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The Spoonbill, Vol. 39, No. 10, October 1990
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The Spoonbill, Vol. 39, No. 10, October 1990 - Image 7. October 1990. Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries. University of Houston Digital Library. Web. June 20, 2021. https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/2007_023/item/3038/show/3036.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

(October 1990). The Spoonbill, Vol. 39, No. 10, October 1990 - Image 7. Outdoor Nature Club Newsletters. Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries. Retrieved from https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/2007_023/item/3038/show/3036

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

The Spoonbill, Vol. 39, No. 10, October 1990 - Image 7, October 1990, Outdoor Nature Club Newsletters, Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries, accessed June 20, 2021, https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/2007_023/item/3038/show/3036.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

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Title The Spoonbill, Vol. 39, No. 10, October 1990
Alternative Title The Spoonbill, Vol. XXXIX, No. 10, October 1990
Contributor (Local)
  • Mueller Boyce, Judith
Publisher Outdoor Nature Club
Date October 1990
Subject.Topical (LCSH)
  • Ornithology
Subject.Geographic (TGN)
  • Houston, Texas
Genre (AAT)
  • newsletters
  • periodicals
Language English
Type (DCMI)
  • Text
Original Item Location ID 2007-023, Box 12, Folder 7
ArchivesSpace URI /repositories/2/archival_objects/9875
Original Collection Outdoor Nature Club Records
Digital Collection Outdoor Nature Club Newsletters
Digital Collection URL http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/2007_023
Repository Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries
Repository URL http://libraries.uh.edu/branches/special-collections/
Use and Reproduction In Copyright
File Name index.cpd
Item Description
Title Image 7
Format (IMT)
  • image/jpeg
File Name uhlib_2007_023_b012_f007_009_007.jpg
Transcript circled moving northward out of range. The second sighting was when most of the underside detail and the hovering behavior was noted. The bird was very close - about 20 yards from the edge of the road north of the park and no more than 60 feet high. Rough-legged Hawk - Gary Clark, Kathy Adams Sept. 2, 1990 (edited version) Observed for 30 minutes at Challenger Park. The bird's head was whitish with light brown streaks. The base of the tail had a broad dark subterminal band and a narrow white terminal band. The breast was white with rather extensive brown streaking converging to a dark belly band. Underwing parts were white with little contrast between flight feathers and wing linings. Distinct comma marks were at the wrists. The tips of the outer primaries and the trailing edge of the wing were edged in black. The bird flew with a dihedral wing pattern. "Trail's" type flycatchers September 8, 1990 Mike Austin As is usual, the migration of empidonax flycatchers peaked during the first week of September. My Piney woods Uildlife Society field trip had excellent looks at all five regularly occurring UTC species September 8, 1990. As has been noted by other observers (Eubanks, et. al.) "Trail's" type empids seem to have a preference for scrubby type cover during migration here, particularly salt cedars, although they are occasionally encountered in woodlands (previous reports to the Clearing House). Alder: Ue had one definite Alder and two other probables on the 8th. This is only the second time I've had a protracted enough look at a freshly plumaged bird to identify it on plumage characteristics alone (although this one, fortunately, confirmed its identity by calling repetitively). Two of the birds (including the one who is described below) were in full sunlight on salt cedars at the northeastern corner of Smith Oaks Sanctuary at High Island. The third bird was working ragweed at the edge of the (dry) ditch under "The Willows" at Anahuac NWR. The other field trip participants had located the bird in my absence (I was in pursuit of another Least Flycatcher at the time). It was a very clearly-plumaged bird with clean, bright white wing bars and tertial edging. The lower belly was bright lemon yellow, the Breast showed a dark olive vest and the throat was white, sharply demarcated both from the facial color in the malar area and along the superior border of the breast band, a feature none of the Least's or Yellow- bellied which we has seen showed. Also, unlike the species above it appeared relatively long-tailed and angular-headed with moderate primary extension. Also