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The Spoonbill, October 2001
Image 5
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The Spoonbill, October 2001 - Image 5. October 2001. Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries. University of Houston Digital Library. Web. June 20, 2019. https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/2007_023/item/3296/show/3292.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

(October 2001). The Spoonbill, October 2001 - Image 5. Outdoor Nature Club Newsletters. Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries. Retrieved from https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/2007_023/item/3296/show/3292

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

The Spoonbill, October 2001 - Image 5, October 2001, Outdoor Nature Club Newsletters, Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries, accessed June 20, 2019, https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/2007_023/item/3296/show/3292.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

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Compound Item Description
Title The Spoonbill, October 2001
Contributor (Local)
  • Haddican, Mary Pat
Publisher Outdoor Nature Club
Date October 2001
Subject.Topical (LCSH)
  • Ornithology
Subject.Geographic (TGN)
  • Houston, Texas
Genre (AAT)
  • newsletters
  • periodicals
Language English
Type (DCMI)
  • Text
Original Item Location ID 2007-023, Box 13, Folder 5
ArchivesSpace URI /repositories/2/archival_objects/9886
Original Collection Outdoor Nature Club Records
Digital Collection Outdoor Nature Club Newsletters
Digital Collection URL http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/2007_023
Repository Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries
Repository URL http://libraries.uh.edu/branches/special-collections/
Use and Reproduction In Copyright
File Name index.cpd
Item Description
Title Image 5
Format (IMT)
  • image/jpeg
File Name uhlib_2007_023_b013_f005_009_005.jpg
Transcript ofthe land or water into a fast and irregular flight with many twists and turns. If there are a number of them they will stay in a tight bunch. Gadwalls also fly quickly and ta a tight bunch but in a straighter line. Green headed ducks include Mallards and Northern Shovelers. Close up, the difference ta the bill shape and color makes for an easy ID. Both of these ducks have a combination of rust and white on the underside. The pattern of these colors, however, are reversed. The Mallard has a rusty breast and white (or light) underbelly while the Shoveler has a white breast and a rusty underbelly. Teal (drakes) are fairly easy to ID but females are difficult. In flight, there are some nice clues on the wing tops. Both Blue-winged and Cinnamon have blue on the top forewtag. Green- winged, however, have a green speculum and a dark grayish forewtag. Once again, many of the colors on the wings of ducks are not visible when the bird is grounded. Clues are available when ta flight that are not otherwise seen. There is white on the tops of wings of a number ofthe diving ducks. Three that look somewhat similar are Ring-necked Duck and the Lesser and Greater Scaup. All three have a lighter speculum and trailing edges to primaries. In Ring-necked, none of these are white. In Lesser Scaup, the speculum is white but there is no white ta the primaries, just gray. In Greater Scaup, the speculum is also white and the white extends about halfway out into the trailing edge ofthe primaries. Another group of diving ducks that have white ta the wings holding clues to their identity are the Bufflehead, Common Goldeneye, and Barrow's Goldeneye. The female Bufflehead plus the male and female Barrow's Goldeneye have a white speculum and a white bar ta front of that, centered front to back. The Bufflehead female, however, has a white mark on the cheek while the Barrow's Goldeneye does not (the male Barrow's Goldeneye has white on the face but it is just behind the bill). Three bars of white on the wing (speculum, mid wing and ta front of that, but behind a dark leading edge) point to the female Common Goldeneye. Note that Common and Red-breasted Mergansers also have these three bars of white, but the rest of their look is so different that they should not be confused with this Goldeneye. Male Buffleheads and male Common Goldeneyes have white speculums that extend into a large white field covering most ofthe inner wing top. Only the leading edge is dark. The male Bufflehead has a large patch of white behind the eye that extends completely around the rear ofthe head. The male Common Goldeneye only has a white spot behind the bill. Yes, ducks can be tough. Females are even tougher. By studying ducks ta flight, you will gain many tools that will help with duck identification ta general. Many times the wing patterns and speculum patterns and colors are similar ta the male and female ofthe same species, even where, on the water, the sexes are very different. The Internet site I mentioned above, is a great place for this information, as is Hines' original publication There are other sources for ID tips with ducks and geese. Identification ta flight is a concern for hunters, so sometimes literature prepared for them is a great help. Don is a regular writer and lecturer about birds and teacher of beginning birding. Contact him at (281) 997-0485 or cdplace@concentric.net