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The Bulletin, No. 6, Second Series, Spring 1937
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The Bulletin, No. 6, Second Series, Spring 1937 - Image 2. Spring 1937. Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries. University of Houston Digital Library. Web. November 21, 2019. https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/2007_023/item/3249/show/3246.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

(Spring 1937). The Bulletin, No. 6, Second Series, Spring 1937 - Image 2. Outdoor Nature Club Newsletters. Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries. Retrieved from https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/2007_023/item/3249/show/3246

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

The Bulletin, No. 6, Second Series, Spring 1937 - Image 2, Spring 1937, Outdoor Nature Club Newsletters, Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries, accessed November 21, 2019, https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/2007_023/item/3249/show/3246.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

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Compound Item Description
Title The Bulletin, No. 6, Second Series, Spring 1937
Contributor (Local)
  • Boone, Charles B.
Publisher Outdoor Nature Club
Date Spring 1937
Subject.Topical (LCSH)
  • Ornithology
Subject.Geographic (TGN)
  • Houston, Texas
Genre (AAT)
  • newsletters
  • periodicals
Language English
Type (DCMI)
  • Text
Original Item Location ID 2007-023, Box 14, Folder 30
ArchivesSpace URI /repositories/2/archival_objects/9625
Original Collection Outdoor Nature Club Records
Digital Collection Outdoor Nature Club Newsletters
Digital Collection URL http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/2007_023
Repository Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries
Repository URL http://libraries.uh.edu/branches/special-collections/
Use and Reproduction No Copyright - United States
File Name index.cpd
Item Description
Title Image 2
Format (IMT)
  • image/jpeg
File Name uhlib_2007_023_b014_f030_005_002.jpg
Transcript Page 2 THE OUTDOOR NATURE CLUB OF HOUSTON, TEXAS Spring, 193T THE OUTDOOR NATURE CLUB OF HOUSTON, TEXAS Organized 1928 Affiliated with National Association of Audubon Societies OFFICERS, SPRING, 1937 OSWALD MUELLER, President. ROBERT VINES, First Vice-President. LOUIS DESJARDINS, Second Vice-President. CHAS. B. BOONE, Corresponding Secretary. W. H. POWELL, Recording Secretary. MISS MARGUERITE FITZGERALD, Treasurer. MRS. EDNA W. MINER, Parliamentarian. MISS TILLIE SCHMIDT, Custodian. EXECUTIVE BOARD All officers and J. M. Heiser, Jr. Anyone interested in the objects of the Club may make application for membership on a card provided for that purpose, signed by the applicant and one member of the Club, and accompanied by membership fee for the current year. MEMBERSHIP FEES Active Member.... $ 1.00 Life Member $50.00 This Bulletin is No. 6, Second Series. Through error the Spring, 1935, issue of the Bulletin was marked "No. 7 Second Series." It should have been identified as No. 5, Second Series. Correspondence regarding this Bulletin may be addressed to Chas. B. Boone, 2524 Cragmont Street, Houston, Texas. OBJECTS OP THE OLT/B To make stronger the bond of friendly understanding that exists among all lovers of Nature. To study our local flora and fauna- and work for the preservation of all useful and interesting forms. . To encourage hiking and interest in the outdoors as a source of health and inspiration. REGULAR MEETINGS AND OUTINGS Regular meetings of the Club are held on the third Thursday of each month (except June, July and August) at 8 p. m. in the Public Library, and it is the occasion for an educational lecture, an exhibition of nature films, or some similar formal feature. Club outings are open to all members and to visitors who are willing to follow the few simple rules observed by all similar clubs. STANDING COMMITTEES Membership: Miss Marguerite Fitzgerald; Mrs. Adele Harrison; Arthur Lefevre, Jr. Conservation: J. M. Heiser, Jr.; Miss Mabe! Cassel; Mrs. Susan Cottrell. Program : Mrs. Edna Miner ; W. H. Powell; Robert A. Vines. Outing: Louis Desjardins; Mrs. Frances Harrison ; R. L. Padgett. Publicity: Chas. B. Boone ; Mrs. Ada S. Reeves: R. A. Selle. Let's Visit the Club Custodian Colored slides of many ramifications of nature study, odd rocks, pictures reminiscent of "the good old days," bulletins, nature books, and curiosities galore were piled high on Miss Tillie Schmidt's large table. The Club custodian had invited the Arts Committee to plan means of making club properties more useful to the membership. A special committee was appointed to dispose of out-dated items. A prize possession which new members will thoroughly enjoy seeing projected is two hundred feet of 16 m.m. film on bird life on Vingtune Island. Visions of many pseudo jaunts which club members can take at odd moments were prompted by sight of the custodian's library of books. The Bulletin gladly satiates the reader's curiosity about the titles and authors of some of the books but it is up to the individual to do his own foraging by calling at 2359 