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The Spoonbill, Vol. 11, No. 11, March 1963
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The Spoonbill, Vol. 11, No. 11, March 1963 - Image 5. March 1963. Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries. University of Houston Digital Library. Web. May 10, 2021. https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/2007_023/item/3861/show/3851.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

(March 1963). The Spoonbill, Vol. 11, No. 11, March 1963 - Image 5. Outdoor Nature Club Newsletters. Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries. Retrieved from https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/2007_023/item/3861/show/3851

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

The Spoonbill, Vol. 11, No. 11, March 1963 - Image 5, March 1963, Outdoor Nature Club Newsletters, Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries, accessed May 10, 2021, https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/2007_023/item/3861/show/3851.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

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Compound Item Description
Title The Spoonbill, Vol. 11, No. 11, March 1963
Alternative Title The Spoonbill, Vol. XI, No. 11, March 1963
Contributor (Local)
  • Ellis, Pat
  • Ellis, Jim
Publisher Outdoor Nature Club
Date March 1963
Subject.Topical (LCSH)
  • Ornithology
Subject.Geographic (TGN)
  • Houston, Texas
Genre (AAT)
  • newsletters
  • periodicals
Language English
Type (DCMI)
  • Text
Original Item Location ID 2007-023, Box 9, Folder 21
ArchivesSpace URI /repositories/2/archival_objects/9848
Original Collection Outdoor Nature Club Records
Digital Collection Outdoor Nature Club Newsletters
Digital Collection URL http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/2007_023
Repository Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries
Repository URL http://libraries.uh.edu/branches/special-collections/
Use and Reproduction No Copyright - United States
File Name index.cpd
Item Description
Title Image 5
Format (IMT)
  • image/jpeg
File Name uhlib_2007_023_b009_f021_003_005.jpg
Transcript ON LOONS Jerry Strickling Nancy and I have been studying loons. We have made several trips this winter to the Texas City Dike. On each trip we've spent several hours looking at the loons with our binoculars and scope. Quoting Dr. Oliver Austin in Birds of the World, "Loon sexes are alike and they cannot be told apart by size or coYor.....The best identifying marks in winter are size, shape, and carriage." And "In Winter garb all four species are so alike that experts have trouble telling them apart." "The Common Loon, a 36 inch bird" "The smallest loon....Red- throated (is) only 24 inches long." Dr. Lowery in Louisiana_Blrds says of the Red-throated Loon, "An accidental visitor to Louisiana'.'.".. .a single known instance...in the State in 1945.....about the size of a Mallard. The Common Loon... such a dark gray that it appears black at a distance, while the Red- throated Loon is only an ashy gray." Roger Tory Peterson,nee Kincaid, gives sizes. 28 - 36 and Red-Throated Loon as 24 - 27 inches. .Common Loon We've seen some peculiar loons at the Texas City Dike. Several have been smaller than other near-by loons. We have seen several with noticeably upturned bills. All with upturned bills have been smaller by direct comparison than the straight billed loons. The smaller loons, with the upturned bills, appeared solid colored on the back. We saw four (4) Sunday, March 3, 1963. The larger, straight-billed loons had white specks (scales) on the back. The upturned mandibles of all of the smaller loons seemed lighter colored than the straight mandibles of the larger loons. IN SEARCH OF A TEAL Pat Ellis After Bill Harwell spotted a lone, male Cinnamon Teal at Sheldon Reservoir on February 17th, he returned again the following Thursday (2-21-63) but didn't find the bird. However, he talked with the Game Warden at Sheldon and learned that the Teal had been trapped, banded, and released and had been at the Reservoir for two months. My efforts to see this Teal have been futile. Margaret Anderson and I made the trip on February 18th in a deluge of rain (hard core maybe?) but to no avail. Jim and I searched and scoped for hours on another occasion (3-3-63) but saw only Blue- winged Teals. On March 7th, Peggy Smith and I went first to Texas City to get a good look at the Old Squaws (4) and Loons and then to Sheldon but a long search failed to produce anything but Blue-winged and Green- winged Teals. We found a pair of Wood Ducks at Buckhorn Lake close to the shore and in bright sunlight and the excitement of this duck In such brilliant light and at such a short distance was difficult to break away from, but we made a quick run back to Sheldon and after another long search concluded that this Cinnamon Teal was playing hard to see or had left the Reservoir. THE ROAD CLEANER Bob Braden and his family got a spectacular introduction to a majestic bird. Just after- turning onto Interstate Highway 10 on their way home from Beaumont, a large bird swooped down right in front of their car to pick up a DOR animal. The bird flew about 40 yards off the road and ate dinner. The hungry predator was a Bald Eagle. The Bradens had plenty of time to study the Eagle through a scope while he dined. What a way to get a liferi