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The Spoonbill, Vol. 42, No. 10, October 1993
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The Spoonbill, Vol. 42, No. 10, October 1993 - Image 6. October 1993. Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries. University of Houston Digital Library. Web. December 6, 2021. https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/2007_023/item/332/show/327.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

(October 1993). The Spoonbill, Vol. 42, No. 10, October 1993 - Image 6. Outdoor Nature Club Newsletters. Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries. Retrieved from https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/2007_023/item/332/show/327

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

The Spoonbill, Vol. 42, No. 10, October 1993 - Image 6, October 1993, Outdoor Nature Club Newsletters, Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries, accessed December 6, 2021, https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/2007_023/item/332/show/327.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

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Compound Item Description
Title The Spoonbill, Vol. 42, No. 10, October 1993
Contributor (Local)
  • Mueller Boyce, Judith
Publisher Outdoor Nature Club
Date October 1993
Subject.Topical (LCSH)
  • Ornithology
Subject.Geographic (TGN)
  • Houston, Texas
Genre (AAT)
  • newsletters
  • periodicals
Language English
Type (DCMI)
  • Text
Original Item Location ID 2007-023, Box 12, Folder 13
ArchivesSpace URI /repositories/2/archival_objects/9878
Original Collection Outdoor Nature Club Records
Digital Collection Outdoor Nature Club Newsletters
Digital Collection URL http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/2007_023
Repository Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries
Repository URL http://libraries.uh.edu/branches/special-collections/
Use and Reproduction In Copyright
File Name index.cpd
Item Description
Title Image 6
Format (IMT)
  • image/jpeg
File Name uhlib_2007_023_b012_f013_009_006.jpg
Transcript BIODIVERSITY AND ENDEMIC BIRD AREAS A recent environmental poll of random Americans showed a general awareness of various environmental problems and ako a concern to effectively deal with such problems as air and water pollution, waste disposal, and even deforestation tropical areas. However, not one person polled selected the overall loss of biodiversity as being one of the most serious problems affecting the world today. In an effort to define and quantify the loss of biodiversity, the International Council for Bird Preservation (now known simply as BirdLife International) has undertaken a worldwide Biodiversity Project, using two hundred years of avian bioge ographical database to create a rapid assessment plan to preserve all forms of plant and animal life on earth. It k the conclusion of many biologkts that "life on earth k entering an extinction spasm which, if unchecked, will be the greatest since the end of the Mesozok Era 65 million years ago." Simply put, biodiversity k the total variety of life on earth. It has been determined that just 2% of the earth's land surface k home to 20% of the world's bird species, and ako that 70% of the world's threatened birds are found in these same areas. These areas are ako very important for "mammals, reptiles, amphibians, plants, molluscs and insects." Obviously these critical areas need special protection to ensure the survival of the greatest possible numbers of species of plants and animak. These areas of restricted range species are often "islands of isolated patches of a particular habitat, especially montane and other tropical forests', and have been designed as Endemic Bird Areas (EBAs). An endemic species k simply one that k restricted to a defined geographical area. There are 221 of these EBAs worldwide and they contain 2,848 species of birds, or approximately 95% of all restricted-range birds in the world. "The future of all 221 EBAs k critical for global biodivesity conservation." From an economic standpoint, wild animak and plants are continually being used to benefit mankind in the form of "new drugs, new fibres, new foods, new genetic capabilities." Most of these discoveries have come about inadvertently during the exploration of some of these same EBAs and other wild areas of the world, and to fail to protect such future discoveries that could immeasurably benefit mankind, by allowing these areas and their biodiversity to be destroyed or degraded, would be a crime of global proportions. One example of an Endemic Bird Area would be the Costa Rican-Panamanian highlands in Central America. Thk k a relatively isolated, forested mountainous region of approximately 27,000 square kilometers, yet it contains "one of the highest number of restricted-range species confined to any of the EBAs identified by the project (52 species)." Most EBAs have 10 or fewer restricted-range species by comparison. The avifauna of thk area includes such interesting birds as the Black Guan, Fiery-throated Hummingbird, Ochraceous Pewee, Silvery-throated Jay, and the Resplendent Quetzal. For further information on Endemic Bird Areas and what you can do to help, contact: BirdLife International, P.O. Box 57242, Washington, D.C 20037-7242. Tel: (202) 778-9649. S ubmitted by PJD. Hulce