South Shepherd Drive, where Miss Schmidt will cordially assist him. Official Guide—The New York Zoological Park, by William T. Hornaday, ScD. High Country, The Rockies Yesterday and Today, by Courtney Ryler Cooper. Rainbow Bridge, by Charles L. Bern- heimer. On the Roof of the Rockies, by Lewis R. Freeman. Trees and Shrubs of California Gardens, by Charles Francis Saunders. A Tropical Tramp with the Tourists, by Harry Foster. Constructive Forestry for the Private Owner, by J. J. Crumley, Ph.D. The Boys' Book of Canoeing, by Elon Jessup. Camping Out, by Warren H. Miller. The Twin Grizzlies of Admiralty Island, by John M. Holzworth. Bobbie—A Great Collie, by Charles Alexander. The Meadows, by John C. Van Dyke. Marble's Round the World Travel Guide, by Fred E. Marble, Ph.D. Birds of God, by Theron Brown. Field Book of Birds of Southwestern States, by Luther E. Wyman and Elizabeth F. Burnell. Key to North American Birds, by Elliott Cones. Tarantula Versus Tarantula Killer (Continued from page 1) the wasp always managed to elude its grasp. The tarantula killer now changed tactics. It spun around in dizzy circles, evidently trying to tire and confuse its victim. The tarantula tried to keep pace with its agile antagonist, but soon its movements became slower, for the poison of the first sting was taking effect. Finally it raised itself to ward off another attack. Quick as a flash the wasp sank its long sting into the breast again. This must have struck a vital spot, for the movements of the spider became perceptibly weaker. The wasp now became bolder and stung the spider repeatedly. Soon the tarantula sank to the ground, an inert heap, and only the quivering body and the spasmodic movement of the legs betrayed that it was not dead but in a stupor. The battle had lasted about five minutes. When it was over, the tarantula killer actually seemed to gloat over its victory, for it strutted about, flapped its wings, and in general acted like a cock in a barnyard who had gained the supremacy by whipping all rivals. From time to time it would inspect its victim, probably to make sure that it was still helpless. Since the tarantula was an unusually large specimen, I decided to add it to my collection. But I had reckoned without the victor to whom the spoils belonged rightfully. When I tried to place it into a box, the wasp turned fiercely upon me, and I am confident it would have attacked me, had I persisted in my efforts. What About Our Prairie Chickens? In the spring of 1930, a lone surviving heath cock appeared regularly at its traditional courting place on the island ofl Marthas Vineyard, Massachusetts, and faithfully "boomed" in a last forlorn effort to attract a mate. Seen for the last time in March, 1932, it is safe to say that he was the last gallant fighter against extermination of his species. Strange it is to recall the legend that Boston laborers and servants once stipulated with their masters that the heath hen would be served on their table no more than a few times a week! Is the heath hen's cousin, the prairie chicken of the Texas and Louisiana coast, about to meet the same fate? In the memories of young men are recalled the "boom-a-boom" of the strutting males in fantastic, colorful courting scenes enacted by twenty, thirty and even fifty of these unusual birds, out on the prairies near Houston, on crisp spring mornings. "Hunters from Houston used to come out here just to see how many prairie chickens they could kill" said a Rosenberg man recently in lamenting the growing scarcity of the prized fowl in Fort Bend County pastures. No one really wants to see the prairie chicken exterminated. The startling^ whirr of the bird's wings as it arises | gives the hunter a thrill. Those interested in the meat as a food will find it is tender, juicy, delicious. From May to October the prairie chicken eats insects and grasshoppers that harass the farmer, and during the remainder of the year it seeks leaves, flowers, seeds and grain. Those who are anxious to preserve for America all of its rich inheritance of natural life see in the prairie chicken one of the most important game birds of the nation. Even with the guns of the hunter mercifully silenced the prairie chicken is having an increasingly difficult fight to survive. Converting prairie lands into fields has destroyed their covers and their natural foods. Man has brought with him cats, rats and roving dogs that kill the young. Prairie fires and floods take their toll. Sportsmen, farmers and just plain citizens with concern for the natural resources of their country should join in demanding that every effort be made to help the prairie chicken replenish its numbers. Certainly it should not be legal to shoot prairie chickens in Texas for a number of seasons; and certainly those in the rural areas should cooperate to^ protect the birds in rearing their young.™ Unless drastic action is taken—watch out—for the prairie chicken will suffer the fate of the heath hen within a few years! Outstanding in last autumn's activities was the meeting of Nature Club members and their friends at J. M. Heiser's Kemah cottage. It was during the height of the migration season and many warblers rarely seen here were identified.