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The Spoonbill, Vol. 28, No. 11, March 1980
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The Spoonbill, Vol. 28, No. 11, March 1980 - Image 8. March 1980. Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries. University of Houston Digital Library. Web. April 16, 2021. https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/2007_023/item/35/show/26.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

(March 1980). The Spoonbill, Vol. 28, No. 11, March 1980 - Image 8. Outdoor Nature Club Newsletters. Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries. Retrieved from https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/2007_023/item/35/show/26

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

The Spoonbill, Vol. 28, No. 11, March 1980 - Image 8, March 1980, Outdoor Nature Club Newsletters, Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries, accessed April 16, 2021, https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/2007_023/item/35/show/26.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

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Title The Spoonbill, Vol. 28, No. 11, March 1980
Alternative Title The Spoonbill, Vol. XXVIII, No. 11, March 1980
Contributor (Local)
  • Jones, Margaret
Publisher Outdoor Nature Club
Date March 1980
Subject.Topical (LCSH)
  • Ornithology
Subject.Geographic (TGN)
  • Houston, Texas
Genre (AAT)
  • newsletters
  • periodicals
Language English
Type (DCMI)
  • Text
Original Item Location ID 2007-023, Box 11, Folder 7
ArchivesSpace URI /repositories/2/archival_objects/9865
Original Collection Outdoor Nature Club Records
Digital Collection Outdoor Nature Club Newsletters
Digital Collection URL http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/2007_023
Repository Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries
Repository URL http://libraries.uh.edu/branches/special-collections/
Use and Reproduction Rights Undetermined
File Name index.cpd
Item Description
Title Image 8
Format (IMT)
  • image/jpeg
File Name uhlib_2007_023_b011_f007_003_008.jpg
Transcript Page 8 Editor's note: the preceding article led us to check our newsletter exchanges for mention of some of these bir3s which wore • reported on the UTC. Listed below are a few areas also visited by some of them, during the 1979-1930 winter season. .Cameron, Louisiana: Anna's Hummingbird (3); Ash-throated Flycatcher (I); Say's Phoebe (t); Bewick's Wren (I); Green-tailed Towhee (I) Ft. Worth, Texas: Ash-throated Flycatcher (2) (also a Bohemian Waxwing....see Special Report in the CH this issue for a sighting this month in Bellaire). Lubbock, Texas: Lubbock Co. CBC, an underlined 15 Clay-colored Sparrows. Commented upon also were 10 underlined Brewer's Sparrows and I underlined Sage Sparrow. Tulsa, Oklahoma: A west coast bird which made a new record for the s+a+e of Oklahoma was a fIrst year Heerman's Gull, firs+ seen December 4, well-photographed, his call taped, and with an appearance on TV no less. Midland, Texas: A Varied Thrush started 1980 off In great style for the Midnats, being first seen January I. Frances Williams mentioned that in the winter of 1978- 79, at least 80 Varied Thrushes were found east of the Rocky Mountains. Some wandered as far east as Massachusetts and Virginia, several were found in Nebraska, Kansas, Oklahoma and Texas. Aus+ln, Texas and Mon+ecl+o, California: Two Grace's Warblers went wandering, one east and one west. One was found October 28 in Fred Webster's yard In Austin, in company with a Black-throated Gray and a Prairie'Warbler. Another was found In Monteclto for +he 9th record for CalIfornia and what was s+a+ed as the first winter record ever north of Mexico. Austin reports a late fall invasion of western birds such as Say's Phoebe, Green-tailed Towhee and Lark Bunting, and rates it as a most impressive seasonal event. So it Is going to be very Interesting to read-American Birds' summation of this 1979-80 winter season. BIRDING COLORADO COUNTY with Mike Austin After Jim Morgan's glowing description of the Attwater Prairie Chicken CBC In the January SPOONBILL, I decided to Investigate on January 26th, and found the area to be nothing short of phenomonal, and highly recommend the Eagle Lake area for birding. The trip from Friendswood was made in dense fog with a maximum visability of 1/2 mile until we arrived at the junction of FM 102 and 949, where I had planned +o start birding at which point the sun burst out and the fog melted....a good omen. The first good bird of the day appeared about ten minutes later...an immense flock of geese exploded from a field along FM 949 and (.stopped to Investigate. A huge raptor was circling overhead....a beautifully marked Immature Golden Eagle, which I watched for about 5 minutes. I saw what appeared to be the same bird late that day east of Eagle Lake (a town aptly named). Our next stop was an area of open oak parkland along a creek on FM 949 south of 1-10. In trying to locate a singing White-eyed Vireo I found the bird of the day— an Oven-bird. Also In the same area was an immense flock of Chipping Sparrows with a Field, Vesper and Grasshoper for variety. We next headed for the Refuge, Itself. A short side-trip down FM 1093 toward Wall Is added a Cooper's Hawk and another look at the Golden Eagle plus Innumerable Red-tails, Including some fine examples of kAideAii. The next excitement came about 2 miles south of the Attwater entrance on FM 3013— an immature Ferruginous Hawk eating a ground squirrel on the road shoulder not 10' from the truck—he was most co-operative and gave good views of his whitish tail and large white wing-flashes as he flew along beside us and exhibited a small ferruginous patch on the lower belly while perched on a telephone post. A calling King Rail and a low-flying pair of White-tailed Hawks welcomed us to the A+twa+er Prairie Chicken Refuge, i+self, and a Wes+ern Meadowlark perched on a fencepost showing his finely barred tail completed the 11st for the day. All In all, an outstanding day, especially for raptors, both species of eagles and vultures, 4 species of Buteo, the Cooper's Hawk and numerous Marsh and "Sparrow" hawks.