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The Spoonbill, Vol. 1, No. 4, January 30, 1953
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The Spoonbill, Vol. 1, No. 4, January 30, 1953 - Image 3. January 30, 1953. Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries. University of Houston Digital Library. Web. September 22, 2019. https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/2007_023/item/3743/show/3741.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

(January 30, 1953). The Spoonbill, Vol. 1, No. 4, January 30, 1953 - Image 3. Outdoor Nature Club Newsletters. Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries. Retrieved from https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/2007_023/item/3743/show/3741

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

The Spoonbill, Vol. 1, No. 4, January 30, 1953 - Image 3, January 30, 1953, Outdoor Nature Club Newsletters, Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries, accessed September 22, 2019, https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/2007_023/item/3743/show/3741.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

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Title The Spoonbill, Vol. 1, No. 4, January 30, 1953
Publisher Outdoor Nature Club
Date January 30, 1953
Subject.Topical (LCSH)
  • Ornithology
Subject.Geographic (TGN)
  • Houston, Texas
Genre (AAT)
  • newsletters
  • periodicals
Language English
Type (DCMI)
  • Text
Original Item Location ID 2007-023, Box 9, Folder 2
ArchivesSpace URI /repositories/2/archival_objects/9838
Original Collection Outdoor Nature Club Records
Digital Collection Outdoor Nature Club Newsletters
Digital Collection URL http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/2007_023
Repository Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries
Repository URL http://libraries.uh.edu/branches/special-collections/
Use and Reproduction No Copyright - United States
File Name index.cpd
Item Description
Title Image 3
Format (IMT)
  • image/jpeg
File Name uhlib_2007_023_b009_f002_002_003.jpg
Transcript J i • 3. (SGW). The last to leave were seven seen at Cove on October 5* These were later by eight days than in any previous year and Were no doubt detained by the army worms on which they were feeding., Wilson's Phalaropes arrived at Cove on August 17 (AKM) and at Brownsville August 21 (FWL). A Red Phalarope which was present at Rockport on October 5 and 6 was Mrs. Hagar's first observation of this species in that area. Franklin's Gulls were seen in considerable numbers over a wide area of the state. About 150 went over Cove on October 4 and about 15.000 on October 11 (AKM). On October 14 about 1,000 were seen feeding near Hockley (MAH;. On October 16 four were seen at the eastern extreme of the state near Orange (FGW) and on October 21, November 7, and November 9 flocks went over Austin (EBK, RSP). A few were seen at Cove on November 22 (AKM). Cabot's Terns, which are post-nesting iranderers along the upper Gulf Coast, were present in more than usual numbers from August 24 to November 30. Owls. Goatsuckers, and Hummingbirds. - A single Burrowing Owl was present at a culvert near Deer Park from September 30 to October 6 (FGW). A Short-eared Owl at Cove on October 19 was a month earlier than previous records (AKM). Chuck-wills- widows migrated through the upper coastal area from August 24 to October 5« The first was recorded at Cove (AKM) while the last observation was at Houston (MAY). Ruby- throated Hummingbirds migrated through Rockport in a steady stream for most of October and a second wave consisting of Ruby-throated, Black-chinned, and Broad-tailed Hummingbirds went through between November 15 and November 24 (JH). """—— Flycatchers. Larks, and Swallows. - The last Eastern Kingbirds were seen near Deer Park on September 20 (SGW) and at Cove on September 21 (AKM). Western Kingbirds, usually scarce in the upper coastal area, were seen by several people and went through between August 13 and October 25. The last Scissor-tailed Flycatchers were seen at Bryan on October 19 (KLD), at Cove on October 18 (AKM), and at Rockport on November 25 (JH). An Eastern Phoebe seen at Galveston on September 7 (FGW) was a month earlier than the next report which was from Cove on October 7 (AKM). Vermilion -Flycatchers, which wander into our area in fall from the south and west, anoeared at Cove on September 14 (AKM) and at Rockport on October 20 (JH). Horned Larks were noted at Austin on November 9, December 7, and December 14 (MCJ, EBK). This species is rare in the Austin region . On August 19 Barn Swallows were migrating continuously from early morning to late afternoon through the oil fields near Manvel south of Houston at a rate of 20 to 50 per minute (JMH). On August 27,Barn Swallows were migrating in numbers through downtown Houston (SGW). On September 28 they were migrating along the coast at Galveston (FGW), On October 14 swallows were migrating by the thousands over the rice fields near Hockley. Cliff Swallows were most numerous with Barn Swallows, Bank Swallows, and Tree Swallows following in that order (MAH). Brown Creeper to Starling0 - The Brown Creeper came earlier and in greater numbers than usual. The first was noted at Cove on October 18 (AKM) but this species was not generally distributed in the upper coastal area until about mid-November. Bewick's Wrens were seen at Cove on October 19 and November 22 (AKM). These were the only records this season east of Rockport where the species is of regular occurrence. Brown Thrashers were first seen at Cove on September 22 (AKM) and they flooded the upper coastal area on September 28 being noted in great numbers at the Little Thicket Sanctuary near Evergeen (JMH), and at Houston (MAY), and at Galveston (FGW). The Sage Thrasher, usually present in the western part of the region in limited numbers in fall, was observed only once, at Austin on November 29 (RSP). Robins and Eastern Bluebirds moved through the region in large numbers, the heaviest concentration occurring at Rockport on November 19, no doubt, forced southward by the strong cold front which passed over the region the day before. A few Bluebirds arrived at Austin on November 20 (RSP). Robins and Bluebirds reached the Rio Grande Valley in numbers which contrasted with last year's almost total absence of these species (LCG). Ruby-crowned Kinglets came in about the usual numbers, however Golden-crowned Kinglets were much above normal in numbers. Mr. McKay at Cove says, "more than any year since 1939tfo Mrs. Edna W. Miner, who comments from her observations at the Little Thicket Sanctuary says, "a very good year for Golden-crowned Kinglets." The situation in Houston was similar (FGW). In contrast, however, Mrs. Hagar did not observe the Golden-crowned Kinglet at Rockport and Mr. Kincaid reports that they arrived in the Austin area in only normal numbers. Water Pipits were attracted to the army worms in the Trinity River marshes and were present in flocks consisting of hundred of birds per flock on October 12. Spraguefs Pipits were also present "one to three at a time" about 50 being observed that day (AKM). Considering that in fall and winter in the Texas coastal area it is usually necessary to select just the right type of dry short grass prairie and then do considerable tramping in order to flush a Sprague!s Pipit, it might be said that we have been inundated by them this fall. It was only necessary to do a little walking in most any field to flush one or two and frequently one could be seen or heard from the car simply by stopping at intervals along a prairie road. The Starling, throughout the region from Houston to the Rio Grande Valley, came in greater numbers than previously recorded.