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The Spoonbill, Vol. 34, No. 9, September 1985
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The Spoonbill, Vol. 34, No. 9, September 1985 - Image 2. September 1985. Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries. University of Houston Digital Library. Web. June 23, 2021. https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/2007_023/item/3125/show/3120.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

(September 1985). The Spoonbill, Vol. 34, No. 9, September 1985 - Image 2. Outdoor Nature Club Newsletters. Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries. Retrieved from https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/2007_023/item/3125/show/3120

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

The Spoonbill, Vol. 34, No. 9, September 1985 - Image 2, September 1985, Outdoor Nature Club Newsletters, Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries, accessed June 23, 2021, https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/2007_023/item/3125/show/3120.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

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Title The Spoonbill, Vol. 34, No. 9, September 1985
Alternative Title The Spoonbill, Vol. XXXIV, No. 9, September 1985
Contributor (LCNAF)
  • Robison, B. C.
Publisher Outdoor Nature Club
Date September 1985
Subject.Topical (LCSH)
  • Ornithology
Subject.Geographic (TGN)
  • Houston, Texas
Genre (AAT)
  • newsletters
  • periodicals
Language English
Type (DCMI)
  • Text
Original Item Location ID 2007-023, Box 11, Folder 20
ArchivesSpace URI /repositories/2/archival_objects/9870
Original Collection Outdoor Nature Club Records
Digital Collection Outdoor Nature Club Newsletters
Digital Collection URL http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/2007_023
Repository Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries
Repository URL http://libraries.uh.edu/branches/special-collections/
Use and Reproduction Rights Undetermined
File Name index.cpd
Item Description
Title Image 2
Format (IMT)
  • image/jpeg
File Name uhlib_2007_023_b011_f020_008_002.jpg
Transcript Ten Years Ago This Month From September, 1975 Spoonbill; "ADIOS, PAJARITO LINDO by Margaret Dunlap When Henry and Margaret Dunlap on August 10 closed the gates of Shade Ranch at Wimberley so that Margaret might return to her assignment as English teacher at Woodrow Wilson High school in Dallas, they left behind them their Mexican visitor, the green violet- ear, who had been enthralling visitors with his songs and dances, his swoops and dives, from July 3rd right up to the moment of the Dunlap departure. Although he was still performing when Dorothy Kerbow went to the ranch on Tuesday, August 13, by the following weekend, he was gone, as were all the usual blackchins. A silence now is in the cedars. The cry of the Canyon wren still spills down the cliff as the cardinals trill and the titmice scold, but against the noise of the rushing river there is a silence, for the syncopated song of the green violetear is gone. Consulting the ABA's list of listers, the Dunlaps began to understand why scanning the violetear's guestbook had been so fascinating for many of the 367 people who had signed it since July 3. Of the 137 listers credited by ABA in December 1974 with having seen more than 50% of Texas' birds, 26 had signed the violetear's guestbook. 13 of his visitors were listed among World Listers with lists above 700, ranging through Dolly Bolton's 2457, Andrew O'Neal's 1419, Ann Follis' 1170, Graham Metson's 980, Nancy Strickling's 930, Victor Emanuel's 876, Ben Feltner's 861, Rose Ann Rowlett's 851, Paul Dumont's 850, Paul Sykes' 810, Harvey Mudd's 757 and Steve Williams' 724. 26 of the violet- ear's pilgrims were on the AOU roster of those who have seen more than 500 North American birds. Twelve of these were among the celebrated few whose U.S. Life Lists exceeded 600. Two flew east and three flew west before the green violetear flew the nest. Birders drove from 36 Texas towns: from Wimberley 67, Austin, 60, Houston 47, San Antonio 27, Dallas 22, Corpus Christi 18, Victoria 16, Beaumont 13. Bob Ake, who drove from Norfolk, Virginia, brought David Johnson, Harvey Mudd, and AOU's life-lister number two, Paul Dumont, of Washington D.C. Benton Basham flew from Chattanooga; Roland Wauer flew from Santa Fe; Graham Met son flew from Washington, D.C.; Van Guthrie of Claremont, California drove from New Mexico. Ann Follis flew to San Antonio from San Francisco, and spent the night in Wimberley. For the Dunlaps this amazing flock of housewives, retirees, professors, teachers, students, doctors, nurses, photographers, writers, technicians, scientists, and other visiting birders would make unforgettable the Summer of the Hummer." A RETURN TO BIG BEND by Wanda Smith "You're spending a week in August at Big Bend?" our friends scoffed. By the time my husband, Charlie, and I left Houston, I must admit that I too was wondering if we were crazy. However, optimism began to return as we approached the park. No matter what the conditions, Big Bend will always be one of my favorite places, and it seems that I can never tire of the beauty there. Actually, 1985 has been a particularly wet year for the park, which probably contributed to the 75 species we tallied by the end of the week. Even though the first of August is a little early for fall warblers, it wasn't too late to spot Colima Warblers — we easily located six along the path to Boot Springs. We also saw a Canada Warbler near the spring area and were informed by the birders present that this species has been recorded only three other times in the park. Down into the lower elevations. Bell's Vireos were numerous and were easily brought out. of the mesguite with an owl trill. To me, this was an amazing sight because this species was less common and extremely.shy on my last trip to the park. The Window Trail seemed to produce the most varied birding of the trip. There we got exceptional views of Varied Buntings, Black-capped Vireos and Black-chinned Sparrows, just to name a few. Later on, we headed westward to the Cottonwood campground. On previous visits to Cottonwood, I have seen a Great Horned Owl in the campground, so the first item on my agenda was to locate this bird. Charlie and I were the only people there and we quickly combed the rows of cottonwood trees finding Summer Tanagers, Vermilion Flycatchers, Blue Grosbeaks and Ladder- back Woodpeckers in abundanceL but no owl. We settled in for lunch and as I was relaxing in the shade, a wide, fluffy feather gently zigzagged down just a few feet away. I looked up and, voila! the owl was napping about 20 feet above 2 •