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The Bulletin, No. 6, Second Series, Spring 1937
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The Bulletin, No. 6, Second Series, Spring 1937 - Image 3. Spring 1937. Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries. University of Houston Digital Library. Web. September 16, 2019. https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/2007_023/item/3249/show/3247.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

(Spring 1937). The Bulletin, No. 6, Second Series, Spring 1937 - Image 3. Outdoor Nature Club Newsletters. Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries. Retrieved from https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/2007_023/item/3249/show/3247

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

The Bulletin, No. 6, Second Series, Spring 1937 - Image 3, Spring 1937, Outdoor Nature Club Newsletters, Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries, accessed September 16, 2019, https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/2007_023/item/3249/show/3247.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

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Compound Item Description
Title The Bulletin, No. 6, Second Series, Spring 1937
Contributor (Local)
  • Boone, Charles B.
Publisher Outdoor Nature Club
Date Spring 1937
Subject.Topical (LCSH)
  • Ornithology
Subject.Geographic (TGN)
  • Houston, Texas
Genre (AAT)
  • newsletters
  • periodicals
Language English
Type (DCMI)
  • Text
Original Item Location ID 2007-023, Box 14, Folder 30
ArchivesSpace URI /repositories/2/archival_objects/9625
Original Collection Outdoor Nature Club Records
Digital Collection Outdoor Nature Club Newsletters
Digital Collection URL http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/2007_023
Repository Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries
Repository URL http://libraries.uh.edu/branches/special-collections/
Use and Reproduction No Copyright - United States
File Name index.cpd
Item Description
Title Image 3
Format (IMT)
  • image/jpeg
File Name uhlib_2007_023_b014_f030_005_003.jpg
Transcript Spring, 1937 THE OUTDOOR NATURE CLUB OF HOUSTON, TEXAS Page 3 __ ^■jaai ^■ani Burbank's "Harvest of the Years" As Reviewed by Ada S. Reeves k A nature lover finds Burbank's "Hardest of the Years" stimulating and thought stirring. Burbank like many great personalities was not the product of formal training. A strain in his heredity, an environment that allowed its expression; exuberance of life, untram- meled by a cut and dried curriculum, and a great regard for facts, gave us Burbank. His formative years were full of enthusiasm, initiative, curiosity, love of the plant world, plus a hoe and overalls but without Gray's botany or a microscope. Books came later and were second in his life. His school was the University of Nature. He took a seventy-year course> Later when colleges conferred degrees upon him, he said, "I can't be very much excited about being referred to as doctor, but I can be tremendously excited about giving the world a better radish or a zinnia with a new quality or color." Burbank looked upon the plant world as a laboratory full of raw material where he could collaborate with nature, feature's fundamental laws, struggle of life and reproduction, enthralled him but more than these the law of variation and adaptability thrilled him. He found that in a few plant generations he could produce that for which nature would require hundreds or thousands of years to accomplish. In nature were millions of failures and successes—trial and error. He could speed up time and eliminate many errors. When he published his June 1893 catalogue of one hundred new creations it acted as a bombshell. "Did Burbank think he was a creator?" asked the orthodox. In this catalogue were four new quinces, ten new plums and prunes, a large list of berries, a number of flowers, including the first double gladiolus ever known, and his "Silver Lining" Poppy; also vegetables of new variety.. In a statement at the end of the catalogue he says: "There is no possible room for doubt that every form of plant existing on the earth is now being and " as always been modified, more or less its surroundings and often rapidly nd permanently changed, never to return to the old form. When man takes advantage of these facts . . . the power to improve our useful and ornamental plants is limitless." There are thrills in "Harvest of the Years." A man wants 20,000 prune trees and he wants them in nine months for orchard development. No one has them but Burbank takes his order. He immediately selects fine, almond nuts, plants them in sand with a covering of burlap and a top layer of sand, that the sprout ing may be watched. When sprouted they are placed in nursery beds. After several weeks, in late June, with expert help his almond seedlings are budded with prune buds bought of a neighboring orchard. Ten days or so afterwards the tops of the almond seedlings are lightly broken but not disconnected; this, to force energy and food into the buds. By December, the