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The Spoonbill, Vol. 38, No. 9, September 1989
Image 7
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The Spoonbill, Vol. 38, No. 9, September 1989 - Image 7. September 1989. Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries. University of Houston Digital Library. Web. June 20, 2021. https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/2007_023/item/3178/show/3176.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

(September 1989). The Spoonbill, Vol. 38, No. 9, September 1989 - Image 7. Outdoor Nature Club Newsletters. Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries. Retrieved from https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/2007_023/item/3178/show/3176

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

The Spoonbill, Vol. 38, No. 9, September 1989 - Image 7, September 1989, Outdoor Nature Club Newsletters, Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries, accessed June 20, 2021, https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/2007_023/item/3178/show/3176.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

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Title The Spoonbill, Vol. 38, No. 9, September 1989
Alternative Title The Spoonbill, Vol. XXXVIII, No. 9, September 1989
Contributor (Local)
  • Price, Libby
Publisher Outdoor Nature Club
Date September 1989
Subject.Topical (LCSH)
  • Ornithology
Subject.Geographic (TGN)
  • Houston, Texas
Genre (AAT)
  • newsletters
  • periodicals
Language English
Type (DCMI)
  • Text
Original Item Location ID 2007-023, Box 12, Folder 5
ArchivesSpace URI /repositories/2/archival_objects/9874
Original Collection Outdoor Nature Club Records
Digital Collection Outdoor Nature Club Newsletters
Digital Collection URL http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/2007_023
Repository Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries
Repository URL http://libraries.uh.edu/branches/special-collections/
Use and Reproduction In Copyright
File Name index.cpd
Item Description
Title Image 7
Format (IMT)
  • image/jpeg
File Name uhlib_2007_023_b012_f005_008_007.jpg
Transcript BLACK-WHISKERED VIREO 8/20/89 Peter Gottschling/Lynne Aldrich The bird vas originally in the dense mixed oak forest near the creek (ditch) in a thin tall oak about 35 feet high in an open canopy. From there it moved through the trees in long bursts always remaining in the middle to upper canopy. It flew to the edge of the woods and spent about 5 minutes in a 45 foot Sycamore and then flew around finally staying at least 10 minutes singing and not moving in the upper middle canopy of a 40 foot Ash. The bird first came to notice because of its loud continuous singing which did not sound like a Red-eyed or any other vireo. It was very sedentary and one had to wait quite a while to locate it from its movements. Instead of moving steadily from tree to tree it made long flights to trees 20 or 30 yards apart. It did this several times and we could only follow it because of its singing. After arriving in a tree it would start to sing but it did not move around much. When it did feed it sometimes hover-gleened quickly and then fed on a branch in one spot. In the final place ve observed it it sat on a branch for 10 minutes singing constantly but we could not see it until the end of that time. It was in a fairly exposed branch the entire time without any movement. The bird was a large vireo which looked bulkier and larger and longer billed than a Red-eyed. From underneath you could see black malars coming back along the edge of the chin from the bill. The chin area vas pale gray and contrasted vith the grayish breast and belly and there vere smudgy streaks along the flanks. The most striking mark vas the sharply demarcated greenish-yellow undertail coverts vhich vere bordered by a distinct dark line across the vent and stopped abruptly at the base of the tail. There was no other hint of yellow anywhere.else on the bird. The tail feathers were generally dark but the outer retrices were pale gray from underneath and the central retrices were missing giving the tail a disheveled notched almost forked appearance. Almost all views of the bird vere from below so I did not see the crown at all. The wings were a darker gray-brown and contrasted with the light underparts. There were no wingbars or light edging on the wing coverts. The plumage, except for the undertail, looked very old and worn. The back vas about the same color as the vings. The face vas gray on the chin above the malars slightly darker than the chin* There vas a black line from the bill back through the eye and beyond with a wide pale supercillium above it. I did not see beyond this area of the head. BLACK-WHISKERED VIREO 8/20/89 Mike Austin One presumable male (based on singing) in moulting plumage observed on West side of Smith Oaks Bird Santuary, High Island Galveston County by Mike Austin, Lynne Aldrich and Peter Gottschling using 7 x 42 binoculars, distance of 20 - 50 feet. Observed for five minutes at one time in tall shade trees (live oak, sycamore, pecan). Head: Gray crown demarcated below by heavy black line. Creamy supercillium defined by inferior margin of cap and superior margin of cheek. Cheek dark gray bordered above by thin black line running from lores through eye to super-posteriour edge of cheeck. Antero-interior border of cheek defined by heavy black malar ling forming two "whiskers*1 on either side of throat. Bil1: Heavy, gray, blunt. Underparts: Chin, throat, breast, belly white. Vent yellow, sharbply separated from lover belly by dark line. Flanks vhitish. Wings & Back: unmarkd, greenish gray. Tail: concolor vith back. Unmarked. Central retrix missing. Behavior: Very deliberate. Sat motinoless in caopy for 10 minutes straight singing in pecan approximately 40 feet up. Hade short flights from tree to tree, very few foraging moves once assuming new venue. Voice: Critical characterstic and is what drew us to investigate the songster at first. Slow, short melodious varble vith short doublets or triplets (latter preferred). Third note of triplet either higher or lower than first two, in random sequence. Richer, fuller than Red-Eyed, with fever doubltes (Red-Eyed heard vithin 10 feet of first bird). Song more like Solitary in quality than Red-Eyed. - Called for 15 - 20 minutes during 50 minutes of intermittent visualization. Loud song, carried veil, helped locate bird. Black "whiskers" and yellow vent eliminated breeding plumaged Red-Eyed. Red-eyed seen same day had gray vents, much paler faces and song was different. CLEARING HOUSE CODES AAG - Aldrich, Austin, Gottschling AG - Aldrich, Gottschling BH » Bob Honig BM « Bill McClure CH - Fred Collins, Bob Honig CR5 » C. Bourgeous, R. Uzar, S. Griffing PG DM PM Derek Muschalek Peggy Milstead FU * Joe Farrell, R. uzar GL ~ Geneva LaVern MBM - Mary Ann and Bob Moore MBT - D. Muschalek, D. M. Brovn Rob Thacker Peter Gottschling RC - C. Bourgeous, R. Uzar RU - Richard Uzar In general the song vas a slightly slurred tvo or three part vhistle of medium tone, quite rich and much louder than nearby singing Red-eyed Vireos. Perhaps about the same pitch as a House Sparrow (P. domesticus) chirp. The song was sort of a slurred "sweet sweet" or "sweet sweet...sweet". The second syllable was usually lover than the first and after a slight pause the third syllable vas sometimes lover or higher than the second part. When the bird started singing it had only brief pauses betveen calls and sometimes ran them closely together. It vas more varied than a Solitary Vireo song and called more continuously. Red-eyed Vireo does not have malars and its song is not as rich and varied. The black line through the eye eliminates Warbling Vireo. The overall gray appearance should discount Yellow-throated Vireo. The large size and song remove Hutton's from consideration and lack of spectacles or lores rule out Solitary and White-eyed vireos. PITTMAN PARK BIRD WALKS Dr. Richard Goldfarb will lead two bird walks at Pittman Park, located at Newcastle and Evergreen in Bellaire. Participants should arrive at 7:30 a.m. to look for fall migrants. Some good warblers are found here each year.