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The Spoonbill, Vol. 6, No. 8, December 1957
Image 9
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The Spoonbill, Vol. 6, No. 8, December 1957 - Image 9. December 1957. Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries. University of Houston Digital Library. Web. November 30, 2021. https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/2007_023/item/3318/show/3310.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

(December 1957). The Spoonbill, Vol. 6, No. 8, December 1957 - Image 9. Outdoor Nature Club Newsletters. Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries. Retrieved from https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/2007_023/item/3318/show/3310

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

The Spoonbill, Vol. 6, No. 8, December 1957 - Image 9, December 1957, Outdoor Nature Club Newsletters, Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries, accessed November 30, 2021, https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/2007_023/item/3318/show/3310.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

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Title The Spoonbill, Vol. 6, No. 8, December 1957
Contributor (Local)
  • Aiken, Carl H., III
Publisher Outdoor Nature Club
Date December 1957
Subject.Topical (LCSH)
  • Ornithology
Subject.Geographic (TGN)
  • Houston, Texas
Genre (AAT)
  • newsletters
  • periodicals
Language English
Type (DCMI)
  • Text
Original Item Location ID 2007-023, Box 9, Folder 7
ArchivesSpace URI /repositories/2/archival_objects/9842
Original Collection Outdoor Nature Club Records
Digital Collection Outdoor Nature Club Newsletters
Digital Collection URL http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/2007_023
Repository Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries
Repository URL http://libraries.uh.edu/branches/special-collections/
Use and Reproduction No Copyright - United States
File Name index.cpd
Item Description
Title Image 9
Format (IMT)
  • image/jpeg
File Name uhlib_2007_023_b009_f007_012_009.jpg
Transcript Page 5 confined to about a dozen scattered localities in South Carolina, Louisiana, and especially Florida, By 1926 many naturalists believed that the Ivory- billed Woodpecker was extinct. But a few years later some were found living in the Singer Tract In northern Louisiana,.and then some were seen in the Santee River swamp of South Carolina. An Intensive study of the speeies was carried on in the years 1937 through 1939, at the end of which Ivory-bills were believed to be living in those two localities plus about three areas In Florida. Since then, however, there have been no reports from the Santee River. -The Singer Tract in Louisiana, where Ivory-bills were best known and wh*re practically all of the life history studies were performed, was out over during World War II, Apparently the last bird to be seen there was a lone female observed In January 1944, The only recent reliable reports of this bird have come from northern Florida, but there have been no authentic reports since- 1952, Ivory-billed Woodpeckers were originally most abundant, judging from a study of all the old records, In the area between the Suwanne and Apala- ahieoia rivers at northern .Florida, whare the flat pine woods are intersected and dotted with many swamps. This great woodpecker may now be making its last stand in the region that even years ago was the center of its abundance. A program for the conservation of the Ivory-billed Woodpecker must include the following: 1. Determination of the location and range of surviving individuals. Persons seeing Ivory-bills can help by reporting their observations to the National Audubon Society, providing they are certain they have seen a real Ivory-bill and- not the somewhat similar and common Pileated Woodpecker. 2. Protection of the survivors of the speoies from hunting by curious gunners who might be the final cause of extinction. 3. Management of the forests so as to maintain an abundant food supply for woodpeckers. This,can be done In different ways, depending on wheather the area must also be managed for timber yield or wheather it can be maintained as a sanetuary for Ivory- billed Woodpeckers and other animals native to these swampy wildernesses, Conservationists must take the initiative In working out solutions ts> some of the complex social and economic problems that are involved In th* restoration of the Ivory-bill through management of its timber-producing habitats. Their success or failure will determine the fate of this bird. T. 0. S. FIELD TRIP TO THE RIO GRANDE VALLEY - (Vic Emanuel) "The Valley", these two words are enough to call forth visions of exotic tropical birds in the minds of many bird enthusiast, and for about eighty TOS members these visions became realities over the Thanksgiving holidays. However, the weather was not conductive to tropical visions. Thursday night was cool, and since we arrived In the Valley rather late, Ronald Fowler, Steve Williams, Larry Semander, Carl Aiken, and I spent the night In a boxcar just south of the King Ranch, It warmed up considerably Friday afternoon but by six o'clock the skies were overcast and that night a cool front hit. Strong north winds with occassional rain swept the Valley Friday night, making birding difficult the following day. Saturday night brought an unwelcome frost and most TOS'ers left Sunday morning. Despite the unusual weather, the birding provided some interesting finds, A few included, Laguna_Atascosa (Friday) = The most spectacular find blrdwise for this writer (a Diamond-backed Rattlesnake provided a reptile "lifer") was the large number of Buffleheads including some brilMaat males whose striking contrasts were especially vivid through the 0,G. spotting scope. Other interesting birds included Canvasbacks, Mallards, Pintails, Lessel? Scaup, Redheads, Gadwall, and Ruddys. A few land birds were a Bald Eagjps, Snow and White-fronted Geese, a Vermilion Flycatcher, Harris's Hawk, Blackthroated Sparrows, Starlings, Say's Phoebe, a White-eyed Vireo, Sora Rail, Kiskadee Flycatchers, a Cactus Wren, Sage Thrashers, Olive Sparrows, Bewick's Wrens, Avoeets, Reddish Egrets, two Marbled Godwlts, and a spectacular White-tailed Hawk which wheeled overhead, displaying its white tail with a black band and its white underparts,