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The Spoonbill, October 2001
Image 4
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The Spoonbill, October 2001 - Image 4. October 2001. Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries. University of Houston Digital Library. Web. September 18, 2019. https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/2007_023/item/3296/show/3291.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

(October 2001). The Spoonbill, October 2001 - Image 4. Outdoor Nature Club Newsletters. Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries. Retrieved from https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/2007_023/item/3296/show/3291

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

The Spoonbill, October 2001 - Image 4, October 2001, Outdoor Nature Club Newsletters, Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries, accessed September 18, 2019, https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/2007_023/item/3296/show/3291.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

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Compound Item Description
Title The Spoonbill, October 2001
Contributor (Local)
  • Haddican, Mary Pat
Publisher Outdoor Nature Club
Date October 2001
Subject.Topical (LCSH)
  • Ornithology
Subject.Geographic (TGN)
  • Houston, Texas
Genre (AAT)
  • newsletters
  • periodicals
Language English
Type (DCMI)
  • Text
Original Item Location ID 2007-023, Box 13, Folder 5
ArchivesSpace URI /repositories/2/archival_objects/9886
Original Collection Outdoor Nature Club Records
Digital Collection Outdoor Nature Club Newsletters
Digital Collection URL http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/2007_023
Repository Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries
Repository URL http://libraries.uh.edu/branches/special-collections/
Use and Reproduction In Copyright
File Name index.cpd
Item Description
Title Image 4
Format (IMT)
  • image/jpeg
File Name uhlib_2007_023_b013_f005_009_004.jpg
Transcript Beginning Birding ID Ducks on the Wing I ran across a reference, a long time ago, that was printed by the federal government, dealing with the identification of ducks ta flight. I lost my copy and soon found that it was no longer ta print. Its title is "Ducks at a Distance" by Robert W. Hines. To my delight, I have found that it is reproduced on the Internet at http://www.npwrc.usgs.gov/resource/tools/duckdist/duckdist.htm. It, ta conjunction with several other sources, provided much ofthe material ta this article. This guide was, I believe, produced with hunters ta mind. Hunters need to be skilled ta the identification of waterfowl on the wing. They must know what they are aiming at ta order to adhere to various hunting limits and restrictions. I have found the information ta the guide very helpful ta my birding activities. Many birders study, at length, marks on ducks which help ta identification. Mostly, it seems, they study those things which identify the duck while sitting on the water or land. Ducks ta the air are often ignored by birders, and there is often more identification help ta literature aimed at hunters than at birders. The things which are helpful with ducks ta flight and at a distance are differences ta size, shape, plumage patterns and colors, wing beat, flocking behavior, voice, and habitat. The way they maneuver differs. Shovelers and teal fly by ta small compact groups while Mallards and Pintails appear in looser flocks. Silhouettes and shapes are important. You may recognize a Wood Duck by its short, broad, shovel like-tail and its crested head. A pintail appears long necked and sometimes shows its long pin tail. Colors and patterns on the parts that can be seen ta flight are very helpful. The location of white on the wing differs ta the Gadwall and American Wigeon. A field of blue atop the wing says this is a Cinnamon or Blue-winged Teal. The color of and border around the speculum can clinch the ID of a difficult female. Most ducks vocalize as they fly and they don't all quack. Many whistle, squeal, and even grunt. Not only vocalizations but wing noises can be clues. Flying goldeneyes make a whistling sound; wood ducks move with a swish; canvasbacks make a steady rushing sound. Even the surrounding habitat tells us things. The "puddle" or "Dabbling" ducks would seldom be swimming ta deep water, while diving ducks are not often found ta fields or shallow wet marshes. The identification of ducks ta flight and at a distance is probably the subject of a book rather than a short article. I hope you'll visit the web side I mentioned above. I'll discuss some identification points here, but you'll benefit with some further research and study. White on the tops of wings is common ta ducks, but ta the "puddle" or "dabbling" ducks a large patch of white on the top ofthe wing indicates a Gadwall or American Wigeon. The American Wigeon (and other Wigeons) have this white patch toward the front ofthe wing. The Gadwall is the only "puddle" duck with a white speculum, which means the white is near the trailing edge. When birding ta agricultural areas like harvested grata fields or other shallow wet areas, knowing about these white areas and their location can absolutely nail the ID. There are some other factors about these ducks. Wigeons are quick to take alarm. They leap upward from