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The Spoonbill, Vol. 41, No. 10, October 1992
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The Spoonbill, Vol. 41, No. 10, October 1992 - Image 5. October 1992. Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries. University of Houston Digital Library. Web. December 6, 2021. https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/2007_023/item/3489/show/3485.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

(October 1992). The Spoonbill, Vol. 41, No. 10, October 1992 - Image 5. Outdoor Nature Club Newsletters. Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries. Retrieved from https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/2007_023/item/3489/show/3485

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

The Spoonbill, Vol. 41, No. 10, October 1992 - Image 5, October 1992, Outdoor Nature Club Newsletters, Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries, accessed December 6, 2021, https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/2007_023/item/3489/show/3485.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

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Title The Spoonbill, Vol. 41, No. 10, October 1992
Alternative Title The Spoonbill, Vol. XLI, No. 10, October 1992
Contributor (Local)
  • Mueller Boyce, Judith
Publisher Outdoor Nature Club
Date October 1992
Subject.Topical (LCSH)
  • Ornithology
Subject.Geographic (TGN)
  • Houston, Texas
Genre (AAT)
  • newsletters
  • periodicals
Language English
Type (DCMI)
  • Text
Original Item Location ID 2007-023, Box 12, Folder 11
ArchivesSpace URI /repositories/2/archival_objects/9877
Original Collection Outdoor Nature Club Records
Digital Collection Outdoor Nature Club Newsletters
Digital Collection URL http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/2007_023
Repository Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries
Repository URL http://libraries.uh.edu/branches/special-collections/
Use and Reproduction In Copyright
File Name index.cpd
Item Description
Title Image 5
Format (IMT)
  • image/jpeg
File Name uhlib_2007_023_b012_f011_010_005.jpg
Transcript grapevines" (rare bird alerts) now all combine to put pressures not only on the birds and their environment but on us as the agents of that impact. Perhaps we must now deal with rewriting our own rules of behavior and the rules which guide us. Just as we would no longer think of chopping down the tree in the forest to see the nest and it's contents for positive identification nor of shooting a bird to study it, perhaps we will soon no longer need to visually observe the bird to add it to our records. Birding ethics, utilization of taped bird songs in the field and whether to count heard-only birds are all indelibly entwined with one another. The ABA's articles show the strong emotions contained on all sides of these issues. ABA's questionnaire on counting heard-only birds dealt with rule #4, which prohibits heard-only birds on ABA area and world life lists. If the responses they printed in the issues of Winging It. referenced above, are indicative of the total response, the yes and no votes are statistically equally divided (41 yes votes/ 40 no votes—with one response saying both yes and no). Again, within the spectrum of each answer were complicated reasoning for either not changing or for changing this rule which incorporated much of the same thinking as that entailed in the discussion of using tapes. Major arguments for retaining rule #4 as it is voiced by those feeling that years of hard work of "seeing" birds should not be negated by allowing others to count heard-only birds; that people are just not good enough at distinguishing between birdsongs (or their tapes which may be being played in the vicinity) to allow them to count heard-only birds; the number of inaccurate bird lists would swell; vocalizations are only one aspect of the bird; perhaps certain birds should be allowed to be counted as heard-only (rare, sensitive birds); and that to be able to count heard- only birds would be discriminatory to those who cannot distinguish nor hear some sounds. Major arguments for altering rule #4, interestingly enough, use some of the same arguments; it is discriminatory for those whose eyesight is no longer as good as it was; vocalizations are one of many aspects of the total bird; perhaps certain birds should be allowed to be counted as heard-only (such as birds which are difficult to distinguish by other than song or call), where far too much pressure is put upon the bird and the environment by the requirement to see a bird. How then do we continue our birding activities and within what scope should they be continued? I believe the ABA's discussions are crucial and hope that their lead is followed by other organized ornithological and environmental groups on local levels and that these discussions help in making us all aware of the impact our own individual activities have and that it will lead to new definitions of what constitutes the ethics of birding and just what birds we can count under what circumstances. In the final analysis, however, we are all responsible for our own integrity and the ethical behavior we take with us into the field will ultimately say much more than our lists. OG SEPTEMBER FIELD TRIPS SMITH POINT HAWK COUNT 1992 by Gail Diane Luckner Trip leaders, Gail Luckner and Winnie Burkett, hosted a total of 82 birders in two days of OG-sponsored field trips at Abshier Wildlife Management Area for Smith Point Hawk Count 1992. The two groups counted a total of 14 raptor species and nearly 4000 individual raptors in a combined eight hours of viewing. Wednesday, September 23 dawned cloudy and cool after frontal passage on Tuesday night, and 31 OG hawkwatchers were rewarded with over 2600 Broad-winged Hawks, three Peregrine Falcons and three Merlins. Throughout the morning, numerous Sharp-shinned and Cooper's Hawks flying side-by-side allowed for a direct comparison of field marks and flight styles of these sometimes confusing accipiters. Mississippi Kites drifted over in two's and three's, and American Kestrels delighted birders by snatching and eating dragonflies in mid-air. In all, 12 raptor species and 2851 individual raptors were spotted by the group. But raptors were not the only birds on Smith Point that day. Flying among the hawks were large kettles of Anhinga and Wood Stork, with the stork a life bird for Dolores Sandling. Many passerines, including Mourning Warbler, Dickcissel and Eastern Wood-Pewee, paused on the point, but an American Bittern proved to be the surprise bird of the day as it skirted the shoreline along East Bay. In all, OG birders identified 52 non-raptor species before the trip ended at noon. Conditions were not as favorable for 51 birders present at the Saturday, September 26 field trip. Thick fog blanketed Smith Point until about 10:00 AM, and the ceiling remained low throughout the morning. Despite poor viewing conditions, birders sighted nearly 600 Mississippi Kites and over 400 Broad-winged Hawks, as well as good numbers of accipiters and American Kestrels. Among the 11 raptor species and 1136 individual raptors were a single Black-shouldered Kite (a favorite of Saturday's lead counter Dawn Carrie) and Osprey. Shortly before noon, an immature Magnificent Frigatebird delighted viewers as it soared overhead and posed for the several birders who had brought along their cameras. Be sure to join us at Brazos Bend on October 21 for our next weekday field trip.