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The Spoonbill, Vol. 38, No. 1, January 1989
Image 8
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The Spoonbill, Vol. 38, No. 1, January 1989 - Image 8. January 1989. Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries. University of Houston Digital Library. Web. November 13, 2019. https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/2007_023/item/3187/show/3186.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

(January 1989). The Spoonbill, Vol. 38, No. 1, January 1989 - Image 8. Outdoor Nature Club Newsletters. Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries. Retrieved from https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/2007_023/item/3187/show/3186

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

The Spoonbill, Vol. 38, No. 1, January 1989 - Image 8, January 1989, Outdoor Nature Club Newsletters, Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries, accessed November 13, 2019, https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/2007_023/item/3187/show/3186.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

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Title The Spoonbill, Vol. 38, No. 1, January 1989
Alternative Title The Spoonbill, Vol. XXXVIII, No. 1, January 1989
Contributor (Local)
  • Price, Libby
Publisher Outdoor Nature Club
Date January 1989
Subject.Topical (LCSH)
  • Ornithology
Subject.Geographic (TGN)
  • Houston, Texas
Genre (AAT)
  • newsletters
  • periodicals
Language English
Type (DCMI)
  • Text
Original Item Location ID 2007-023, Box 12, Folder 5
ArchivesSpace URI /repositories/2/archival_objects/9874
Original Collection Outdoor Nature Club Records
Digital Collection Outdoor Nature Club Newsletters
Digital Collection URL http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/2007_023
Repository Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries
Repository URL http://libraries.uh.edu/branches/special-collections/
Use and Reproduction Rights Undetermined
File Name index.cpd
Item Description
Title Image 8
Format (IMT)
  • image/jpeg
File Name uhlib_2007_023_b012_f005_001_008.jpg
Transcript WHAT A B-I-I-I-G HUMMINGBIRD by Margaret Jones Last winter a neighbor of several blocks away called to ask Paul and me to come identify a bird which was coming to her hummingbird feeder. Paul couldn't go at that time, but, guessing it would be an oriole, I hastened to her house. I waited less than forty minutes, and when the bird appeared, I was delighted to see a first-year male Bullock's Oriole. Bullock's Orioles don't come my way very often; usually it is Baltimores and Orchards that we see in the mulberry tree in the yard in back of us. We had seen orioles at Santa Ana Refuge feeding from hummingbird feeders a number of years ago. We had two hummingbird feeders up this summer because we so enjoyed the feisty antics of quite a few Ruby-throats. In fact we put the second one up to try to cut down on the chases, but found it just ran the dominant hummer a little more ragged! We usually put up feeders to try to entice the wintering hummers but rarely get anything other than Rufous. The wonderful exception to that was the Broad-tailed Hummingbird that spent a month and a half in our back yard (see The Spoonbill, May , 1976), and is represented on our current checklist by two connected dots; at that time it was supposed to be the first record of a live Broad- tailed on the Upper Texas Coast. A week before Christmas I was shocked to see a full adult male Bullock's Oriole clutching the little glass tube of one of our feeders and twisting itself around to drink the juice. He is beautiful, a real textbook bird, and when the female, also a textbook bird, appeared a few days later, my joy was complete. I have such fun watching them and their contortions I have a hard time getting some necessary letter writing done. They come at various times all during the day, though more often during the morning. The male will perch on top of the red tulip on the larger feeder and bend down to drink, while the female sits on the perch in front of the tulip and bends double to get her beak in position. They could drink through the bee guards, but when I removed one they soon concentrated on that opening. They seem to have no trouble drinking through the bee guard on the smaller feeder. The male sometimes doesn't seem to want the female to eat at the first table, and drives her away from both feeders for just a short while, and then allows her to feed at whichever one he doesn't fancy at the moment. Sometimes they sit on the fence a few inches apart, and what a picture that makes! Recently they had been coming about every 15 minutes, and I called John Barnes to come video-tape them. Wouldn't you know they didn't appear for more than two hours, and only came back an hour after John had left? And so goes the world of the bird photographer. I haven't had any hummers yet this winter, but for sheer enjoyment these Bullock's Orioles will be hard to beat. And come to think about it, do you think they will consider the hummers intruders and drive them away? DANGEROUS BIRDING Readers of Birdwatcher's Digest have surely noticed that the article, "A Cautionary Tale," in the January-February issue, was written by Sherry L. Collins of Lake Jackson. (Sherry and Tom Collins are very kind about letting OG members see their hummingbirds each year.) The article describes some hairy situations Sherry has faced when birding, such as going out on the Freeport jetty during a gale, and warns against a too-avid pursuit of birds, regardless of danger. Congratulations, Sherry, on your fine article! THE SPOONBILL STAFF Editor Assistant Editor Clearing House Editors: Gottschling, Rene Wally Gardner Layout Artist Typing Labels Mailing Checklist Committee Noel Libby Price Ellen Red Lynne Aldrich and Peter and Andrew Franks, and Connie Clark Libby Price Peggy Milstead Connie Schimbor Ted Eubanks, Jr. Pettingell and Jim Morgan ORNITHOLOGY GROUP (Outdoor Nature Club) c/o Peggy Milstead 10810 Burdine Houston, Texas 77096 (RETURN POSTAGE GUARANTEED) SOLICITED MAIL TIME SENSITIVE MATERIAL DO NOT DELAY Nonprofit Org U.S. Postage PAID Houston, Texas Permit No. 1063