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The Spoonbill, Vol. 11, No. 10, February 1963
Image 3
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The Spoonbill, Vol. 11, No. 10, February 1963 - Image 3. February 1963. Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries. University of Houston Digital Library. Web. August 9, 2020. https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/2007_023/item/3758/show/3746.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

(February 1963). The Spoonbill, Vol. 11, No. 10, February 1963 - Image 3. Outdoor Nature Club Newsletters. Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries. Retrieved from https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/2007_023/item/3758/show/3746

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

The Spoonbill, Vol. 11, No. 10, February 1963 - Image 3, February 1963, Outdoor Nature Club Newsletters, Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries, accessed August 9, 2020, https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/2007_023/item/3758/show/3746.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

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Compound Item Description
Title The Spoonbill, Vol. 11, No. 10, February 1963
Alternative Title The Spoonbill, Vol. XI, No. 10, February 1963
Contributor (LCNAF)
  • Snyder, Linda
Contributor (Local)
  • Snyder, Clinton
Publisher Outdoor Nature Club
Date February 1963
Subject.Topical (LCSH)
  • Ornithology
Subject.Geographic (TGN)
  • Houston, Texas
Genre (AAT)
  • newsletters
  • periodicals
Language English
Type (DCMI)
  • Text
Original Item Location ID 2007-023, Box 9, Folder 21
ArchivesSpace URI /repositories/2/archival_objects/9848
Original Collection Outdoor Nature Club Records
Digital Collection Outdoor Nature Club Newsletters
Digital Collection URL http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/2007_023
Repository Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries
Repository URL http://libraries.uh.edu/branches/special-collections/
Use and Reproduction No Copyright - United States
File Name index.cpd
Item Description
Title Image 3
Format (IMT)
  • image/jpeg
File Name uhlib_2007_023_b009_f021_002_003.jpg
Transcript Page 3 considerably reduced in numbers. At a place where we counted hundreds during the Christmas Count I saw less than a dozen recently. Mr. McKay reported an unusual 132 species for January but remarked that many seemed to be below par in numbers. Birds quickly stripped Yaupon, Privet and other berries and flocked to feeders in the area - the Kokeshes had 18 species at theirs on Jan. 27, while I had some 35 seen only from the house on a bitter Jan- 20 (24°). In the frantic foraging for food many birds changed their habits and habitats. Mr. McKay tells of a King Rail which would appear after the first cast of a net for bait (by Arnold McKay) and would wait for a handout! This continued until-the heavy freezes ruined the bait-casting. Robins were noted in ditches and marshes, on prairies, roadsides and the beach. That skulker, the Hermit Thrush, became a common roadside bird, also appearing openly in yards and at feeders. The high winds added another hazard to a bad situation, for many birds, flying low over the roads, were hit by cars. On one stretch of Hwy. l46 North I counted some 25 dead Robins, 4 Hermit Thrushes, and a dozen unidentified birds. Some dead owls along the roadside were reported from other sections. L.S. HERE AND THERE Sequel on the misguided SWAN. The SWAN Homer Harmon called twice to his duck blind went to another blind and was killed! The body was poor and full of lice, and parts of both feet were missing. Harmon thinks it was a Mute Swan, possibly a stray from a park. Submitted by Arlie K. McKay The Kokeshes of El Lago Estates entertained a feeders during the month of January. Yellow-breated Chat at thair Mrs. Frankie Daves Of Old River had a Catbird visiting her feeder daily. The Snyders ran a clinic in their greenhouse - the patients being a frozen Robin and a Sora Rail. The rail was very friendly In his unwell state even to the point of climbing onto a shoulder! He ate moistened bread and swallowed 2-inch minnows whole after stunning them with his bill. Both birds have been released to battle the elements again. A nice note to your editors from Jim Henderson of Midland added more to the brant situation in Texas by enclosing the following reprint from THE AUK, Vol. 77; April I960: "A Texas Record of the Black Brant.- The A.O.U. Check-list (5th ed., 1957, p. 64) lists the Black Brant (Branta nigricans) as of only casual occurrence in Texas. Wolfe (Check-list of the Birds of Texas, 1956, p. 14) gives only one record of a bird shot in Tom Green County in 1884 and a sight record near Brownsville in 1938. On 28 December 1956, I was goose hunting in Wilbarger County, Texas, about 15 miles south of Vernon. An adjacent hunter, whose name I did not learn, shot a black goose from a flock of Canada Geese (Branta canadensis) that had been decoyed to a typical wheat field pit blind. This goose was picked out and shot because it was observed to be entirely different from any of the other geese in the flock. Recognizing that any brant was an unusual species for Texas, I secured the bird as a specimen. It was still warm when it came into my possession. A colored photograph of this bird has been identified by Dr. John W. Aldrich as being Branta bernicla nigricans. Unfortunately, neither I nor the taxidermist sexed this specimen. The mounted bird is now in my possession." - J. C. Henderson, Box 5132, Midland, Texas. Nancy Strickling sends in some information on martins. To keep the nestlings from leaving the nest prematurely, place a teaspoon of sulfer in each compartment to kill lice, etc., and be certain there is enough ventilation to keep the boxes from over-heating. Fallen young may only be replaced in their correct hole; otherwise, place on house ledge or on a nearby branch for the parents to feed. ********************************** HEW EDITORS FOR THE SPOOBBILL - Your editors announce their premature retirement with this issue. Jim Ellis, your newly elected editor, has consented to taking over the two remaining issues. Send all future material to him: James 0. Ellis, Editorial Engineering, Inc., 4901 Richmond Ave., or to home address, 54l4 Fairdale (27), Tel. Bo. Mo. 5-1410.