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The Spoonbill, Vol. 13, No. 5, September 1964
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The Spoonbill, Vol. 13, No. 5, September 1964 - Image 2. September 1964. Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries. University of Houston Digital Library. Web. June 23, 2021. https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/2007_023/item/3143/show/3136.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

(September 1964). The Spoonbill, Vol. 13, No. 5, September 1964 - Image 2. Outdoor Nature Club Newsletters. Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries. Retrieved from https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/2007_023/item/3143/show/3136

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

The Spoonbill, Vol. 13, No. 5, September 1964 - Image 2, September 1964, Outdoor Nature Club Newsletters, Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries, accessed June 23, 2021, https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/2007_023/item/3143/show/3136.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

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Title The Spoonbill, Vol. 13, No. 5, September 1964
Alternative Title The Spoonbill, Vol. XIII, No. 5, September 1964
Contributor (Local)
  • Ellis, Pat
  • Ellis, Jim
Publisher Outdoor Nature Club
Date September 1964
Subject.Topical (LCSH)
  • Ornithology
Subject.Geographic (TGN)
  • Houston, Texas
Genre (AAT)
  • newsletters
  • periodicals
Language English
Type (DCMI)
  • Text
Original Item Location ID 2007-023, Box 9, Folder 24
ArchivesSpace URI /repositories/2/archival_objects/9849
Original Collection Outdoor Nature Club Records
Digital Collection Outdoor Nature Club Newsletters
Digital Collection URL http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/2007_023
Repository Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries
Repository URL http://libraries.uh.edu/branches/special-collections/
Use and Reproduction No Copyright - United States
File Name index.cpd
Item Description
Title Image 2
Format (IMT)
  • image/jpeg
File Name uhlib_2007_023_b009_f024_009_002.jpg
Transcript CALIFORNIA TRIP Noel Pettingell Although I covered nearly 4000 car miles in driving from Houston to Southern California and back between August 8 and 23, 1 only added 3 species to my Life List. This was due for the most part to the time of year and the fact that I generally covered areas which I had previously visited. I didn't find any Lifers in Texas but did add 3 species to my State List (which now totals 352 species), viz., Scaled Quail, Lesser Nighthawk, and Common Bushtit. Roadrunners appeared several times on the return trip — all outside the Upper Texas Coast Checklist area, wherein I have not as yet seen this unique and comical species. I found Lark Buntings (Lifer in Texas Panhandle - June, 1949) common in the Trans- Pecos region (T.OS. Area 4) between Fort Stockton and Van Horn (along US 290 & 80) on August 9th. These observations were decidedly "unsanitary" according to Peterson's "A Field Guide to the Birds of Texas" (1960), which states "Migrant through w. half, wintering (Oct.-Apr.) except in Panhandle...Breeds irregularly in Panhandle." The 5th AOU Checklist (1957) includes "northern Texas" and "southwestern New Mexico" in describing the breeding range of the Lark Bunting while Pough's "Audubon Western Bird Guide" (1957) states that it breeds "south to n.w. Texas and s.e. New Mexico.." I also found this species in other "unsanitary" areas, viz.? Aug. 22 - Flock 23 miles west of Las Cruces, southwestern N.M. (along US 80), some 100 miles SW of Cloudcroft, N.M. where it is an abundant summer resident according to a 1944 checklist of this area (McBee, et al); Aug. 9 & 22 - E. Arizona (along US 86) from 25 mi. E. of Benson to the New Mexico boundary. The above localities are probably rarely birded during the summer months due to the extreme heat, dryness, and sparse population (especially birders) prevalent in this part of the country, all of which would account for the lack of accurate information with regard to the actual extent of the Lark Bunting's summer range in the SW U.S. Arizona produced one Lifer for me. The Pyrrhuloxia ( at Tucson just before nightfall on Aug. 10). This was my 4th most-wanted species (outranked only by the rare Ivory-billed Woodpecker, Eskimo Curlew and Calif. Condor) and I have yet to find it in Texas where it is a common .permanent resident. During my first visit to Tucson in the spring of 1961 I added 9 Lifers, 4 of Which 1 found again this year (Gambei's Quail, Gilded Flicker, Gila Woodpecker, and Black-tailed Gnateateher) My two California Lifers were the Hutton's Vireo and Yellow-billed Magpie. I may have seen the vireo in the mountains NE of Tucson in early May 1961 but assumed it was a Ruby-crowned Kinglet at the time so couldn't count it as a valid Lifer since both species could have been present. On August 13 I found a Black-billed Magpie in a Santa Barbara cemetery but was assured by Waldo G. Abbott of the Santa Barbara Museum of Natural History that it was almost certainly an escaped bird as this species is commonly kept in captivity in this vicinity whereas there is not a single valid record pertaining to feral occurrence of the Black-billed Magpie in S. Calif, during the entire month of August. Since I already had the Black-billed on my L-ffe List (Dec. 1952-Colo.) I was disappointed that I hadn't found the Yellow-billed instead. However, Mr. Abbott informed me that the latter can only be found on the other side of the Santa Ynez Mountains to the north of Santa Barbara so, on August 19, the day before I would be leaving for Houston, my father along with my^two children and 1 drove over these mountains to visit Solvang, a quaint Danish village in the Santa Ynez Valley where I also expected to find the magpie. I glimpsed one once but didn't bother to:stop as I was sure I would see flocks of them further along the way. Unfortunately I didn't see a single additional magpie on the return to Santa Barbara via a different route so I was faced with the prospect of returning home with an unsanitary Yellow-billed Magpie (i.e., unseen bill color) on my L-ffe List. Rather than risk such an unsavory prospect ( a feeling only fully understood by other "hard-core" birders!), I d&iided to detour back up the mountains the next day before heading for Tucson some 600 miles from Santa Barbara. Much to my chagrin (as well as that of my wife, Ethel!) I failed once more to find this elusive species and wasialmost to San Marcos Pass enroute to Santa Barbara when Ethel spotted a magpie out in the very same pasture where I'd seen one in flight the previous day! Slamming on the brakes, I reached for the binoculars then found I didn't really need them as Yellow-billed Magpies suddenly materialized on fence posts and wires only yards from the highway! This particular