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The Spoonbill, Vol. 28, No. 11, March 1980
Image 9
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The Spoonbill, Vol. 28, No. 11, March 1980 - Image 9. March 1980. Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries. University of Houston Digital Library. Web. April 16, 2021. https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/2007_023/item/35/show/27.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

(March 1980). The Spoonbill, Vol. 28, No. 11, March 1980 - Image 9. Outdoor Nature Club Newsletters. Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries. Retrieved from https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/2007_023/item/35/show/27

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

The Spoonbill, Vol. 28, No. 11, March 1980 - Image 9, March 1980, Outdoor Nature Club Newsletters, Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries, accessed April 16, 2021, https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/2007_023/item/35/show/27.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

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Title The Spoonbill, Vol. 28, No. 11, March 1980
Alternative Title The Spoonbill, Vol. XXVIII, No. 11, March 1980
Contributor (Local)
  • Jones, Margaret
Publisher Outdoor Nature Club
Date March 1980
Subject.Topical (LCSH)
  • Ornithology
Subject.Geographic (TGN)
  • Houston, Texas
Genre (AAT)
  • newsletters
  • periodicals
Language English
Type (DCMI)
  • Text
Original Item Location ID 2007-023, Box 11, Folder 7
ArchivesSpace URI /repositories/2/archival_objects/9865
Original Collection Outdoor Nature Club Records
Digital Collection Outdoor Nature Club Newsletters
Digital Collection URL http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/2007_023
Repository Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries
Repository URL http://libraries.uh.edu/branches/special-collections/
Use and Reproduction Rights Undetermined
File Name index.cpd
Item Description
Title Image 9
Format (IMT)
  • image/jpeg
File Name uhlib_2007_023_b011_f007_003_009.jpg
Transcript 3e 9 BLACKBIRDS STILL HARASS OWLS. RICE OWLS, THAT IS! The Oc+ober, 1974 SPOONBILL carried a request for information from Dr. Dan Johnson a teacher of Population Ecology at Rice University. As part of a research and management program at Rice Dr. Johnson was attempting to compile information concerning the history of the Rice roost of blackbirds (estimated in March of 1973 as being some 500,000 birds), as well as the location and history of other roosts In the vicinity of Hous+on. Dr. Johnson wrote a most interesting article for the March 1975 SPOONBILL on the history of Blackbirds at Rice, what was being attempted in an effort to alleviate the situation, and what had been the results. The Editor was reminded of this when reading the CH Editor's copy of the February 1980 SALLYPORT, Alumni newsletter from Rice U., which contained the following item: Bird in the hand....It's that time of year. The annual battle of the birds has begun again—and the people aren't winning. Each evening a dark cloud hovers over the campus and then descends, filling the oak trees with live leaves. Jones and Brown Colleges and the President's House, usually some of the hardest hit areas on campus, have been spared so far this season due to some Aggie ingenuity. Loudspeakers broadcast a cassette of bird distress calls during the crucial forty- five minutes when the birds return for their evening roost after a long day of foraging for food north of town. To further deter the birds, empty white feed sacks have been hung in the trees. All these attempts have driven the birds away right to the other side of the campus, especially around the Memorial Center. In retaliation, the RMC people got their own tape and Stan Barber says It has been pretty successful over the patio area, but that the trees surrounding the RMC are heavily inhabited, mora so than In past years. One campus expert predicts that the first real cold spell will start the season in earnest, bringing about half a million birds in a combination of grackles, robins, blackbirds, cowbirds, and starlings. Students haven't resorted to umbrellas yet, but they do tread softly on their way to the Pub or to the library. Some students have found a way to make sport of the spring visitors. A flock of Jones women have been seen letting out human distress calls, otherwise known as bloodcurdling screams, beneath particularly "loaded' tret Physical plant serves as the operations headquarters for anti-bird strategy planning. Over the past decade, the strategists have tried everything—tree "trimming, defoliation, cannon booms, ultrasound starter pistols, helicopters, and giant tree nets—all to great expense and very limited success. Russ Pitman, '58, campus business manager, jokingly comments that, "Part of our problem is the thickness of the trees on campus. If you could cut down every second tree, it would help" That, however. Is not a terribly popular solution. Meanwhile the battle of the birds rages on. Ellen Red, who lives a very short distance from the Rice campus, has had to curtail her evening walk around her block because of slippery underfootlng and drips from above! This is an increasing urban noisome nuisance, as populations of blackbirds seemingly climb ever upward. An estimated 800,000 to 1,000,000 blackbirds in the Rice University area makestfor a lot of guano!] FOLLOWUP [Anne Elston's delightful article in the January 1980 SPOONBILL on showing a slide program to some Katy third-graders brought her a letter from the grandmother of one of the students, Mrs. Virginia Alviset of Schulenberg, who Is a SPOONBILL subscriber. The Editor asked Anne +o share the letter with you]. Dear Mrs. Elston, I read about your talk to the 3rd graders at the elementary school where Kyle attends. When he was visiting us during the Christmas holidays he told me about your talk and was most impressed. Especially about the Burrowing Owls. He and I try to bird watch each time he comes up +o visit. Keep up the good work with the youngsters. I have always regretted that I was too dumb to take advantage of learning from Connie Hagar when I was a teenager. Sincerely, Virginia Alviset. CKyle Is a fortunate boy to have a grandmother who encourages his interest in birding. We would all like to know more about her memories of Connie Hagar!]