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The Spoonbill, Vol. 38, No. 9, September 1989
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The Spoonbill, Vol. 38, No. 9, September 1989 - Image 2. September 1989. Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries. University of Houston Digital Library. Web. June 20, 2021. https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/2007_023/item/3178/show/3171.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

(September 1989). The Spoonbill, Vol. 38, No. 9, September 1989 - Image 2. Outdoor Nature Club Newsletters. Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries. Retrieved from https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/2007_023/item/3178/show/3171

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

The Spoonbill, Vol. 38, No. 9, September 1989 - Image 2, September 1989, Outdoor Nature Club Newsletters, Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries, accessed June 20, 2021, https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/2007_023/item/3178/show/3171.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

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Title The Spoonbill, Vol. 38, No. 9, September 1989
Alternative Title The Spoonbill, Vol. XXXVIII, No. 9, September 1989
Contributor (Local)
  • Price, Libby
Publisher Outdoor Nature Club
Date September 1989
Subject.Topical (LCSH)
  • Ornithology
Subject.Geographic (TGN)
  • Houston, Texas
Genre (AAT)
  • newsletters
  • periodicals
Language English
Type (DCMI)
  • Text
Original Item Location ID 2007-023, Box 12, Folder 5
ArchivesSpace URI /repositories/2/archival_objects/9874
Original Collection Outdoor Nature Club Records
Digital Collection Outdoor Nature Club Newsletters
Digital Collection URL http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/2007_023
Repository Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries
Repository URL http://libraries.uh.edu/branches/special-collections/
Use and Reproduction In Copyright
File Name index.cpd
Item Description
Title Image 2
Format (IMT)
  • image/jpeg
File Name uhlib_2007_023_b012_f005_008_002.jpg
Transcript by Noel Pettingell 10 YEARS AGO/FROM SEPT., 1979 SPOONBILL "Around and About ** An interesting commentary on man's effect on birds was made by James Vardaman: 'A reporter who recently interviewed me thought that man's effect on birds had been completely adverse, and asked me if I had noticed it. I'm not sure about man's total impact on birds, but it is clear that he has created ideal habitats for many species and caused great concentrations of them. The Bohemian Waxwings are abundant in Edmonton because food is plentiful on ornamental trees and shrubs there; they are much less numerous outside the city. White-necked Ravens, Mexican Crows and several gulls occur in great numbers at the city dump of Brownsville, Texas, and dumps and sewage plants are favorite birding spots everywhere. The geese and ducks I got in Oklahoma, Texas and Colorado were there because man, in one way or another, kept the water from freezing; the Spotted Oriole can't make it anywhere except among the lawns and gardens of Florida cities. Even in the Patagonia-Sonoita Creek Sanctuary in Arizona, the abandoned railroad bed and the tangle of brush under the adjacent telephone lines are the best places for some species and increase the variety of habitats offered by the sanctuary. Man and some birds certainly get along well together*"' Note: James M. Vardaman, who lives in Jackson, Mississippi, established a new all-time record of 699 species within the ABA Area (North America north of Mexico) during a single year, 1979, and a new all-time world record of 2,800 species in 1984. OUR LIBRARY NOW TRAVELS! When the OG moved its meetings to the Bay- land Park Community Center, there was concern about the library, because we had no storage space there such as we had at Bayou Manor. An innovative solution was provided by Don Richardson, who with his wife, Lee, took over as Resources Chairmen. Don, who works on carpentry the way he works on birding, constructed a rolling library bookcase that fits into his station wagon and can be brought to meetings. We all benefit from Don's excellent workmanship and dedication to the group. Be sure to offer your thanks to Don when you borrow from the library. Just saying, "Thanks!" here is hardly sufficient. We also owe thanks to Lee for the new list of library books we received at the meeting. TEXAS ORNITHOLOGICAL SOCIETY MEETING The Texas Ornithological Society will meet in San Antonio October 26-29. There are always interesting seminars and local birding trips. If you are not now a member and wish to join, there are always application blanks at the literature table, or call Richard Uzar at 527-0454. (continued from page 1 ) for a starter concentrate on the idea of small study groups. When I say study groups, the image of a few ' people sitting around a kitchen table comes to mind. It doesn't have to be a kitchen table; it could be in a library, a local pub, a museum or a laboratory. It needn't be indoors; it could be at the beach, or a marsh, in the woods or a meadow. The place matters not—the interest, and most importantly the willingness we have to study some specific area of birding is what's important. The possible topics are limitless: identification of problem groups like sparrows or shorebirds, plumage variations in a particular species or genus of the gulls or raptors, breeding behavior, habitat preferences, feeding habits/food requirements, or biology. This list could go on and on. It probably will, too, because I may not have hit on your favorite topic of interest yet. Whatever your particular leaning you can bet someone else is similarly inclined. Obviously a group working together will accomplish more than one individual working alone. In addition there is a momentum established by a group that any one of us alone would be hard pressed to create. You need not be any kind of expert to begin participating in or leading the study of one such group. We do, of course, have eminently qualified local experts who will be willing to assist and help direct the serious group of OG students. While there are many advantages to group activity there is no shortage of drawbacks either. I live in Friendswood, you live in Kingwood; you work days, I work nights and so on. There will be difficulties to work out, but they can be worked out if we are willing to go the extra mile to accomplish the goal. Learning about birds doesn't happen by osmosis; it is through the work of study that we grow in understanding. The benefits from these group efforts hold promise for all of us. The results of these studies could be shared with the OG through articles in The Spoonbill. Some groups may wish to present their findings through meeting programs or field trips, and someone may even find a way to excite the general public about some aspect of birds through their study. The possibilities are limited only by our imagination. Are you willing to give a little extra to our OG while gaining knowledge in your area of interest in birds? Give this some thought, then call or drop a note through the mail to share your idea. I'll be talking more about this at the October meeting and hope to hear from you in the meantime. Richard Uzar, Chairman... 3421 Mt. Vernon 77006-3830 Phone 527-0454 PWWS BIRD SEED SALE The Piney Woods Wildlife Society will hold its yearly sale of bird seed October 12-18. Seed may be ordered at this time by calling: Liz McCarty at 440-0843; Martha Branam at 443-1447; or Irma Williams at 353-7661 (All 713 area numbers). Pickup date at North Harris County College will be announced. The PWWS bird seed is this year's crop of quality seed.