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The Spoonbill, Vol. 13, No. 5, September 1964
Image 5
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The Spoonbill, Vol. 13, No. 5, September 1964 - Image 5. September 1964. Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries. University of Houston Digital Library. Web. June 23, 2021. https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/2007_023/item/3143/show/3139.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

(September 1964). The Spoonbill, Vol. 13, No. 5, September 1964 - Image 5. Outdoor Nature Club Newsletters. Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries. Retrieved from https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/2007_023/item/3143/show/3139

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

The Spoonbill, Vol. 13, No. 5, September 1964 - Image 5, September 1964, Outdoor Nature Club Newsletters, Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries, accessed June 23, 2021, https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/2007_023/item/3143/show/3139.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

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Title The Spoonbill, Vol. 13, No. 5, September 1964
Alternative Title The Spoonbill, Vol. XIII, No. 5, September 1964
Contributor (Local)
  • Ellis, Pat
  • Ellis, Jim
Publisher Outdoor Nature Club
Date September 1964
Subject.Topical (LCSH)
  • Ornithology
Subject.Geographic (TGN)
  • Houston, Texas
Genre (AAT)
  • newsletters
  • periodicals
Language English
Type (DCMI)
  • Text
Original Item Location ID 2007-023, Box 9, Folder 24
ArchivesSpace URI /repositories/2/archival_objects/9849
Original Collection Outdoor Nature Club Records
Digital Collection Outdoor Nature Club Newsletters
Digital Collection URL http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/2007_023
Repository Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries
Repository URL http://libraries.uh.edu/branches/special-collections/
Use and Reproduction No Copyright - United States
File Name index.cpd
Item Description
Title Image 5
Format (IMT)
  • image/jpeg
File Name uhlib_2007_023_b009_f024_009_005.jpg
Transcript interesting and helpful to all who have trouble remembering songs. Her naive descriptions of their technical difficulties are delightful. The most interesting thing about the story is that this is the story of two persons who started with a hobby and ended by making a distinctly valuable contribution to the sciences through that hobby. WELDER FIELD TRIP The O.G. field trip to the Welder Wildlife Foundation will be Saturday, November 7th. The gate to the foundation is on the east side of U.S. highway 77, approximately 7.4 miles northeast of Sinton, or 11 miles southwest of Woodsboro. The meeting place for the trip will be the foundation gate at 8:00 on the seventh. The trip will consist of a tour of the foundation and a slide lecture. The exact timing of the tour is still to be firmed up, but a tenative schedule is: birding in the morning and afternoon with the slide lecture held at noon during the lunch break. Since someone must meet us at the gate to let us in (the gate is kept locked), it is important that the whole group be there at the appointed time. The tour director of the foundation has recommended the Roadrunner Motel in Sinton. BIG BEND TRIP Jim Ellis We made a quick trip through west Texas, including Big Bend, from August 29 through September 8. We had a total trip list of 119 with 18 lifers for Pat and 16 lifers for me. Some of the birds seen were: Black-crested Titmouse, Golden-fronted Woodpecker, Black-capped Chickadee, Lesser Goldfinch, Bewick's Wren, Brown Towhee, Scrub Jay, Ladder-backed Woodpecker, Turkey, Vermilion Flycatcher, Acorn Woodpecker, Rufous-crowned Sparrow, Black-throated Sparrow, Zone- tailed Hawk, Canon Wren, Black Phoebe, Cassin's Sparrow, White-winged Dove, Pyrrhuloxia, Lark Bunting, Western Wood Pewee, Scaled Quail, Scott's Oriole, Say's Phoebe, Verdin, Black-headed Grosbeak, Rock Wren, Mexican jay, Curve-billed Thrasher, Townsend's Warbler, Western Tanager, Broad-tailed Hummingbird, Black-tailed Gnateateher, Ground Dove, Lazuli Bunting, Varied Bunting, Hepatic Tanager, Lesser Nighthawk, White-necked Raven, Common Raven, Poor-Will, Western Meadowlark, Northern Phalarope, Burrowing Owl, Yellow-headed Blackbird. Some of the most exciting birds were not lifers, and in fact, were not new birds at all, but were interesting to find in the area. In Big Bend Park we found two male Dickcissels, a Spotted Sandpiper, a male Lazuli Bunting, and a Louisiana Waterthrush. According to the Big Bend checklist, the first three species named above are rare in the area and the fourth had never before occurred in Big Bend. The abundance notations of this checklist are based upon records that are available in the park naturalist's office. These records are the records of the park personnel and birders who have been interested enough to send their lists to the office of the naturalist. If the Big Bend area was birded as intensively as some of the more populated areas of the state, there would probably be extensive revisions to the checklist. We are particularly proud of the Louisiana Waterthrush since this bird is listed as accidental in Peterson's Western Guide. The bird was under close observation for more than one hour and could have been watched longer if we had not long since satisfied ourselves as to the identification. We found the bird at a small pool of water at Oak Creek, an oasis in the middle of the Big Bend desert. The bird could be approached within 10 feet and when flushed by the flushers, the flushee would always return within a few minutes. The bird had the clear white eyestripe and breast of the Louisiana Waterthrush, but since there are races of the Northern Waterthrush, more common in this area, which have these attributes, we especially careful to note that the bird had a clear, unmarked throat which is diagnostic of the Louisiana Waterthrush. The lifers we enjoyed the most were the Zone-tailed Hawk and the Acorn Woodpecker. We got both of them about 20-30 miles west of Kerrville. We saw plenty of Acorn Woodpeckers later, but this is a relatively eastern occurrence for this species. The only hawks we saw^were a pair who circled low above us near the Sabinal Canyon. They were low enough for us to see the yellow legs and the white, black tipped bill.