required time, Burbank delivers 19,500 prune trees to his customer, much to the satisfaction of both —to Burbank for his achievement and silver jingling in his pocket, which meant more experiments. Twice in his life Burbank called a halt, right-about face on himself for alas, he was making money! It meant time and energy for the intricacies of business and commercialism. With his joy in collaborating with nature, his sense of service and achievement he couldn't afford to—just make money! jl A friend of Burbank's, John M. Emp- son, a canner, suggested that an American pea that could compete with the small, sweet, French pea was needed and would be a profitable investment. Burbank assured him that it could be produced and asked him for his order. "Gladly given, if it can be done" was the response. Burbank agreed to deliver it— in eight years. The friend was inclined to regard the affair as a joke. Since it was possible to raise two generations of peas a year in California, Burbank cut the time down to three years, six generations. The story of the details of this experiment, like many of his other experiments, is amazing for the wholesale planting, the elimination of plants, the close observation, the tireless work and infinite patience. The pea is known as the Burbank Empson. Incidentally the pea seed stock was given to his friend. The joy of friendship was a keen reality in Burbank's life. Burbank saw the laws of nature as equally applicable to men as plants. He remarks that heredity is stored environment, the foundation we build on; environment, the architect of the building we erect. The training of plants and the training of children, he assures us, are under the same laws, and he abundantly illustrates his theory. Life, he says, is electric, magnetic, a quality; positive and negative; constructive and destructive; upward swinging but with a downward drag—but not chaos. Its rays of light emitted here and there when focused give us brilliant truth, which "will persist and grow and spread, until its light will illumine all the dark pages of life and every line and precept will be clear to read and simple to understand." Creation of a National Park in the Big Bend country, along the Rio Grande, is a project that has the approval of every Texan familiar with the wonderful natural features of that section. The region measures up to National Park standards in every respect, and it is hoped that the difficulties now preventing final action will soon be ironed out. Hikers Utilize Topographic Maps (Continued from page 1) woods. In dry weather one could drive nearly to the lake. The lake has been cut in two by a large recently formed delta, the sands and silts being derived from a huge deep ravine, a veritable Grand Canyon in miniature, unlike anything else ever seen in this region. In the northwestern part of the county, especially west of Tomball, hilly topography sets in, replacing the flat plains. Elevations here reach 250 feet and more. (The highest point in the county, near the northwest tip, is 318 feet). A typical locality in these hills, lying in the angle of Spring Creek and West Montgomery road, was explored. The woods are open and soil well-drained, making for pleasant hiking in any direction. In fact, this is the finest part of the county for hiking, wealthy in everything that pertains to nature. Beautiful picnic spots are numerous. Nearer home, a woods on the north side of Buffalo Bayou, about a mile west of Post Oak road, was explored. On the ravine slopes are many tangled jungles of vegetation, though the woods are more open on level ground. A profusion of wild flowers bloom in the small open fields. Wild ferny dells occur along the tributaries of the bayou, the little streams taking winding courses around the spurs of hills. The geological formations are occasionally cemented into strong hard layers of rock. A remarkable instance of imminent stream piracy was seen, alone worth the hike. The Harris County Wild Life Federation, which is affiliated with the State Federation, is composed of representatives of the Harris County Fish and Game Protective Association, the Houston Anglers' Club, and the Outdoor Nature Club. Recent meetings of the conference have confirmed the common interests of the three member clubs, and cooperation in several important matters has resulted. These include efforts favoring a universal hunting and fishing license, delegation of more discretionary powers to the Texas Game, Fish and Oyster Commission (in order that emergencies may be promptly dealt with), and in increase- appropriation for research work at A. and M. College. Through the Harris County Federation, films on wild life conservation are being made available to schools and other interested bodies, as part of a general educational program- 0**H- John H. Baker, Executive Director of the National Association of Audubon Societies, spoke on the ideals and work of the Association in the Houston Museum of Fine Arts on the evening of January 15. The lecture, which was sponsored by the Garden Club of Houston, was heard by a large and appreciative audience. jhy^tf.