unlike the tiny empids, although it did jerk it's tail up and down, this was not accompanied by nervous, kinglet-like wing- flicking. The head was bluish with a sharp, white eye ring wider in front of and behind the eye. The back was brownish-olive, noticeably more green than the nape and sharply demarcated from same by a paler, grayish semi- collar. Finally, the bird repeatedly emitted a sharp "bui" call, subtly sharper and shorter than the Least's call with which we were all now very familiar. All of the participants concurred this point. I have quite a bit of experience with Alder Flycatchers on breeding territory in Alaska and find this call note quite characteristic. Willow: Like Alder, these birds were all identified as "Trail's" flycatchers because of the angular heads, long tails with languid bobbing and contrasting white throats. Unlike Alder, these birds all lacked an apparent eye ring in the field (or had a gray "ghost" eye ring, at best) combined with bright white to brownish white wing bars (for heavily molting empids can all appear to lack eye rings as several Least's seen that day did) and had a uniform olive-brown head, nape and back. All of the birds were seen fairly well, two at extremely close range. One was perching on a fence next to a patch of giant cane along the dike road on the west side of Shoveler Pond at Anahuac NUR and two were in a large patch of salt cedars on the south side of Highway 87 where the western boundary of Sea Rim State Park borders the McFaddin Ranch unit of Anahuac (an area where Eubanks et.al. have encountered "Trail's" type empids in previous Septembers). Only the Sea Rim birds called, an almost imperceptible "whit", quite unlike the Alder note but very much like the Least. Uithout hearing the characteristic "fitz-biu" song or diagnostic "birrp" call note of Uillow, all these birds are only probable Uillows at best. For an excellent discussion of Uillow vs Alder Flycatchers, see "The Empidonax Challenger; Part III Trail's Flycatcher The Alder/Willow Problem" in Birding magazine, Volume XVIII, Nunber 2, PP 153-59, June 1986. Note particularly Plate 8. Wilson's Uarbler (male) - (early) Mike Austin Seen for about 20 seconds feeding on insects on the forest floor along the east perimeter fence of Smith Oaks Sanctuary at High Island. Very small, active rather plain warbler. Unmarked olive back, wings and tail. Yellow face and underparts (to vent). Sharply defined, black cap. Tiny sharp bill with pink lower mandible. Snow Goose - Bob Honig, et. al. September 3, 1990 (early) One goose at Davis Estate Road ponds. Pink bill with black "smile" mark; white face and crown; dark eye; upper part of neck white in front and dark behind; lower 2/3 of neck (front and back) and chest dark; belly mostly white with some dark extending onto flanks near rear; folded wings dark with white, very narrow streaks of white (apparently on feather edges); pink legs. Seen at approximately 300 yards walking in grassy area. Observed with binoculars and 200 m spotting scope up to 40X in bright sunlight. Seen by all party members approximately 10 minutes. Closely resembled blue phase variant in National Geographic field guide. Rufous Hummingbird - Jerry Patrick Immature Rufous Hummingbird at feeders and "hawking" insects in backyard from September 20 throught 24. Black-chinned Hummingbird - Tony and Phyllis Frank One adult male at feeder in front yard on September 20. Bird was approximately the size of a Ruby-throated Hummingbird with a green back and head. The gorget was black with purple on the lower part of the throat extending to the side. Bird was observed feeding at feeder until chased by the Ruby-throated "owner" of the feeder. Observed with 10 X 40 binoculars at a distance of approximately 15 feet. MODIFICATION TO AUGUST 1990 CLEARING HOUSE The 15 Chestnut-sided Warblers should be amended to Yellow Warblers. LOOKING FORUARD TO NOVEMBER BIRDING November should have good numbers of geese and ducks on the UTC. The wildlife refuges (Anahuac, Brazoria and San Bernard) are good locations to check for these birds. Brazoria NUR is open the first full weekend of the month and the other two refuges are generally open any time. Any flooded fields you see on your way to the refuges are also good spots to check. CONTACTS SEND CLEARING HOUSE bird sightings to: Clearing House, (OG), P.O. Box 271374, Houston 77277. UTC RARE BIRD ALERT TAPE, sponsored by Piney Uoods Uildlife Society and Houston Audubon Society, 821-2846. SEND SPOONBILL MATERIAL to Editor, Judy Boyce, 5546 Aspen, Houston 77081, 668-5359. OG MEMBERSHIP INFORMATION, dues, subscriptions and address changes. Arch Dillard, 142 Imperial Dr., Friendswood 77546, 996-0107. Annual dues $15. Non- member Spoonbill subscriptions $13.