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The Bulletin, No. 6, Second Series, Spring 1937
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The Bulletin, No. 6, Second Series, Spring 1937 - Image 4. Spring 1937. Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries. University of Houston Digital Library. Web. September 20, 2019. https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/2007_023/item/3249/show/3248.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

(Spring 1937). The Bulletin, No. 6, Second Series, Spring 1937 - Image 4. Outdoor Nature Club Newsletters. Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries. Retrieved from https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/2007_023/item/3249/show/3248

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

The Bulletin, No. 6, Second Series, Spring 1937 - Image 4, Spring 1937, Outdoor Nature Club Newsletters, Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries, accessed September 20, 2019, https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/2007_023/item/3249/show/3248.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

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Compound Item Description
Title The Bulletin, No. 6, Second Series, Spring 1937
Contributor (Local)
  • Boone, Charles B.
Publisher Outdoor Nature Club
Date Spring 1937
Subject.Topical (LCSH)
  • Ornithology
Subject.Geographic (TGN)
  • Houston, Texas
Genre (AAT)
  • newsletters
  • periodicals
Language English
Type (DCMI)
  • Text
Original Item Location ID 2007-023, Box 14, Folder 30
ArchivesSpace URI /repositories/2/archival_objects/9625
Original Collection Outdoor Nature Club Records
Digital Collection Outdoor Nature Club Newsletters
Digital Collection URL http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/2007_023
Repository Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries
Repository URL http://libraries.uh.edu/branches/special-collections/
Use and Reproduction No Copyright - United States
File Name index.cpd
Item Description
Title Image 4
Format (IMT)
  • image/jpeg
File Name uhlib_2007_023_b014_f030_005_004.jpg
Transcript Page 4 THE OUTDOOR NATURE CLUB OF HOUSTON, TEXAS Spring, 1937 Our Texas Coastal Bird Colonies "The heavy rains and high water along the Texas coast caused considerable damage to bird life this season . . . our most important charge, the Roseate spoonbill, did not raise as many young this year due to the high water level." Thus Sanctuary Director Robert P. Allen injected a warning note in reporting, through National Association of Audubon Socities' BIRD LORE, on the 1936 survey of Texas coastal birds by Alexander Sprunt, Jr., Supervisor of Southern Sanctuaries. Other interesting information in Director Allen's report: "The presence of the Reddish Egrets nesting on the Vingtune Islands in Galveston Bay was recently reported to us by Mr. Alston Clapp, Sr. of Houston . . . This is the farthest point north and east along the Texas coast that these interesting birds have nested and it is a gratifying indication of their condition as a species. "The high tides reduced the large colony of various species located on Bird Island in West Bay, off the western tip of Galveston Island. The Reddish Egrets nested on this island for the first time last season, but only one nest was observed this year. Evidently no White Pelicans nested this year on the Texas coast. "We are indebted once more to Mr. J. J. Carroll of Houston, for his generous cooperation in connection with our survey of bird life along the major portion of the Texas coast. The Audubon Association and the birds of Texas have no greater friend than Mr. Carroll." Audubon Nature Camp "One-eighth of a mile off the picturesque coast of Maine in sheltered Mus- congus Bay is beautiful Hog Island, location of the Todd Wild Life Sanctuary. Covered with a primeval stand of evergreens, its shores laved by the waters of the Atlantic, the island is ideally situated for our nature study camp." In these words the National Association of Audubon Societies described the location of its 1937 Audubon Nature Camp for Adult Leaders in a recent announcement. Six fourteen-day camp periods will be undertaken, beginning June 11, June 25, July 9, July 23, August 6 and August 20. The primary purpose is to convey a knowledge of methods which are considered as having been successful in popularizing the study of birds, man- mals, insects, flowers, marine and other wild life. Instruction is concentrated on actual field observation. Fifty dollars is quoted as the fee for two weeks in the camp, including board, lodging, tuition and transportation on regularly scheduled field trips. Included in the announcement was this additional word-picture: "Wild life abounds here—a great variety of birds, including Eagles, Ravens, Ospreys, Great Blue Herons and an extraordinary number of song birds nest on or about the island, while on outcropping ledges and small islands in the bay one finds breeding colonies of Gulls, Terns, Eiders, Cormorants, Guillemots and Petrels. On the island grow a fascinating variety of ferns, mosses and lichens. Over five hundred kinds of wild flowers have been recorded in the