Keyword
in
Collection
Date
to
The Bulletin, No. 7, Second Series, Sping 1935
Image 2
Citation
MLA
APA
Chicago/Turabian
The Bulletin, No. 7, Second Series, Sping 1935 - Image 2. Spring 1935. Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries. University of Houston Digital Library. Web. November 13, 2019. https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/2007_023/item/4142/show/4139.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

(Spring 1935). The Bulletin, No. 7, Second Series, Sping 1935 - Image 2. Outdoor Nature Club Newsletters. Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries. Retrieved from https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/2007_023/item/4142/show/4139

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

The Bulletin, No. 7, Second Series, Sping 1935 - Image 2, Spring 1935, Outdoor Nature Club Newsletters, Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries, accessed November 13, 2019, https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/2007_023/item/4142/show/4139.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

URL
Embed Image
Compound Item Description
Title The Bulletin, No. 7, Second Series, Sping 1935
Contributor (Local)
  • Heiser, Joseph M., Jr.
Publisher Outdoor Nature Club
Date Spring 1935
Subject.Topical (LCSH)
  • Ornithology
Subject.Geographic (TGN)
  • Houston, Texas
Genre (AAT)
  • newsletters
  • periodicals
Language English
Type (DCMI)
  • Text
Original Item Location ID 2007-023, Box 14, Folder 30
ArchivesSpace URI /repositories/2/archival_objects/9625
Original Collection Outdoor Nature Club Records
Digital Collection Outdoor Nature Club Newsletters
Digital Collection URL http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/2007_023
Repository Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries
Repository URL http://libraries.uh.edu/branches/special-collections/
Use and Reproduction No Copyright - United States
File Name index.cpd
Item Description
Title Image 2
Format (IMT)
  • image/jpeg
File Name uhlib_2007_023_b014_f030_006_002.jpg
Transcript Page 2 THE OUTDOOR NATURE CLUB OF HOUSTON, TEXAS Spring, 1935 THE OUTDOOR NATURE CLUB OF HOUSTON, TEXAS Organized 1923 Affiliated, with National Association of Audubon Societies Associated Outdoor Clubs of America OUTDOOR NATURE CLUB OFFICERS FOR 1936 DR. KENNETH HARTLEY President ROBERT A. "VINES "Vice-President DR. A. J. JAMES "Vice-President J. M. HEISER, JR Corresponding Secretary MRS. ADELE HARRISON Recording Secretary MRS. EDNA MINER Treasurer L. H. DAINGERFIELD-Honorary Vice-President MISS MABEL CASSELL Parliamentarian EXECUTIVE BOARD R. A. Selle Alston Clapp, Sr. Arthur Lefevre, Jr. J. W. Stiles Res D. Frazier Jack I. Pullen Mrs. Louise Kaiser R. L. Padgett Miss Erna Gieseke Anyone interested in the objects of the Club may become a member upon presentation of signed application card, endorsed by two members and a-ccompanied by membership fee for the current calendar year. MEMBERSHIP FEES Annual Member $ 1.00 Associate Member 5.00 Life Member 50.00 Correspondence regarding this bulletin may be addressed to J. M. HEISER, JR. 1724 Kipling Street Houston, Texas . Regular meetings of the Club are held on the third! Thursday of the month at 8 p. m. in the Public Library, and it is the occasion for an edu* ' cational lecture, an exhibition of nature films, or some other formal feature intended to interest the general public. General Club outings are open to all members and to visitors who are willing to follow the few simple rules observed by all similar clubs. Arrangements depend upon such factors as available transportation, seasonal attractions at accessible points, and the wishes of Club members as developed at meetings. Special field trips are planned by groups engaged in research and conservation work, a>nd the results of these expeditions are noted in the Club's records and given due publicity. OBJECTS OF THE CLUB To make stronger the bond of friendly understanding that exists among all lovers of Nature. To study our loeal flora and fauna* and work for the preservation of all useful and interesting forms. To co-operate with other societies throughout the land in the work of conservation and observation. To encourage Nature study, tree planting, and appreciation and protection of wild life among children and adults. To encourage hiking and interest in the outdoors as a source of health and inspiration. COMMITTEE CHAIRMEN FOR 1935 Conservation: J. M. Heiser, Jr., H-8654. Art: Miss Tillie Schmidt; H-6915. Program: Mrs. Edna Miner; L-4482. Notification: Mrs. Ada Reeves; W-3535. Nature Study: Miss Ruth