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The Zephyr, Vol. 3, No. 12, December 1926
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The Zephyr, Vol. 3, No. 12, December 1926 - Image 1. December 1926. Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries. University of Houston Digital Library. Web. May 11, 2021. https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/2007_023/item/3089/show/3087.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

(December 1926). The Zephyr, Vol. 3, No. 12, December 1926 - Image 1. Outdoor Nature Club Newsletters. Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries. Retrieved from https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/2007_023/item/3089/show/3087

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

The Zephyr, Vol. 3, No. 12, December 1926 - Image 1, December 1926, Outdoor Nature Club Newsletters, Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries, accessed May 11, 2021, https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/2007_023/item/3089/show/3087.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

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Compound Item Description
Title The Zephyr, Vol. 3, No. 12, December 1926
Contributor (Local)
  • Heiser, Joseph M., Jr.
Publisher Outdoor Nature Club
Date December 1926
Subject.Topical (LCSH)
  • Ornithology
Subject.Geographic (TGN)
  • Houston, Texas
Genre (AAT)
  • newsletters
  • periodicals
Language English
Type (DCMI)
  • Text
Original Item Location ID 2007-023, Box 14, Folder 29
ArchivesSpace URI /repositories/2/archival_objects/9624
Original Collection Outdoor Nature Club Records
Digital Collection Outdoor Nature Club Newsletters
Digital Collection URL http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/2007_023
Repository Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries
Repository URL http://libraries.uh.edu/branches/special-collections/
Use and Reproduction No Copyright - United States
File Name index.cpd
Item Description
Title Image 1
Format (IMT)
  • image/jpeg
File Name uhlib_2007_023_b014_f029_012_001.jpg
Transcript THEl ZEPHYR "&r^f^ Monthly Bulletin of the Outdoor Nature Club of Houston, Texas. December, 1926 Vol.3, No. 12 _.*V Shall we have Christmas without holly? No J Where there is space, and earth, and sun, and rain, There will the crimson-berried holly grow And lend its gracious charm each year again. No torn branch, no sese and withered spray Shall mar the friendly welcome of your door If you will plant a tree this Christmas day — A living, growing gift, forevermore. One of our nationally known cartoonists has immortalized the phrase, "Somebody is always taking the joy out of life". Few of us wax enthusiastic about the "joy-killers", and in discussing the problem of preserving our Christmas greens there is no need of such a viewpoint. We are, nevertheless, confronted by a situation that has progressed far beyond the realm of theory. We are faced by. the fact that annually there is a destruction of plants, shrubs and small trees so extensive and so shortsighted in character as to rob coming generations of these joys because of our ow n prodigality. The American holly is in the most serious danger of any of our native woody plants. It is found mostly along the coast from Massachusetts to Florida and west to Texas. In its northern range it is already becoming scarce. In the winter of 1924 the small state of Delaware shipped 13,979 cases of holly by one railroad alone, each case containing two hundred wreaths. As large a quantity was shipped by water, and very much larger quantities were undoubtedly shipped from the eastern parts of the other coastal states, particularly New Jersey, Maryland, Virginia and Texas. As the red berries are borne on female trees, these have been largely cut in the past, the whole tree being often sacrificed or else losing nearly all of its branches, so that it soon dies. During the past two winters, complaints have been very general that few of the berries were found, the blame being laid on seaftonal conditions. On the contrary, this destructive cutting of female trees is largely responsible. The trees left are mainly male and non-berry bearing, and at the present rate of cutting the days of the male trees are numbered. The above paragraphs are quoted from an article on "Preserving Our Christmas Greens", in Nature Magazine, by Dr, P, L. Ricker, President of the National Wild Flower Preservation Society, and an authority on the native plants of America, Dr. Ricker states that the disappearance of our ornamental evergreens makes necessary the use of hothouse plants, imitation holly, and manufactured substitutes in holiday decorations, and that the general use of these substitutes by thinking people now may save what is left.of our beautiful wild plants, for the beautification of our scenery and the benefit of posterity* There is probably no section of the country whore the preservation of ornamental wild growth is of more vital importance than here in Houston. If we are to have attractive and interesting scenery, we must save the trees and wild flowers, for we have no hills, valleys, picturesque gorges, or waterfalls.