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The Spoonbill, Vol. 41, No. 10, October 1992
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The Spoonbill, Vol. 41, No. 10, October 1992 - Image 4. October 1992. Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries. University of Houston Digital Library. Web. December 6, 2021. https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/2007_023/item/3489/show/3484.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

(October 1992). The Spoonbill, Vol. 41, No. 10, October 1992 - Image 4. Outdoor Nature Club Newsletters. Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries. Retrieved from https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/2007_023/item/3489/show/3484

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

The Spoonbill, Vol. 41, No. 10, October 1992 - Image 4, October 1992, Outdoor Nature Club Newsletters, Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries, accessed December 6, 2021, https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/2007_023/item/3489/show/3484.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

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Title The Spoonbill, Vol. 41, No. 10, October 1992
Alternative Title The Spoonbill, Vol. XLI, No. 10, October 1992
Contributor (Local)
  • Mueller Boyce, Judith
Publisher Outdoor Nature Club
Date October 1992
Subject.Topical (LCSH)
  • Ornithology
Subject.Geographic (TGN)
  • Houston, Texas
Genre (AAT)
  • newsletters
  • periodicals
Language English
Type (DCMI)
  • Text
Original Item Location ID 2007-023, Box 12, Folder 11
ArchivesSpace URI /repositories/2/archival_objects/9877
Original Collection Outdoor Nature Club Records
Digital Collection Outdoor Nature Club Newsletters
Digital Collection URL http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/2007_023
Repository Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries
Repository URL http://libraries.uh.edu/branches/special-collections/
Use and Reproduction In Copyright
File Name index.cpd
Item Description
Title Image 4
Format (IMT)
  • image/jpeg
File Name uhlib_2007_023_b012_f011_010_004.jpg
Transcript cobalt waters, so did theseabirds. Cory's Shearwaters began to appear in ones and twos until, at eleven we found a flock of eight which sat cooperatively for close views of their plumage including their straw-colored bilk with dusky tips. It soon became evident that one of the flock was different, a subadult Pomarine Jaeger. It gave frustratingly distant views. Fortunately, about three hours later we encountered another shearwater flock with an attendant jaeger (the same bird?) with similar plumage characteristics. This bird put on a fine show at close range in wonderful light, harassing the Cory's unmercifully. As we approached the East Breaks, an underwater "reef formation seventy-five miles east of port, we saw our only small "puffinus" shearwater of the day. Although this bird sat on the water for a time, we never got good enough views of the bird's undersides to be certain it was an Audubon's, not a Manx. Around one p.m. .we followed the one hundred fathom underwater contour for a half hour, then headed in. Enroute we observed another aerial dogfight between a Cory's Shearwater and a Pomarine Jaeger. As we passed the shimp fleet encountered earlier, there were huge flocks of gulls and terns put to flight by no less than four jaegers most, if not all, of which we suspected were Parasitics (identification of subadult jaegers, especially at great distance is still, unfortunately, in its' infancy). Final trip tally was 30 Cory's Shearwaters (my personal best), one (probable) Audubon's Shearwater, four Parasitic and two Pomarine Jaegers. We also encountered many trans-Gulf migrants: a distant Peregrine Falcon, a Chestnut-sided Warbler and a Yellow-breasted Chat (the latter pursued by a Pomarine Jaeger), a Wood-Pewee, a hummingbird, an Indigo Bunting and a Brown Thrasher. There were also a smattering of herons and egrets wandering around out there. As usual, we also encountered other sea creatures including Portugese Man O'War jellyfish, two species of flying fish, mola (ocean -sunfish) and finally, a frisky pod of Spotted Dolphins who "rode" the bow of the boat for several minutes until the leader came to investigate. The trip set several records: the first OG pelagic trip to get out to the hundred fathom mark, the best weather and sea conditions of any Gulf pelagic trip (flat, cool and windless) and the only trip I've ever led which missed Masked Booby! All the participants should now know Cory's Shearwater and Royal, Common and Black Terns by heart. ********** [Trip organizer and participant Dave Bradfordsubmitted the following comments regarding this pelagic trip. Ed.] "The seas were calm. I mean really calm. Like glass. Only those who get-sick from the waves in their bathtub got sick on this pelagic excursion. Our leader, Mike Austin, selected a slightly different course from the last few trips and it paid off...we tallied about 30 Cory's Shearwaters. And a black speck called a Pomarine Jaeger. We watched it attack a Cory's for awhile. Eventually it gave up on the pelagic birds to pursue a Yellow-breasted Chat only a few meters from our boat...On the return trip two Parasitic Jaegers treated viewers on the bow of the boat to a water surface-hugging fly-by. As we birders continue to explore the pelagic realm of the Gulf of Mexico, I suspect some of the birds that are thought to be rare will be seen more and more. Remember, it was just a few years ago when notes were required on Cory's Shearwaters. We now get reports of 20, 30 and even more per trip. Let's keep exploring." TO COUNT OR NOT TO COUNT! OR TO SEE OR NOT TO SEE! Which is the Question? by Lynne Aldrich Recent articles appearing in the American Birding Association's (ABA') Birding and Winging It helped, I hope in initiating (certainly stimulating) discussions amongst the birding community on the use of tape recorders utilized for the purpose of coaxing otherwise non-seeable birds into the open for us birders to see (Point/Counterpoint; June, 1992 pp. 168-173) and on counting heard only birds (Winging It. Volume 4, Number 3 - March, 1992 pp.-9-ll and Volume 4;- Number 6 - June, 1992 pp. 6-7). These discussions were followed with an article on birding ethics in general with a questionnaire on "what you would do if..." (Volume 4, Number 7 - July, 1992 pp. 6-8). What constitutes "ethical" birding behavior and specifically whether tape recorders should be used in the field for other than the recording of the bird song itself have always been topics of some debate and as pressures from expanding numbers of those birders grows, this debate too grows. The argument in Birring on the use of tapes ranged from "no...with exceptional cases reserved for old people, the wheelchair bound and those with less than one year to live" - - to "yes, absolutely when used judiciously so that all members of a group can see the bird with the least amount of environmental impact." Within each of these arguments lie much thoughtful discussion of the impact all aspects of this increasingly popular sport has on the environment as a whole. As one of the authors states, "...our very pursuit of birds constitutes a disturbance of which there is a continuum of degrees." In the "old" days when birding was thought to be the activity only of "little old ladies in tennis shoes," the potential impact on the beauties of nature we were pursuing were certainly much less than now. Shrinking habitat, expanding numbers of birders and networks of "efficient