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The Spoonbill, Vol. 10, No. 19, November 1961
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The Spoonbill, Vol. 10, No. 19, November 1961 - Image 6. November 1961. Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries. University of Houston Digital Library. Web. April 11, 2021. https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/2007_023/item/3287/show/3284.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

(November 1961). The Spoonbill, Vol. 10, No. 19, November 1961 - Image 6. Outdoor Nature Club Newsletters. Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries. Retrieved from https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/2007_023/item/3287/show/3284

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

The Spoonbill, Vol. 10, No. 19, November 1961 - Image 6, November 1961, Outdoor Nature Club Newsletters, Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries, accessed April 11, 2021, https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/2007_023/item/3287/show/3284.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

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Title The Spoonbill, Vol. 10, No. 19, November 1961
Alternative Title The Spoonbill, Vol. X, No. 19, November 1961
Contributor (Local)
  • Deshayes, Mabel
  • Deshayes, Bob
Publisher Outdoor Nature Club
Date November 1961
Subject.Topical (LCSH)
  • Ornithology
Subject.Geographic (TGN)
  • Houston, Texas
Genre (AAT)
  • newsletters
  • periodicals
Language English
Type (DCMI)
  • Text
Original Item Location ID 2007-023, Box 9, Folder 15
ArchivesSpace URI /repositories/2/archival_objects/9846
Original Collection Outdoor Nature Club Records
Digital Collection Outdoor Nature Club Newsletters
Digital Collection URL http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/2007_023
Repository Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries
Repository URL http://libraries.uh.edu/branches/special-collections/
Use and Reproduction No Copyright - United States
File Name index.cpd
Item Description
Title Image 6
Format (IMT)
  • image/jpeg
File Name uhlib_2007_023_b009_f015_011_006.jpg
Transcript OCTOBER 1961 O.G. FIELD TRIP by Clinton Snyder Page 6 When we met at the Baytown Tunnel, Linda Snyder said that the only thing she could promise us on this trip would be hordes of Blue and Snow Geese. The weather was a little more encouraging - a mild norther had blown in the previous night so that skies were clear, the wind northerly at 10-15 mph, and the temperature range was 55-75 degrees F. The Baytown Tunnel was faily productive, yielding good views of such birds as Avocets, Shovellers, Am. Widgeon, Pintail, and a flight of White Pelicans riding the thermal waves against an immaculately blue sky. The group turned westward via the ^sparrow place" (for the uninitiated, a wonderful stand of huisache bushes just east of Cedar Bayou, staked out by Arlie McKay as one of the best places for sparrows and fall migrants in the area). A quick stop produced a Philadelphia Vireo, Pine and Nashville warblers, but, unfortunately, time dictated that we must move on. At the pine woodlands north of Anahuac we saw typical birds of that habitat. High overhead soared a few hawks notably Coopers and Sharp-shinned. However, at Fort Anahuac Park the rate of hawks passing overhead increased, including only accipitersand falcons (mostly Sparrow hawks.) One group of birders lured into an open spot by an Eastern Phoebe suddenly directed their attention to a hawk flying overhead. The falcon shape and dark axillars immediately gave it away as a "Prairie Falcon. Now that the group's appetite had been whetted - one rare bird was not enough - we must see more! In the ensuing enthusiasm the party leader suffered a very faumiliating situation - we managed to lose the rest of the party due to a mixup of signals at a service station. The main contingent went rushing down the highway toward High Island trying to catch up with the party leader whom they thought was ahead of them as the frustrated party leader in reality was speeding madly down the highway trying to catch the main contingent. But the story has a happy ending; we were finally reunited at High Island. Our destination was the home of Wes Brannon the the NE corner of High Island. One of the first birds spotted there was a gorgeous Black-Throated Blue warbler feeding in the grass and low bushes. The bird was extremely tame, allowing itself to be approached as close as 10 feet. There were birds everywhere — Magnolia Warblers and Kinglets flitted on the ground; flickers and many Yellow- bellied Sapsuckers clumg to the trees; thrushes of three species were abundant in the scrubby bushes; and aBrown Creeper was giving all the trees the onceover. Then came the cry, "Red-Breasted Nuthatch" from the Hoffman party, an unprecedently early date for this deep winter bird. The nuthatch was also very cooperative, lingering in the area' and giving its distinctive "yank-yank." An Osprey soared overhead, then two Western Kingbirds flew across, and an Anhinga, frightened by hunters flew nervously over. Moving back towards the house, we found a fence row lined with bushes and loaded with birds - Catbirds, Yellowthroats, other warblers, a Vermulion flycatcher, and the real bird-of-the-day, an Ash-throated Flycatcher. The distinctively paler appearance with the whitish throat and pale yellow belly as well as the smaller size was noted. The majority of the group was able to see this bird which apparently is the second area record. A fitting climax to the day was the hawk migration which we witnessed at dusk. Numerous Broad-wings and some falcons came to roost In nearby trees as wedges of geese streamed over fromr.all directions. Birders included: Mr. and Mrs. Snyder, Clint Snyder, Sam Hughes, Katrina Thompson, Pat Sullivan, Thelma Smith, Norma Oates, Mary Belle & Frank Kokeah, Bill Harwell and son, Bill, Thelma & Cliff Garrison, Louise & Henry Hoffman, Irving Greenbaum, Hap Goodall, and Mr. and Mrs. Wm. L. Roever. OFFICERS: Chairman: Mr. Henry Hoffman Secretary: Miss Katrina Thompson Treasurer: Miss Ella Wolfer Field Trip Chairman: Miss Thelma Smith Program Chairman: Charles Mclntire Co-Editors of Spoonbill: M.& B. Deshayes 31.28.61 215 Marshall, Houston 6 JA2-5453