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The Zephyr, Vol. 2, No. 3, March 1925
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The Zephyr, Vol. 2, No. 3, March 1925 - Image 1. March 1925. Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries. University of Houston Digital Library. Web. December 9, 2021. https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/2007_023/item/3605/show/3601.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

(March 1925). The Zephyr, Vol. 2, No. 3, March 1925 - Image 1. Outdoor Nature Club Newsletters. Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries. Retrieved from https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/2007_023/item/3605/show/3601

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

The Zephyr, Vol. 2, No. 3, March 1925 - Image 1, March 1925, Outdoor Nature Club Newsletters, Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries, accessed December 9, 2021, https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/2007_023/item/3605/show/3601.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

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Compound Item Description
Title The Zephyr, Vol. 2, No. 3, March 1925
Contributor (Local)
  • Heiser, Joseph M., Jr.
Publisher Outdoor Nature Club
Date March 1925
Subject.Topical (LCSH)
  • Ornithology
Subject.Geographic (TGN)
  • Houston, Texas
Genre (AAT)
  • newsletters
  • periodicals
Language English
Type (DCMI)
  • Text
Original Item Location ID 2007-023, Box 14, Folder 28
ArchivesSpace URI /repositories/2/archival_objects/9623
Original Collection Outdoor Nature Club Records
Digital Collection Outdoor Nature Club Newsletters
Digital Collection URL http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/2007_023
Repository Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries
Repository URL http://libraries.uh.edu/branches/special-collections/
Use and Reproduction No Copyright - United States
File Name index.cpd
Item Description
Title Image 1
Format (IMT)
  • image/jpeg
File Name uhlib_2007_023_b014_f028_003_001.jpg
Transcript THE H Y R Monthly Bulletin of the Outdoor Nature' Club of Houston, .Texas, March," 1925 Vol.2,' No. 3 Pots of Gold The foolish 'followed the rainbow, Wherever they saw it bend; But they never came to the pot of gold That swings from the rainbow's end. Spring beckoned the wise,' "Come hither". They hearkened, and behold! The vines of the yellow jessamine Were heavy with pots of gold. — Mrs. A. J. James. "Whereas sons sections of our State abound in holly,' dogwood, and other decorative and flowering shrubs and trees which add beauty to our woods wherever they grow; And whereas many people are thoughtlessly cutting and gathering these plants for their own pleasure or ruthlessly for commercial purposes; Therefore, be it resolved that the D. A. R. in Texas go on record as opposing the careless and extravagant use of these greens and as favoring the conservation of all plants, shrubs, and trees of this kind." This resolution was passed at the conference of the Daughters of the American Revolution, in Wichita Falls, November 6th, 1924. Mr3. P. S. Tilson, Chairman of the Conservation and Thrift Committee, D. A. R. of Texas, has also kindly furnished Tho Zephyr a copy of the National D. A. R. Wild Flower Pledge, Which has boen.accepted by the D. A. R. Chapter of Texas, and is as follows: "That the world may be more beautiful for all, I promise not to pluck flowers nor destroy plants in woods and fields where they are unprotected, except such as flourish abundantly or are in the nature of weeds. All my influence shall be used to protect wild flowers from destruction by others. The Poor Man's Minstrel The season of song is at hand.- The concert and the opera we have had,' and are to have again. Vocalists whose artistic genius and skill has thrilled and delighted have sung from man-made stages,' lighted with all the brilliancy,' or shaded with the befitting gloom," which the sense and spirit of the songs demanded,' and the rioh, clad in purple and fine linen and adorned with jewels rich and rare, have listened enraptured. With spring and its roses anl flowers and violets and diaphanous clouds has come the poor man's minstrel. His stage is the dew-gemmed bower. The'only light which falls upon him is the golden rays of the moon,' or the shimmering light of the twinkling stars. He sets no hour to begin. At twilight, at the witching hour of midnight, in the misty gray of the early dawn, he sings as never singer sang before, and, running the gamut of every note and tone, rises to such heights of melody that the air is vibrant with the matchless music poured so prodigally forth in a.cataract of song by the monarch of all singers - the poor man's minstrel, the Southern mockingbird. — From _h.e Houston Chronicle, 1922. The pecan/ our state tree/ and the bluebonnet, our state flower/ are both typical of Texas. The mockingbird would be equally appropriate*as our state bird. Why not ehooss this feathered prince of our woodlands, before some other state claims him as its own?