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The Spoonbill, Vol. 42, No. 10, October 1993
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The Spoonbill, Vol. 42, No. 10, October 1993 - Image 4. October 1993. Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries. University of Houston Digital Library. Web. December 7, 2021. https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/2007_023/item/332/show/325.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

(October 1993). The Spoonbill, Vol. 42, No. 10, October 1993 - Image 4. Outdoor Nature Club Newsletters. Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries. Retrieved from https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/2007_023/item/332/show/325

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

The Spoonbill, Vol. 42, No. 10, October 1993 - Image 4, October 1993, Outdoor Nature Club Newsletters, Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries, accessed December 7, 2021, https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/2007_023/item/332/show/325.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

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Title The Spoonbill, Vol. 42, No. 10, October 1993
Contributor (Local)
  • Mueller Boyce, Judith
Publisher Outdoor Nature Club
Date October 1993
Subject.Topical (LCSH)
  • Ornithology
Subject.Geographic (TGN)
  • Houston, Texas
Genre (AAT)
  • newsletters
  • periodicals
Language English
Type (DCMI)
  • Text
Original Item Location ID 2007-023, Box 12, Folder 13
ArchivesSpace URI /repositories/2/archival_objects/9878
Original Collection Outdoor Nature Club Records
Digital Collection Outdoor Nature Club Newsletters
Digital Collection URL http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/2007_023
Repository Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries
Repository URL http://libraries.uh.edu/branches/special-collections/
Use and Reproduction In Copyright
File Name index.cpd
Item Description
Title Image 4
Format (IMT)
  • image/jpeg
File Name uhlib_2007_023_b012_f013_009_004.jpg
Transcript ..•...•.OUTLOOK BLEAK FOR ENDANGERED PRAIRIE CHICKEN. The endangered Attwater's Prairie-Chicken, a native Texas grouse which once numbered close to a million individuak, continues to balance on the brink of extinction. Surveys...indicate that fewer than 500 of these birds remain- all of which are found in five Texas counties. Although last spring's population estimate of 456 was unchanged from the previous year, only two counties, Refugio and Goliad, experienced small population increases. Increases in these counties, which represent the heart of remaining Attwater's range, were offset by decreases in Austin, Colorado, Galveston and Victoria counties. No prairie chickens were observed in Victoria County thk year, adding to the long list of areas from which the Attwater's has become extirpated. Conversion of coastal prairie habitat to agricultural uses, drought during the late 1980*s and heavy rainfall during nesting and brooding periods have all contributed to the prairie chicken's decline. ...Future prospects for the Attwater's Prairie-Chicken do not look good. Brood surveys..jndicate extremely poor reproductive success during the spring of 1993, meaning an almost certain decrease in population next year. ...If the rate of decline observed over the past 20 years continues, the Attwater's will become extinct by the year 2000. Recovery efforts include restoring coastal prairie habitat, initiation of a captive propagation program, and research projects to identify other factors which may be limiting prairie chicken populations. Those interested in obtaining more information about the Attwater's Prairie-Chicken or recovery efforts under way may contact the Attwater Prairie Chicken National Wildlife Refuge in Eagle Lake, Texas (409) 234-3021 or the Gulf Coastal Prairies Foundation, 9019 Colleen Road, Houston, Texas 77080. Southwest Region FWS, September 28,1993. Submitted by Bob Honig .......OG MEMBER BERT DU PLESSIS, OWNER OF FISH EAGLE SAFARIS, k offering a budget safari to Namibia in May, 1994. A 14-day cross-country camping safari at $1,500 per person from Windhoek k just one of many birding/exploring trips being offered. You can reach Bert at 102 Stoney Creek, Houston, 77024, (713) 467-5222. .......TEXAS PARKS AND WILDLIFE OFFICIALS EXPECT AN EXCELLENT FLIGHT OF GEESE because of good habitat conditions and an early thaw in the Arctic The fall flight of ducks k expected to be about 59 million, about the same as last year, but a number of key species remain below their long-term average populations. Mallards remain about 20 percent down, pintaik 54 percent down and Green-winged Teal remain the same. The Gadwall population k about 35 percent above the average. ...Habitat conditions in Texas continue to be dry with an extended rainless period throughout much of the state during the late summer. The Panhandle has some good areas, but everywhere eke k below average. "We're hurting for freshwater marshes all over the coast," reported Brian a Sullivan, waterfowl program leader at TPW. W' TPW News, October 1,1993. _™HOW DO BIRDS PHYSICALLY PRODUCE THEIR SONGS? Instead of using vocal chords in a larynx, birds have a simpler structure called the syrinx. The syrinx k a small chamber at the point where the trachea divides into two branches. It does not have vocal chords, but there are muscles attached to the outside walk of the chamber that change its shape and alter the overall airflow. Bird species can produce sounds in three major ways, depending on their individual equipment. First, the thin side walk of the syrinx, called the external tympaniform membranes, can vibrate like a drum. Second, a bony structure called the pessulus controk a half-moon-shaped membrane that extends into the center of the chamber, and some species use thk and the external muscles of the syrinx to narrow the openings of the airtubes, or bronchi. Sounds are produced as air rushes from the lungs under pressure. Or, especially in thrushes, which can sing two harmonious notes simultaneously, the left and right tympaniform membranes can be constricted to close off the air tubes on each side, producing a double note. New York Times. Submitted by Bob Honig. • NOEL'S NICHE LOOKING BACK by Noel Pettingell 40 YEARS AGO /FROM OCTOBER 1953 SPOONBILL Of noteworthy significance to all bird watchers and conservationkts k the great crusade currently being waged by the nation's press on behalf of the near-extinct Whooping Crane. Newspaper editors, prompted by the National Audubon Society and the U.S. Fkh and Wildlife Service, all along the migration route of these magnificent birds, are doing all they can to impress upon the public the importance of allowing the 21 remaining cranes to return to their wintering grounds at Aransas National Wildlife Refuge unmolested. Last year at least two of the birds died of gunshot wounds. If the flock shows an increase thk fall, we can thank the power of the press for its contribution to a cause that involves far more than the salvation of one of nature's life forms...(See Robert P. Allen's reports in Texas Game and Fkh. September, 1953 and Audubon Magazine. September-October, 1953.