Keyword
in
Collection
Date
to
The Spoonbill, Vol. 1, No. 4, January 30, 1953
Image 1
Citation
MLA
APA
Chicago/Turabian
The Spoonbill, Vol. 1, No. 4, January 30, 1953 - Image 1. January 30, 1953. Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries. University of Houston Digital Library. Web. August 25, 2019. https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/2007_023/item/3743/show/3739.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

(January 30, 1953). The Spoonbill, Vol. 1, No. 4, January 30, 1953 - Image 1. Outdoor Nature Club Newsletters. Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries. Retrieved from https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/2007_023/item/3743/show/3739

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

The Spoonbill, Vol. 1, No. 4, January 30, 1953 - Image 1, January 30, 1953, Outdoor Nature Club Newsletters, Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries, accessed August 25, 2019, https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/2007_023/item/3743/show/3739.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

URL
Embed Image
Compound Item Description
Title The Spoonbill, Vol. 1, No. 4, January 30, 1953
Publisher Outdoor Nature Club
Date January 30, 1953
Subject.Topical (LCSH)
  • Ornithology
Subject.Geographic (TGN)
  • Houston, Texas
Genre (AAT)
  • newsletters
  • periodicals
Language English
Type (DCMI)
  • Text
Original Item Location ID 2007-023, Box 9, Folder 2
ArchivesSpace URI /repositories/2/archival_objects/9838
Original Collection Outdoor Nature Club Records
Digital Collection Outdoor Nature Club Newsletters
Digital Collection URL http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/2007_023
Repository Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries
Repository URL http://libraries.uh.edu/branches/special-collections/
Use and Reproduction No Copyright - United States
File Name index.cpd
Item Description
Title Image 1
Format (IMT)
  • image/jpeg
File Name uhlib_2007_023_b009_f002_002_001.jpg
Transcript t s • fc x ■ 0 Ml tefcss VOLUME 1 - NUMBEtt(£) During November we sent you Frank Watson8s report to Audubon Field Notes for the Summer Season of 1952. Following is his report on Fall Migration, 1952s South Texas Region - In September the drought of the summer was broken in the southern part of the region by rains which approached normal for the area and by torrential rains in the Colorado and Guadalupe River watersheds in the central part of the area. In the upper coastal area rainfall averaged about half normal, which was not sufficient to overcome the prevailing dry conditions. In October dry conditions were resumed. There was no significant rainfall in the South Texas Region and average precipitation for the state was 0.03 inch, which is the lowest of record for any month in Texas weather history,, The dry conditions resulted in forest and marsh grass fires which covered the northeastern part of the region with a pall of smoke for a number of days in October. In September and early October hordes of army worms defoliated hundreds of acres of stunted grass in the Trinity River marshes. This provided a banquet for many birds, especially plovers, sandpipers, and pipits. The tables were turned in November since rainfall averaged almost twice normal. Water levels returned to normal and drought conditions were completely overcome. In August, September, and early October there were three mild cool fronts which reached the Gulf Coast. No pronounced migratory waves were noted in connection with these and apparently the bulk of the shorebirds, small flycatchers, vireos, warblers, and other early migrants passed almost without notice. From October 6 to December 19 cool fronts averaged about one per week and were of greater severity. Particularly strong ones were three which originated in the Rocky Mountain Region and which reached the Gulf Coast on November 10, November 18, and November 25, respectively. By that time most species present here only as migrants had departed, however many species arriving for the winter came in unprecedented numbers and several species extended their migration routes eastward or their wintering grounds southward and eastward as a result of the strong cold fronts of November. Species concerned are primarily among the hawks and finches. Since so many are concerned they will be noted only in the body of the report. Contributors to this report ares John W. Aldrich (U.S. Fish & Wildlife Service, Washington, D. C), Mrs. Myrtle Braman, Keith L. Dixon, C. T. Gill, Luther C. Goldman, Werner Gottsch, Mrs. Jack Hagar, Joe M. Heiser, Jr., Julian A. Howard, Mrs. Minor A. Hurst. Marshall C. Johnston, Edgar B. Kincaid, Jr., Fred W. Loetscher, Jr. (Danville, Kentucky), Arlie K. McKay, Charles H. McNeese, Mrs. Edna W. Miner, Richard S. Payne, Raymond Racki, Kit Roberts, Jule R. Schmidt, Frank G. Watson, Stephen G. Williams, and Armand Yramategui. Loons. Grebes. Pelicans, Herons, and Ibises. - The only report of the Common Loon was from Rockport where it arrived November 29 (JH)0 The Horned Grebe was seen at Cove a day later (AKM). On September 20 Stephen Williams and Lawrence Tabony rescued a starved sub-adult Gannet from the surf at Galveston. The bird lived on fish at the Williams1 home where it gained strength. It was subsequently released near the point of capture on October 10. This was apparently the third record for the Gannet in Texas. The last Reddish Egret was reported on October 25 and the last Green Heron on September 21, both at Cove. (AKM). The American Bittern arrived at Cove on September 6 (AKM) and at Galveston on September 20 (SGW). The Roseate Spoonbill stayed at Rockport until December 12 (JH). Geese and Ducks. - September rains filled impoundments on the Laguna Atascosa Refuge. This fresh water supply and the greatly increased acreage of farmland of railo maize and other small grains in the lower Rio Grande Valley were especially inviting to ducks and geese this fall. Their numbers on Laguna Atascosa Refuge were greater than in any previous year. When the water fowl peak was reached the third week in October, between 450,000 and 500,000 ducks and 7*000 geese were present. Pintails were present in greatest number, however, about 100,000 were Redheads. Canada Geese were estimated at 2,800, White-fronted Geese 2,400, Snow Geese 1,750, and Blue Geese 150 (LCG). Canada Geese arrived at Cove October 11 (AKM) and at Rockport October 16 (JH), White-fronted Geese were seen migrating at Cove on five days between October 5 and November 22 (AKM) and at Austin on October 23 (RSP). Snow Geese were first reported at Cove on September 28 when five were seen (AKM). On October 5 flocks numbering in the hundreds were reported going over Cove (AKM), Houston (SGW), and New Caney (WG). On