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The Spoonbill, Vol. 13, No. 5, September 1964
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The Spoonbill, Vol. 13, No. 5, September 1964 - Image 4. September 1964. Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries. University of Houston Digital Library. Web. June 20, 2021. https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/2007_023/item/3143/show/3138.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

(September 1964). The Spoonbill, Vol. 13, No. 5, September 1964 - Image 4. Outdoor Nature Club Newsletters. Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries. Retrieved from https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/2007_023/item/3143/show/3138

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

The Spoonbill, Vol. 13, No. 5, September 1964 - Image 4, September 1964, Outdoor Nature Club Newsletters, Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries, accessed June 20, 2021, https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/2007_023/item/3143/show/3138.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

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Compound Item Description
Title The Spoonbill, Vol. 13, No. 5, September 1964
Alternative Title The Spoonbill, Vol. XIII, No. 5, September 1964
Contributor (Local)
  • Ellis, Pat
  • Ellis, Jim
Publisher Outdoor Nature Club
Date September 1964
Subject.Topical (LCSH)
  • Ornithology
Subject.Geographic (TGN)
  • Houston, Texas
Genre (AAT)
  • newsletters
  • periodicals
Language English
Type (DCMI)
  • Text
Original Item Location ID 2007-023, Box 9, Folder 24
ArchivesSpace URI /repositories/2/archival_objects/9849
Original Collection Outdoor Nature Club Records
Digital Collection Outdoor Nature Club Newsletters
Digital Collection URL http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/2007_023
Repository Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries
Repository URL http://libraries.uh.edu/branches/special-collections/
Use and Reproduction No Copyright - United States
File Name index.cpd
Item Description
Title Image 4
Format (IMT)
  • image/jpeg
File Name uhlib_2007_023_b009_f024_009_004.jpg
Transcript FALL MIGRATION STUDY This is a request for the continuation of a cooperative quantitative study of the fall migration begun in 1962. From this study I hope that some general conclusions regarding fall migration routes may be reached when sufficient data are on hand....I truly hope that you will be able to participate. . .this year. In fact, I hope that many of you have already kept numerical records as far back as July, despite my tardiness in sending out this request. After two years on this project, the greatest need is for data outside Florida, especially on the Texas coast. For the benefit of those who did not participate in this project last fall it should be said that the methods of recording data are fairly simple. Field trips should be made to various areas of differing habitat-types throughout the period of the fall migration. Such a period is difficult to define, but for species which winter south of the United States it may be arbitrarily limited by the dates of July 15 and November 15. In each region more data should fall near the height of the migration (mid-October?) than during the earlier or latter parts. Any amount of data will be welcomed; if you sent only a single list it might be augmented by other contributions from the same general region. Two essential bits of information needed for each field list are; (1) net time afield, and (2) numbers of individuals for all species recorded (i.e., whether resident or migratory). Information regarding weather is welcomed but not required. Thus the methods are similar to those used in making Christmas counts, but less information is called for. I shall be happy to supply any cooperator with forms on which his lists may be transcribed, although it will prove necessary in most regions for the observer to write in additional names of birds. Please request these forms if you wish to use them, indication about how many trips you anticipate making this year. One copy can accomodate more than twenty lists. At the end of the period, i.e., in late November, these lists should be mailed to me at (the address below). If any of you care to place restrictions on the use of your data in any publication later resulting from this study, please let me know. It is most unlikely that any conclusions will be published until the study has proceeded for several years. Another aspect of the study of the fall migration will consist of comparing the extreme arrival and departure dates of migrants in different regions. Unlike the case with quantitative data, there are often published sources which provide this information. If any of you know of sources which might easily be overlooked, I should appreciate information about them. Copies of obscure publications of this nature will be gratefully received, as will your own unpublished records along with those of others whom you consider reliable. Finally, all contributors may be assured that their help will be deeply appreciated. In the event of a published paper, it will be fully acknowledged. Henry M. Stevenson, Assoc. Prof. Of Zoology, The Florida State University, Tallahassee, Florida BOOK REVIEW Bird Songs by Norma Stillwell, Published by Doubleday & Company, Inc., Garden City, New York. 194 pp., $4.95 In March of 1948, Jerry Stillwell, technical editor for the American Petroleum Institute, bought a tape recorder to record music from his radio receiver. When Jerry retired later that year from the API, that tape recorder and the Stillwell interest in birds caused them to embark on a post-retirement project that has benefited bird fanciers. Norma Stillwell describes the technical, geographical, and ornithological adventures.(and misadventures) that resulted in their three published records of bird songs, Bird Songs of Dooryard, Field and Forest. Vol. I, Vol. II, Vol. III. This is a good book from many points of view. The narrative style is interesting and the book is easy and enjoyable reading. In addition to the stories of the birds, there is a detailed account of the flora encountered on every bird recording trip. Mrs. Stillwell's description of bird songs will be **_.- «3*&»-