Keyword
in
Collection
Date
to
The Spoonbill, Vol. 35, No. 1, January 1986
Image 2
Citation
MLA
APA
Chicago/Turabian
The Spoonbill, Vol. 35, No. 1, January 1986 - Image 2. January 1986. Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries. University of Houston Digital Library. Web. October 30, 2020. https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/2007_023/item/312/show/301.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

(January 1986). The Spoonbill, Vol. 35, No. 1, January 1986 - Image 2. Outdoor Nature Club Newsletters. Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries. Retrieved from https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/2007_023/item/312/show/301

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

The Spoonbill, Vol. 35, No. 1, January 1986 - Image 2, January 1986, Outdoor Nature Club Newsletters, Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries, accessed October 30, 2020, https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/2007_023/item/312/show/301.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

URL
Embed Image
Compound Item Description
Title The Spoonbill, Vol. 35, No. 1, January 1986
Alternative Title The Spoonbill, Vol. XXXV, No. 1, January 1986
Contributor (LCNAF)
  • Robison, B. C.
Publisher Outdoor Nature Club
Date January 1986
Subject.Topical (LCSH)
  • Ornithology
Subject.Geographic (TGN)
  • Houston, Texas
Genre (AAT)
  • newsletters
  • periodicals
Language English
Type (DCMI)
  • Text
Original Item Location ID 2007-023, Box 11, Folder 22
ArchivesSpace URI /repositories/2/archival_objects/9871
Original Collection Outdoor Nature Club Records
Digital Collection Outdoor Nature Club Newsletters
Digital Collection URL http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/2007_023
Repository Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries
Repository URL http://libraries.uh.edu/branches/special-collections/
Use and Reproduction Rights Undetermined
File Name index.cpd
Item Description
Title Image 2
Format (IMT)
  • image/jpeg
File Name uhlib_2007_023_b011_f022_001_002.jpg
Transcript by Noel Pettingell Twenty Years Ago This Month From January 1966 Spoonbill: "TRAITORS SCOUR COCOA SWAMPS AND COASTS by Bill Wright Around 4:45 AM last Dec 28, I approached a busy-looking Scot, bedecked with a red jacket and matching tarn. 'Are you Allen Cruikshank?' Thus began our day of birding with the pros. Our party included two college professors in zoology and ornithology. One from the University of Tennessee and one from Adrian College, Adrian, Michigan. We were not assigned to one of the richest areas, as the 'oldtimers over the years had priority.' Even so, we managed to count 113 species in our area, and Betty and I tallied up 86. In the morning we covered a fresh-water marsh, old orange groves, deciduous forest, bayfront, and open pinewoods. The latter was a fruitless attempt at finding Red-cockaded Woodpecker and Bachman's Sparrow. In the afternoon we crossed over to the Port Canaveral area and birded some tidal flats, j_et- ties, beaches and nearby ocean and saltwater marshes. In most cases the birds seen did not differ greatly from what we may expect to see on the Houston area bird counts, except for the relative number of individuals. All crows were assumed to be fish crows unless you heard them caw with a drawn-out southern drawl. In our area the red-shouldered hawk appeared more often than the red-tailed. A tufted titmouse was an exclusive and a chickadee was unheard of. Palm warblers were everywhere. Port Canaveral produced the Florida Scrub Jay in good numbers and the Great Black-backed Gull in all plumages. Marbled Godwit and an Oystercatch- er were lifers for Betty and I. It was also good to see the Brown Pelican again. The count«-down then began with everyone in doubt about staying on top again this year. However when it was all finished and the final count given, it came to 197; however there were still a couple of parties in the field looking for owls and goatsuckers." NOTE: 197 species was'the final official 1965 total posted by the Cocoa, Fla. CBC, the No. 1 count in the U.S. for the 11th consecutive year. Although Free- port finished in 2nd place with 193 species, it had the nation's highest total from Dec. 26 to 27, 1965 and finally won top honors in 1971 with a new all-time high U.S. count of 226 species. - N.P. .-, >. .Thirty Years Ago This Month From January 1956 Spoonbill: "SPECIAL FEATURES Ringed Kingfisher at Austin Armand Yramategui Edgar Kincaid, the noted ornithologist and editor of TOS NEWSLETTER, who lives with the J. Frank Dobies in Austin, [could not believe that]...this beautiful giant kingfisher (near crow-size) with the chestnut-brown belly [had been reported]...at Barton Springs...[on Nov. 15]. Shocked is not the word that would describe Edgar when to his amazement he saw a female Ringed Kingfisher on the 'No Spear Fishing' sign. He had seen it many times in Mexico but the only three records of it in the U.S. were on the Rio Grande River many years ago. Numerous other people have since seen this rare bird at Zilker Park and have compared it with the smaller Belted Kingfisher which is often close by. Edgar invited me to Austin on December 11, 1955 to see this tropical kingfisher. After a five hour search, just as the sum was beginning to set, the kingfisher was seen on a distant wire and as she turned her head she could be recognized by the very large bill. A closer approach to the highline (across the Colorado River) disclosed her rich chestnut underparts and a few moments later a Belted Kingfisher on the same wire confirmed her size. December 11 is the last record for the bird in Austin." A MESSAGE FROM THE CHAIRMAN In December 1985, Gene Heitzman, a treasured friend of mine and many members of the OG and ONC, died unexpectedly. Gene was currently serving as OG Field Trip Chairman and ONC Program Chairman. As many of you know, over the years Gene has contributed a great deal of his time and energy to promoting education and enjoyment of nature. He conscientiously applied his talents for organizing and sharing to provide OG and ONC members with memorable experiences. His enthusiasm and broad interests in the natural environment were an inspiration to all who knew him. The loss of Gene will be felt by us for many years. 2 Stennie Meadours