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The Spoonbill, Vol. 11, No. 1, May 1962
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The Spoonbill, Vol. 11, No. 1, May 1962 - Image 2. May 1962. Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries. University of Houston Digital Library. Web. October 29, 2020. https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/2007_023/item/391/show/384.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

(May 1962). The Spoonbill, Vol. 11, No. 1, May 1962 - Image 2. Outdoor Nature Club Newsletters. Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries. Retrieved from https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/2007_023/item/391/show/384

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

The Spoonbill, Vol. 11, No. 1, May 1962 - Image 2, May 1962, Outdoor Nature Club Newsletters, Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries, accessed October 29, 2020, https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/2007_023/item/391/show/384.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

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Compound Item Description
Title The Spoonbill, Vol. 11, No. 1, May 1962
Alternative Title The Spoonbill, Vol. XI, No. 1, May 1962
Contributor (LCNAF)
  • Snyder, Linda
Contributor (Local)
  • Snyder, Clinton
Publisher Outdoor Nature Club
Date May 1962
Subject.Topical (LCSH)
  • Ornithology
Subject.Geographic (TGN)
  • Houston, Texas
Genre (AAT)
  • newsletters
  • periodicals
Language English
Type (DCMI)
  • Text
Original Item Location ID 2007-023, Box 9, Folder 18
ArchivesSpace URI /repositories/2/archival_objects/9847
Original Collection Outdoor Nature Club Records
Digital Collection Outdoor Nature Club Newsletters
Digital Collection URL http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/2007_023
Repository Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries
Repository URL http://libraries.uh.edu/branches/special-collections/
Use and Reproduction No Copyright - United States
File Name index.cpd
Item Description
Title Image 2
Format (IMT)
  • image/jpeg
File Name uhlib_2007_023_b009_f018_005_002.jpg
Transcript Page 2 species including Spotted Towhee, Bewick's Wren, Roadrunner, Rufous-crowned Sparrow, Yellow-breaster Chat, Black-capped Vireo, Lesser Goldfinch, Black-chinned Hummingbird, Canon Wren, Cedar Waxwings, Broad-winged Hawk, Eastern Phoebe, Rufous-sided Towhee, Bullock's Oriole, Grasshopper Sparrow, Ladder-backed Woodpecker, and Swainson's Hawk, XXXXXXXXX-X--X-XXX xx-x-****-xxxx xxxxxxxxxxxxxx*xxxxxx*xxxx-x- APRIL MIGRANT RIPPLES T. Ben Feltner April 21st brought fairly heavy south-east winds throughout the checklist, area. Under normal conditions southerly winds tend to preclude a stack-up of migrants on Galveston and the coastal regions. Because of the rather strong easterly influence, however, birders, who were active during the period of April 21 - 23, were able to see good numbers of Eastern Flyway birds. The trend was set by Elvic McHenry who birded Galveston on the 21st and reported that migrants were few but good-. The commonest warbler seen that day was the Blackpoll, thirteen being seen in various migrant traps throughout the Island. In addition3.Bobolinks were found at Mulberry Grove No. 1 (ENM). TBF) returned to the Island and found The Blackpolls were again found through- The presence of these rare or uncommon birds and the marked absence of The following day, April 22, (ENM, DAD 28 Blackpolls, 1 Bobolink and 1 Cape May Warbler out Galveston. commoner migrants led this writer to believe that: 1. Those birds found were Eastern Flyway migrants blown into the Texas coast by the strong south-east winds. 2. Our regular migrants aided by the wind pushed on inland for some way before putting down. Why did the eastern migrants stop at Galveston? I think that this being their first land they were attempting to correct their navigation to the East rather than continue in their northwesterly course. In addition they had traversed more than the usual amount of open water and were probably tired. Small Wave April 24 The night of April 23 and morning of April 24 brought some fairly strong rainstorms into the area. The writer birded Compton's woods in Seabrook and found about $00 migrants (most of them unindentified). Cerulean, Tennessee, and Chestnut- sided Warblers were most abundant. Kemah produced only one migrant, a Kentucky Warbler. Kempner Park held (4) Chestnut-sided, (2) Golden-winged and (3) Tennessee Warblers. A i" few Blackpolls were still in evidence at Seabrook and Menard House. The latter location was excellent for Veery, Gray-cheeked, Olive-backed and Wood--Thrushes. Wave April 27 Another rain-induced wave hit on the 27th. Again Compton's Woods was the best location for 14 species of warblers were recorded including Bay-breasted, Magnolia, Swainson's and Tennessee Warblers. The latter was the commonest bird, its numbers running into the hundreds. Kempner Park was good with Ceruleans (5), Blackpolls (3), and Chestnut- sided (8) leading the warbler count. The most spectacular stack-up was at Nottingham Ranch Road where I found about 200 Baltimore Orioles in one flock. ***■*■)( X XXX XXXXXXXXXXXXXX3-XX XXXXXXXXXXXXXXX*-*-X"X-XXXXXX* PEOPLE ARE TALKING ABOUT: The weird migration this spring with its small numbers of normal migrants (except in a few instances - see Clearing House) and the abnormal numbers of rare migrants— Blackpolls outnumbering Black and Whites, Cape-Mays outdistancing Bay-breasted Warblers while Bobolinks and White-winged Doves strove for attention along with Yellow-headed Blackbird, Lazuli Bunting, and Western Tanager,! Your editors expect to summarize this migration next issue when the picture is more complete. We feel that there must be more involved than the high surface winds (southerly to south-east) as these are typical of our spring. GALVESTON nominated again for PLACE OF THE MONTH with HIGH ISLAND and COMPTON'S WOODS (Toddville Road) coming next! The current issue of AUDUBON Magazine with its blazoning article TEIX COVER THE NEARLY EXTINCT ESKIMO CURLEW by Victor L. Emanuel. REDIS-