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The Spoonbill, Vol. 24, No. 12, April 1975
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The Spoonbill, Vol. 24, No. 12, April 1975 - Image 1. April 1975. Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries. University of Houston Digital Library. Web. December 9, 2021. https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/2007_023/item/3421/show/3413.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

(April 1975). The Spoonbill, Vol. 24, No. 12, April 1975 - Image 1. Outdoor Nature Club Newsletters. Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries. Retrieved from https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/2007_023/item/3421/show/3413

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

The Spoonbill, Vol. 24, No. 12, April 1975 - Image 1, April 1975, Outdoor Nature Club Newsletters, Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries, accessed December 9, 2021, https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/2007_023/item/3421/show/3413.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

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Title The Spoonbill, Vol. 24, No. 12, April 1975
Alternative Title The Spoonbill, Vol. XXIV, No. 12, April 1975
Contributor (Local)
  • Jones, Margaret
Publisher Outdoor Nature Club
Date April 1975
Subject.Topical (LCSH)
  • Ornithology
Subject.Geographic (TGN)
  • Houston, Texas
Genre (AAT)
  • newsletters
  • periodicals
Language English
Type (DCMI)
  • Text
Original Item Location ID 2007-023, Box 10, Folder 22
ArchivesSpace URI /repositories/2/archival_objects/9860
Original Collection Outdoor Nature Club Records
Digital Collection Outdoor Nature Club Newsletters
Digital Collection URL http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/2007_023
Repository Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries
Repository URL http://libraries.uh.edu/branches/special-collections/
Use and Reproduction No Copyright - United States
File Name index.cpd
Item Description
Title Image 1
Format (IMT)
  • image/jpeg
File Name uhlib_2007_023_b010_f022_004_001.jpg
Transcript Volume XXIV, No. 12 April, 1975 PUBLISHED BY THE ORNITHOLOGY GROUP, OUTDOOR NATURE CLUB, HOUSTON, TEXAS BIRDING IN WESTERN MEXICO by Elaine Robinson and Barbara Kendrick Would anyone who had seen the Rose-breasted Thrush-Tanager, Blackish Crane Hawk and the Tufted Jay not tel I you about their trip to Mexico? Very early on Friday morning In February we and our friend and guide, Ben Fe.l-tner, set off for western Mexico. After two days of hard driving and little birding the home of the Tufted Jay, The Barranca in the Sierra Madre Occidental on the border of southwestern Durango and southeastern Slnaloa was reached. The new hotel, Villa Blsn- ca, only 45 minutes away from the Barranca was more than comfortable, however the e- lectrtclty Is turned off at 11 pm and does not come on again until 7 am. An early rising birder needs a good flashlight to dress. One full day of birding the Barranca failed to produce the Jay, but Red Warblers, Green-striped Brush Finch, Whlte-strlped Woodcreeper, Slate-throated and Painted Red- starts, plus wintering US birds were seen. The next day, some of the more interesting birds found on the western slope of the mountains on the way to San Bias were: Yel low Grosbeak, Military Macaws, Cinnamon Hummer, Golden Vireo, Whlte-naped Swifts. San Bias Is a small town with palm jungle on one side and Pacific Ocean on the other. The first thing a birder sees as he enters the area Is the thousands of Magnificent Frigatebirds circling overhead. On this occasion they were accompanied by Short-tailed Hawks, Osprey and Black Hawks. The biggest day of birding the jungle at San Bias produced 112 species. A few of the birds found were: Bright-rumped Attfla, Blackthroated Magpie Jay, Yellow-winged Cacique, Collared Forest Falcon, Cltrollne Trogon, Russet-crowned Motmot, Happy and Bar-vented Wrens, Pale-billed Woodpecker, Rusty- crowned Grown Sparrow, Blue-rumped Parrot let and Fiammulated Flycatcher. The boat trip down the branch of the Santiago River, besides being beautiful, turned up every species we had prayed to God, Buddah, and Zeus to see: Rufous-necked Wood RaiI, Bare-throated Tiger Heron, Boat-biI led Heron, and Common Potoo - a Iifer for Ben. We saw the Potoo in day!ight and again as we went back down the river at dark, with eyes glowing as we found them with the flashlights. Next day on the way back up the coast, the'purplish-backed Jay flew across the road. "Jay" yelled Ben. We stopped and soon found 4 of these fine Jays. Another lifer for Ben. On we went to the IIttle town of Novltla to see if our tape would calI up the Rose- breasted Thrush Tanager. We were so taken: by the shell along the beach we could hard- |y bird. However, friend and guide Ben called our attention to a large black hawk perched In a tree not far away. Hurray!" The Blackish Crane Hawk — no, two hawks Up the beach bordered by an extensive thorn forest we found a cow trail leading Into the brush. Only a short distance down the trail we stopped and turned on the tape of the Rose-breasted Thrush-Tanager. It worked! First came the beautiful male Tanager singing back at the tape, then came the equally beautiful female. They stayed for a- bout five minutes and we all saw them well...Two more lifers for all of us. Heading home we stopped again at Villa Blanca Hotel to give the Tufted Jay another chance to show himself. Early the next morning at the Barranca the first bird we heard as we started up the path was a Steller's Jay and with It were 6 rare Tufted jays. To add to our list of lifers several Red-headed Tanagers came by. A total of 233 species were seen on the trip; 40 IIfers for both of us, and 8 for Ben. :'■''. .