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The Spoonbill, Vol. 28, No. 11, March 1980
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The Spoonbill, Vol. 28, No. 11, March 1980 - Image 3. March 1980. Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries. University of Houston Digital Library. Web. April 16, 2021. https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/2007_023/item/35/show/21.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

(March 1980). The Spoonbill, Vol. 28, No. 11, March 1980 - Image 3. Outdoor Nature Club Newsletters. Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries. Retrieved from https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/2007_023/item/35/show/21

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

The Spoonbill, Vol. 28, No. 11, March 1980 - Image 3, March 1980, Outdoor Nature Club Newsletters, Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries, accessed April 16, 2021, https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/2007_023/item/35/show/21.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

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Compound Item Description
Title The Spoonbill, Vol. 28, No. 11, March 1980
Alternative Title The Spoonbill, Vol. XXVIII, No. 11, March 1980
Contributor (Local)
  • Jones, Margaret
Publisher Outdoor Nature Club
Date March 1980
Subject.Topical (LCSH)
  • Ornithology
Subject.Geographic (TGN)
  • Houston, Texas
Genre (AAT)
  • newsletters
  • periodicals
Language English
Type (DCMI)
  • Text
Original Item Location ID 2007-023, Box 11, Folder 7
ArchivesSpace URI /repositories/2/archival_objects/9865
Original Collection Outdoor Nature Club Records
Digital Collection Outdoor Nature Club Newsletters
Digital Collection URL http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/2007_023
Repository Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries
Repository URL http://libraries.uh.edu/branches/special-collections/
Use and Reproduction Rights Undetermined
File Name index.cpd
Item Description
Title Image 3
Format (IMT)
  • image/jpeg
File Name uhlib_2007_023_b011_f007_003_003.jpg
Transcript Page 3 EDITOR'S RECOMMENDATIONS *lf you have not yet subscribed to Birding News Survey, don't hesitate any longer. This quarterly magazine reprints Interesting articles from birding newsletters of all parts of the country. You will find identification aids, bird finding spots, equipment suggestions, field techniques, etc. Subscription: $6.00, payable to Avian Publications, Inc., PO Box 310, Ellzabethtown, KY 42701 *A bimonthly magazine you may find Interesting is Bird Watcher's Digest, with some reprints and some new articles, all on birds or some facet of bird watching. The November-December issue contains an article "Bronzed Cowbird Debuts In Mississippi" by Judith A. Toups, in which OG member Malcolm Hodges (a Rice Univertsty student soon to graduate) is given the honor of spotting the first Bronzed Cowbird in his home state of Mississippi. We predict you will enjoy this magazine which is beginning its second year of publication. Subscription: $7.50, payable to Bird Watcher's Digest, P.O. Box 110, Marietta, OH 45750. * Consider a membership in Cornel I Laboratory of Ornithology. The Laboratory Is almost wholly independent of Cornell University financially, and depends on memberships, grants and gifts to maintain and improve the Laboratory's research and public education programs (home study courses, seminars, exhibits, producing records of bird songs and calls for learning and pleasure, Interpreting avian research through the annual, The Living Bird and the Newsletter +o Members, and more). Supporting membership Is $25 a year, family membership Is $30. This Is a concrete way in which you can demonstrate your interest in bird research. In addition to contributing to the Laboratory's programs, each member will receive a subscription to the quarterly Newsletter and the annual publication. The Living Bird, as well as the privilege of a 15 percent discount on all Items purchased from the Laboratory's book shop. Send your remittance, payable to Cornell Laboratory of Ornithology, Cornell University, 159 Sapsucker Woods Road, Ithaca, NY 14850. Following Is a report on a bit of research, the results of which may prove beneficial to the wallets of you bird feeders. From the Fall 1979 Cornell Laboratory of Ornithology Newsletter....Sunflower Seeds Studied. In recent winters another kind of sunflower seed In addition to the familiar white-striped variety has become available to consumers for use as wild bird food. Smaller and all-black, they are called oilseeds by agriculturists who specialize in raising and selling sunflower seeds. They have been offered at lower prices than the white-striped seeds: In the Ithaca, New York area, the more familiar type sold for $17.50 to $22.90 per 50 pounds last winter, while the oilseeds were offered at $8.99 to $9.35 per 50 pounds about half the price. Since the savings can be significant, how acceptable are the oilseeds to birds at feeders? Last February and March, Cornell undergraduate biology major Christine Miller set out to answer that question as part of a class project, working under the direction of Dr. Charles Smith at the Laboratory of Ornithology. Birds visiting the feeding stations at the Laboratory were offered a choice of the two varieties, presented slde-by-side in Identical feeders. Chris monitored seed consumption by weighing the amounts of seeds of each type taken by all birds which visited the feeders, as well as observing and recording directly which type was taken most frequently by a given species. During the period of observation, species which visited the feeders Included the Black-capped Chickadee, American Goldfinch, White-breasted Nuthatch, Blue Jay and Tufted Titmouse. At the end of Chris's study, there was a clear preference by weight for the off seeds over the white-striped seeds. A greater amount of the oilseeds was taken, when compared statistically with the amount of the white-striped seeds consumed. Blacx- capped Chickadees chose to take more than three times as many oilseeds. In addition to costing less, the oilseeds have other advantages. Approximately 10% of their weight is kernel, while the white-striped variety is only about 57? kernel by weight. Thus, for an equivalent mass of whole seeds, there is more consumable kernel and less wasted shell. Also, since the fat content of the oilseeds is higher, there is greater potential energy value (calories). Experimental evidence from other studies indicates that feeder birds tend to choose those seeds which have higher caloric value in cold weather. Therefore, where they are commercially available as a wild bird food, the oilseeds seem to be the better choice: they offer more edible matter at a lower price and appear to be preferred by the birds. LThe Editor would like to hear from you bird feeders about the availability and price of these sunflower oilseeds on the UTC, so that we can report In nexf month's SPOONBILL].