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The Spoonbill, Vol. 28, No. 11, March 1980
Image 4
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The Spoonbill, Vol. 28, No. 11, March 1980 - Image 4. March 1980. Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries. University of Houston Digital Library. Web. April 16, 2021. https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/2007_023/item/35/show/22.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

(March 1980). The Spoonbill, Vol. 28, No. 11, March 1980 - Image 4. Outdoor Nature Club Newsletters. Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries. Retrieved from https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/2007_023/item/35/show/22

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

The Spoonbill, Vol. 28, No. 11, March 1980 - Image 4, March 1980, Outdoor Nature Club Newsletters, Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries, accessed April 16, 2021, https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/2007_023/item/35/show/22.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

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Compound Item Description
Title The Spoonbill, Vol. 28, No. 11, March 1980
Alternative Title The Spoonbill, Vol. XXVIII, No. 11, March 1980
Contributor (Local)
  • Jones, Margaret
Publisher Outdoor Nature Club
Date March 1980
Subject.Topical (LCSH)
  • Ornithology
Subject.Geographic (TGN)
  • Houston, Texas
Genre (AAT)
  • newsletters
  • periodicals
Language English
Type (DCMI)
  • Text
Original Item Location ID 2007-023, Box 11, Folder 7
ArchivesSpace URI /repositories/2/archival_objects/9865
Original Collection Outdoor Nature Club Records
Digital Collection Outdoor Nature Club Newsletters
Digital Collection URL http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/2007_023
Repository Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries
Repository URL http://libraries.uh.edu/branches/special-collections/
Use and Reproduction Rights Undetermined
File Name index.cpd
Item Description
Title Image 4
Format (IMT)
  • image/jpeg
File Name uhlib_2007_023_b011_f007_003_004.jpg
Transcript Page 4 CHANDLER ROBBINS AWARDED ALLEN MEDAL....Fall Issue of Newsletter of Cornell L. of 0. The thtrteenth annual Arthur A. Allen award dinner honored Chandler Robbins. The in+roduc+ory remarks by Dr. Lancas+er concluded thusly: "Ar+hur A. Allen was strongly committed to the Idea that scientists should talk about their science to the public; that professionals should convey their findings to ama+eurs. Arthur Allen's enthusiasm kindled an Interest in nature, birds, and conservation for many students. Chandler Robbins also ignited the excitement and curiosity of watching and studying birds among thousands of persons of all ages. His profession remains his hobby. His professional objective, as he states It, is "To share with others a hobby that for four decades has given me a great deal of pleasure, relaxation, and satisfaction for by creating an interest in birds, one fosters an awareness for natural communities that are fast disappearing...." For contributions that have expanded our knowledge of the movements and distributions of birds; for highly successful efforts In broadening the general interest in birds through an innovative field guide; for stimulating amateur efforts through the establishment of cooperative research programs; for standardizing the bird-banding program and expanding Its use as a research tool; the Cornell Laboratory of Ornithology bestows upon Chandler S. Robbins the Ar+hur A. Allen Award". In accepting the Arthur A. Allen Medal, Chandler Robbins presented the following remarks on the future of bird populations and the study of birds: "This occasion is really a tribute to Arthur Augustus Allen, a man of tremendous Insight, decades ahead of his time; a stimulating educator, who directly Influenced the lives of over ten thousand sfudents and who, through his writings and public lectures, enlightened literally millions of Americans. Doc Allen realized the Importance of getting across his message to the man in the street as well as to his students. Much of the conservation movement today owes its origin to seeds he planted decades ago. Public apathy regarding the environment Is difficult to overcome, and It has taken a couple of generations of people such as Arthur Allen, Roger Peterson, SewalI Pettinglll, James Fisher, Peter Scott, Allan Cruickshank, Joseph Hickey, and Karl MaslowskI to condition the public to the point that there Is some support of such Important actions as international migratory bird treaties, pesticide control, and nongame legislation. "We are all grateful that Doc Allen's Influence Is still very much with us In the many research and educational programs of the Laboratory of Ornithology. These programs will take on Increasing Importance In the years to come. "Let us take a quick look into the future of bird populations on our continent, and the future of the hobby of bird watching and the science of ornithology. We are going to see severe impacts on our environment as we move into the 21st Century. If present populations trends continue, we can expect a 50? Increase In the human population of the United States within the lifetime of today's college students. We tend to believe that our land Is already being used to the u+most. What will happen +o our wildlife when we have 50? more human mou+hs to feed and bodies to clothe and shelter? And will the impact in Latin America, where so many of our birds winter, be any less than In our own country? ,£»■ ,. "We have learned to produce more corn per acre, but what will become of birds whose marshes are drained or whose woods are destroyed? They simply could not continue to raise young even if they were to attempt to squeeze Into smaller nesting territories In the remaining habitat. Several government agencies are beginning to talk of managing habitat for non-game birds. Research personnel of the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service, for example, are using computers to analyze numerical descriptions of habitats to determine specific features that are required by various species of birds. "Basically, however, future management will provide for retaining examples of natural habitats in their various stages of succession so that the needs of all the typical species are satisfied. This is where we are soon to feel the pinch. "We need more land for agriculture. This means a subs+an+ial loss of forests and a continuing loss of wetlands, together with an Increasing demand for irrigation water. Human needs in time of crisis are bound to take precedence over the needs of wildlife. There will be tremendous pressure for major changes in forest management: more extensive use of herbicides, insecticides, and monoculture, and shorter rotation periods. This means that many of the forest birds that we now take for granted will be lacking from a large proportion of the forests of the future. And as fields become larger to accommodate large mechanical equipment, hedgerows and small wood- lots will go, and farms will lose much of the diversity of their bird life. "Consequently, we need to start planning now for where we want to find birds In the future. Can we afford to protect and manage a few large natural areas In perpetuity