-collections/
Use and Reproduction No Copyright - United States
File Name index.cpd
Item Description
Title Image 3
Format (IMT)
  • image/jpeg
File Name uhlib_2007_023_b014_f030_006_003.jpg
Transcript Spring, 1935 THE OUTDOOR NATURE CLUB OF HOUSTON, TEXAS Page 3 "Romance and Texas" By R. A. SELLE Carroll Publishing Publishing Company, Houston B Reviewed by Bess W. Scott It has been said that the native of South Texas has been saturated and steeped in the history of his native state until he is first a glamorous curiosity and then an amusing bore to visitors. Be that as it may, there is no denying that the Texan is one of the most deeply sincere persons on earth when talking or writing of his native state. And also that his is a "big" subject in every sense of the word. Thus not only Texans, but lovers of beauty and bigness and vivid word painting, will welcome "Romance and Texas," the newest of a series of volumes on the state, by R. A. Selle, Houston author, traveler and naturalist. "Romance and Texas," subtitled "A Century of Progress," was issued late in December, and will prove a practical aid to the Texas Centennial in listing "what Texas can offer in romantic history" as well as ^elightful reading to all interested in ■lis "giant of American states." With sure strokes, Mr. Selle paints in vivid canvas or in delicate limnings, highlights of Texas—a wilderness, empire of Tejas, cave dwellers and sun worshippers, haven of adventurers, a republic, state, and present vast empire of beauty and wealth and industry. From "the blue haze of the Guadalupe, across the liquid fires of the desert, through great trees with long gray whiskers, and over staked plains and boundless seas of grasslands," the author's brush of words splashes brilliant colors that form the familiar outlines that bound Texas from the Panhandle to far-flung wings on east and west and down to the slender tip that balances on the azure blue of the Gulf of Mexico. With equal verve the author writes of the vanished buffalo herds; the bluebonnets that make "turquoise seas, cobalt lakes" and their aura of legend; the nockingbird, state bird of Texas, whose Bongs of youth, of love, of adoration ^.nd ecstasy cast a spell of rapture"; the shrine of San Jacinto; old Houston; the spell of Indian summer in Texas, and other impressionistic sketches. Other subjects, treated in the same informal vein, are Texas curiosities of nature, including the horned frog; the Magic Valley at its best, "when winter comes to the Valley of Summer"; grand old historic trees of the state and more prosaic subjects, such as the "flowing wealth" of the East Texas oil fields. Tucked between chapters and divisions of the volume like treasured newspaper clippings are brief news stories of Texas events such as the Tyler rose festival, the grapefruit fiesta of the Rio Grande, and the Houston Chamber of Commerce fete of December 21 honoring Jesse H. Jones. It is this charming informality of tone and novel format that give the volume added zest. "In Texas: Places to Go and Things to See" is a chapter of practical guidance to the visitor in the state that should prove a godsend to chambers of commerce and Centennial committees. The final chapter of the book is a brief listing of writers and near-writers of the Southwest—the "near" being the reviewer's comment and not the author's. The Texas Centennial commission members and committee are also named in full.— The Houston Post, January 13. Reading Nature It is fine to return and on a familiar landscape look, If alone—or with a friend like you. Each day I find a new scenic view: Beauties of hills, trees and a leaf-filled, flowing brook. And how like nature study is the selection of a book, For one may be read and no real meaning or significance found, If the listless reader hath not with zeal An appreciation of the moral of the story unwound. An artful, unlistless soul would find or search for a clue In the unwinding thread of phantasy's cue; Or turn silently down a well-beaten path, and treasures see Of familiar story-style—sad, or gay and free. Wants too easy supplied one often hath, to live interestedly. But to read, first-hand, restful books of nature for me, Then read the pictured-style to remind me of the earthy lea. Keen living, new insight, a brighter view— These—oh, could I teach, beloved—I'd teach you! ■—Marile Lockhart. Music of singing winds! Soft sleep- music of the tall pines. A vacation land! Trout, perch, black bass, gleaming lakes, tranquil rivers, laughing brooks, flowering prairies, sighing cypress swamps, quarries of ageless granite, out-of-the-way places in Texas. It is yet possible to keep some of the wild wonderlands in their natural and primitive condition; they should never be landscaped and boulevarded, gridironed, manicured and whitewashed, and ruthlessly cheapened to attract de luxe tourists who are not in the frame of mind to meditate and appreciate profound truths of nature. Leave the house, that is more thoroughly covered with mortgages than paint, and bask in "God's green tent"; luxury, and no rent or taxes. Nothing is given for nothing in this world. With a consuming interest, time becomes a moment, and labor a delight Natural objects have curiosity, new truths, first pleasure to communicate, the thrill of the discoverer. Constructing a grapevine swing may give as much pleasure as erecting a skyscraper, when it calls out unused primitive instincts. Climbing around Mount McKinley—we did not go to the top—we encountered the strangely unreal phenomenon of purple snow. Altitude, distance and a particular angle of the source of light must be the explanation. Weird, strange, the spell of a new experience! Modern invention takes some of the novelty as well as the fierceness out of travel in wild localities; aviators say that we can expect to get a glimpse of purple snow on the Rocky Mountains whenever the light is just right. Boundless as the ocean, the great plains spread out in all directions. Hour after hour, as you travel, it is the same landscape, the same prairie hawk, wheel-, ing, careening, looking for a victim, and the same long-eared jack rabbit just getting ready to run. Genius is intensity. A yellow-jacket is a genius. Committees for 1935, as announced by the president at the February 7 business meeting, include the following: Nature Study: Ruth Beasley, chairman. Field committees: J. M. Heiser, birds; Miss Laura Anderson, insects; Miss Margaret Fitzgerald, plants; Robert Vines, grasses. Program: Mrs. Edna Minor, Miss Margaret Fitzgerald and J. M. Heiser, Jr. Coastal Bird Colonies: Alston Clapp, Sr., and J. M. Heiser, Jr. Art: Miss Tillie Schmidt, chairman; Jack I. Pullen and Miss Erna Giesecke. Outing: Robert Vines, chairman, who will announce the names of his committee. While the program of outings for the year is being considered, Mr. Vines announces that the first trip will be an attempt to see the famed yellow jessamine at its best in the big woods of the San Jacinto River bottoms, and, if possible, catch the red maple in its early stages, in the "big thicket," near Camp Bratton.