Beasley; H-6915. Outing: Robert Vines; W-3578. Texas-Panhandle Birds " (Continued from page 1) yon Country Club. I admire the meek, gentle manner of them, and although 'tis said they are a dainty treat to grace a dinner, I've never tasted this dear delicacy. Their wing formation, which makes a whistling noise in their short, quick flight of alarm, is very noticeable. And to their very mournful, pitying coo, some one should write a fitting symphony or tender lullaby. I wish one was never killed by a hunter. The woodland dove's four notes heard nearby are richly mellow, but farther away sound gently meek. They have red toes, and their feathers are as glossy and smooth as satin. These doves are seen but scarcely heard after wooing and nesting time, so quietly do they exist. Maybe they pass the word among themselves that now that nesting time is past—and they rear two families in succession each springtime—they are to become targets of man! The meadow lark—dear bird of the West—builds its nest in a scraggly mesa and fills the atmosphere with wonderful song. He flies before an intruder, alighting on a wire fence or the fence post, and sings a rapturous peal of melody— a song of wonderland! His breast is pale yellow and the other coloring a mottled brownish yellow. His quick note of alarm truly makes the welkin ring. The Western wood pewee has a loud, peculiar voice of rather weird power and plaintively rhythmic. The towhee, or chewink, has a light, trembling accent. He sings only for his own pleasure—a soul-song of fiery flame. About the size of a robin, with shiny black back and white specks. His breast is white with orange on either side of the white front. His head is black and the eyes red and sparkle like two rubies. The American goldfinch utters sweet notes from cottonwood trees that grow abundantly on the Palo Duro and Terra Blanca creeks. He is also known as the thistle bird or wild canary. He is about five inches long, of bright golden yellow, with a black-crowned head, wings and tail. The song is very like the tamed, caged canaries. On a green shrub it looks colorfully beautiful and is a joy to watch and hear. Only today I watched one cheerily playing and searching about in my tall lilacs. The Texas wren announces himself afar in song, while his mate listens to the notes that woo her in coaxing invitation. His individualistic, simple melody floats in unstinted joy as he sings "Dear- r-r-r!" almost constantly. His low call To a "Mocker" (Continued from page 1) corner of the Houston Museum of Pine Arts, Main Boulevard. The audience emerging from a Sunday t afternoon musicale stopped, listened and' was held spellbound. "Another concert." The throng lingered and was thrilled! Society, "on parade," rushed past; but those on foot paused. Here was a picture no artist painted, a song no musician wrote, but the invisible touch of a master hand used the palette, brush and pen. Unconcerned, the feathered songster's exquisite melodies and intricate cadenzas soared to unknown realms. The poet of the air, this wandering minstrel, the mocker, continued his song, a song without words; but, like Pippa, he, too, conveyed the message: "God's in His heaven, All's right with the world." (All rights reserved) is softly sweet and soothing, then swells out to full joy. The robin, with his flaming orangei breast and cheery song, is loved by" everyone. He doesn't build his nest here, but comes and lingers. His morning hymn ushers in a glorious day and dares the listener to say life is not full of cheer. The veery is about seven inches long and a.lovely cinnamon brown with black markings on his throat and breast. He is usually seen in the shade of shrubbery; his very bright eyes fairly sparkle, and he likes damp places. The catbird is large built and quarrelsome, and though quite temperamental, has a marvelous aria, singing softly from clumps of undergrowth of dense bushes. He is the same variety that I've often watched among the mesquites of my ranch home in Southwest Texas. His catlike mew is familiar to everyone. The scissortail here is also identical with that one of down state. A lovely pinkish white breast and long, gray, white-tipped and deeply forked tail which . he opens and shuts at will. He is the| farmer's friend, for he is a regular tyrant when warring on the ever watchful and treacherous chicken hawk. Many times I've watched the slowly retreating form of a hawk high in midair as the scissortails, fighting perhaps in trios, stabbed him with their arrow-sharp bills. Always they won their battles, returning triumphantly to sing over the victory. How like men these warriors are!