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The Spoonbill, Vol. 16, No. 9, January 1968
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The Spoonbill, Vol. 16, No. 9, January 1968 - Image 1. January 1968. Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries. University of Houston Digital Library. Web. May 14, 2021. https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/2007_023/item/2998/show/2988.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

(January 1968). The Spoonbill, Vol. 16, No. 9, January 1968 - Image 1. Outdoor Nature Club Newsletters. Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries. Retrieved from https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/2007_023/item/2998/show/2988

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

The Spoonbill, Vol. 16, No. 9, January 1968 - Image 1, January 1968, Outdoor Nature Club Newsletters, Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries, accessed May 14, 2021, https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/2007_023/item/2998/show/2988.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

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Title The Spoonbill, Vol. 16, No. 9, January 1968
Alternative Title The Spoonbill, Vol. XVI, No. 9, January 1968
Contributor (Local)
  • Bradley, Ewell C.
  • Bradley, Julia
Publisher Outdoor Nature Club
Date January 1968
Subject.Topical (LCSH)
  • Ornithology
Subject.Geographic (TGN)
  • Houston, Texas
Genre (AAT)
  • newsletters
  • periodicals
Language English
Type (DCMI)
  • Text
Original Item Location ID 2007-023, Box 10, Folder 1
ArchivesSpace URI /repositories/2/archival_objects/9853
Original Collection Outdoor Nature Club Records
Digital Collection Outdoor Nature Club Newsletters
Digital Collection URL http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/2007_023
Repository Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries
Repository URL http://libraries.uh.edu/branches/special-collections/
Use and Reproduction No Copyright - United States
File Name index.cpd
Item Description
Title Image 1
Format (IMT)
  • image/jpeg
File Name uhlib_2007_023_b010_f001_001_001.jpg
Transcript 3 ********************** A NEW YEAR'S RESOLUTIOH VOLUME XVI, NO. 9 January, 1968 Let us resolve not only to follow our fascinating hobby, birding, the study of ornithology, etc., during the coming year, but to work individually and as a group to further conservation in all of its aspects. ******************** * # PUBLISHED BY THE ORNITHOLOGY GROUP, OUTDOOR NATURE CLUB. HOUSTOH. TEXAS It is very probable that many of our readers have read the following article. For those who have not, we feel that the author presents a strong plea for support of the preservation of our fast disappearing,precious tidelands and we consider it perhaps a very appropriate beginning of our conservation efforts.to re-print OUR VANISHING TIDELANDS by Polly Redford. Appeared originally in The Atlantic Monthly. Copyright<_)1967 by Polly Redford. (Polly Redford is a member, Miami Fla. Tropical Audubon Society.) Along the Gulf Coast and most of our seaboard from Florida to Massachusetts, a long, soft cushion of sand and mud, held together by huge mats of tough, resilient rushes and grasses, lies between solid ground and open ocean. Endless amounts of water can be hurled upon this natural barrier; each grain of sand, each blade of grass acts as a tiny baffle catching and holding the water back. And twice a day, like a sponge, it slowly soaks up the flooding tide, impounding the water until it subsides. No/word describes the whole of this low, drowned country where fresh waters merge with salt: we speak instead of bays, basins, lagoons, deltas, sandbanks, marshes, mangroves, flats. Most people, seeing only a monotony of mud and grass, sand and silence, think of them as desolate wastes, uninhabitable, therefore worthless. But they are not worthless. Without them, storm tides would pile higher and higher upon the shore, overflowing harbors, sucking away beaches and roads. Moreover, they combine with the Continental Shelf to make our south and east coasts the most productive in the world. In the swamps and marshes, along the shallow bays and creeks, biologists have discovered an annual growth of living matter equal to that of the most fertile farmlands. For tidelands trap the silt and organic matter washed down by rivers, holding them to be fertilized again and again by minerals and salts carried in from the sea. As the flowing tide spreads all these ingredients out in the sun, an extraordinary bloom of life takes place. It occurs in the surface water, where microscopic vegetables called phytoplankton grow in fantastic numbers; and on the flats and bottom, where algae and grasses draw substance from the water and energy from the sun; and in the marshes, where thick mats of decaying grasses make a compost of proteins, vitamins and carbohydrates. So much lives and grows and breeds in our tidelands that more than half of the saltwater fish and shellfish that we take are called "estuarine dependent," which means that they either spawn or hatch here, or spend some vital stage of their lives here, or feed upon the life that flows from here out over out Continental Shelf, where 90 percent of our offshore seafoods are harvested. Thus, tidelands