vicinity. The surrounding waters literally teem with marine life; porpoises, seals and occasionally whales are observed not far off-shore." Adult leaders or other nature students interested in the camp may write the Camp Director, National Association of Audubon Societies, 1775 Broadway, New York, N. Y., for details. Roemer's "TEXAS" Translated The Texas Centennial has brought to light much of the colorful and interesting history of the State. Among the early writings, Dr. Ferdinand von Roemer's "Texas" stands unsurpassed. It was based on personal observations and presents a graphic, scientific and informative account of transitions during the State's most romantic period of existence. While studying the geological formations of Texas for the Berlin Academy of Science, the learned young scientist took occasion to scrutinize closely the pioneer, the social conditions, the Indians, and the flora and fauna of Texas. His impressions are recorded in his inimitable way. The author's sole mission in writing this book seems to have been to acquaint the foreigner with the Texas of that day. Bias and prejudice are absent from Roemer's "Texas." The book contains a geological preface by Dr. Donald C. Barton. The nine sections following deal with the location, physical characteristics, the flora and fauna, minerals, the inhabitants, the history of the German settlements, and early books on Texas. The second part, consisting of twenty-four chapters, is a travelog, relating Roemer's experience from the time he left New Orleans, November 20, 1845, bound for Texas, until he left Galveston on May 8, 1847, on his return voyage to Germany. A map of early Texas, indicating the trails, Indian villages, and many hamlets no longer in existence adds to the value of the book. Roemer's "Texas" was translated by Oswald Mueller, a member of the Outdoor Nature Club, and is now available to the reading public. The Roadrunner, or Chaparral Cock, is a curious bird of great interest to people everywhere. Though scarcer now, it has for many years been common in territory where quail and other game birds existed abundantly. To exterminate this unique species in the hope of providing better quail-shooting would be contrary to reason and an offense against the rights of many to favor the privileges of a few. More Sanctuaries Needed It is now generally recognized that the establishment of adequate reserves and sanctuaries is the keystone of effective wild life conservation po »^H| The permanent, inviolate "natural ai ,w^^ reserve is the only provision that meet— all requirements (aesthetic, recreational, economic and scientific), but this fundamental conception can not be put into operation in many instances where special action is required. The recent establishment of large Federal forests in East Texas encourages the hope that several natural area preserves, such as have been set up on suitable Federal lands elsewhere, will be designated on selected tracts within the East Texas forests. There are, however, three other situations, known to conservationists in Southeast Texas, needing special attention at the earliest possible moment. The dedication of adequate sanctuary territory to save the Attwater Prairie Chicken from the fate of the Heath Hen is an emergency need. Probably of equal importance is the fixing of a more definite and permanent status for the Vingtune lies, an area of unique scientific and historical interest. The present ar rangement whereby the Roseate Spo- bills are protected through coopera* d^M between the National Association of \ ™i^ dubon Socities and the Texas Game, F_. and Oyster Commission, is a step in the right direction and should be made the basis for future plans. The Vingtune area is distinct in its value, and deserves a permanent status in accordance therewith. There are several possible methods that might be worked out to cover fully the two cases just mentioned, and these will doubtless have the earnest consideration of sportsmen and scientific and civic groups, as well as Federal and State authorities. Comparatively few residents of Southeast Texas seem to be aware of the colorful pageant of bird life that occurs during the spring and fall migration seasons, probably because, in this section, most of the avian display follows closely the Gulf Coast shore. Wooded tangles attractive to birds are not common close to the shoreline, and where such places exist the migratory procession pauses and offers fine opportunities for observation. Such a place is a varied copse near Kemah, known to Houston ornithologists and nature lovers as "the Jungle." T spring and fall, this relatively small a a swarms with vari-colored birds of m ^^B species, and during the remainder of "™* year it has a remarkable resident pop^ lation of field, forest and shore birds. Records kept furnish ample proof of this statement, and a visit to this potential, but at present unsecured, bird haven will further confirm it. As stated in another article in this Bulletin, the preservation of this small tract in its original condition, as an outdoor laboratory and rendezvous for students and nature lovers, is a challenge to all who realize its exceptional character. sn ,l