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The Spoonbill, Vol. 7, No. 8, December 1958
Image 11
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The Spoonbill, Vol. 7, No. 8, December 1958 - Image 11. December 1958. Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries. University of Houston Digital Library. Web. June 23, 2021. https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/2007_023/item/2970/show/2966.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

(December 1958). The Spoonbill, Vol. 7, No. 8, December 1958 - Image 11. Outdoor Nature Club Newsletters. Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries. Retrieved from https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/2007_023/item/2970/show/2966

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

The Spoonbill, Vol. 7, No. 8, December 1958 - Image 11, December 1958, Outdoor Nature Club Newsletters, Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries, accessed June 23, 2021, https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/2007_023/item/2970/show/2966.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

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Title The Spoonbill, Vol. 7, No. 8, December 1958
Alternative Title The Spoonbill, Vol. VII, No. 8, December 1958
Publisher Outdoor Nature Club
Date December 1958
Subject.Topical (LCSH)
  • Ornithology
Subject.Geographic (TGN)
  • Houston, Texas
Genre (AAT)
  • newsletters
  • periodicals
Language English
Type (DCMI)
  • Text
Original Item Location ID 2007-023, Box 9, Folder 9
ArchivesSpace URI /repositories/2/archival_objects/9843
Original Collection Outdoor Nature Club Records
Digital Collection Outdoor Nature Club Newsletters
Digital Collection URL http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/2007_023
Repository Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries
Repository URL http://libraries.uh.edu/branches/special-collections/
Use and Reproduction No Copyright - United States
File Name index.cpd
Item Description
Title Image 11
Format (IMT)
  • image/jpeg
File Name uhlib_2007_023_b009_f009_012_011.jpg
Transcript Now listed as uncommon Conspicuous among page 6 in clumps or hummocks" Sennett had difficulty in distinguishing it as he and Coues claim that our southern Sprague*s pipit has a solid appearance as compared to the northern one. BLUE YELLOW-BACKED WARBLER: You guessed it the first time - parula warbler! I'm going to quote his very charming story with your and, I hope, Uncle Sam's permission: "Just before we sighted land, imagine our surprise and joy to see a little blue yellow- backed warbler on our mast. It soon flew down to the sail, and thence to the deck, where it felt quite at home. Our sailor caught him, and he was passed around for all to admire and pet. It would nestle in our hands and enjoy the warmth without the least fear ... Often he would fly to one or the other of us, as we were lying on the deck, and into our hands and faces, with the utmost familiarity." SENNETT'S WARBLER: I believe this would correspond to the warbler Wolfe calls an olive-baeked warbler or parula pitiayumi nigrilora Coues. The Latin name given by Sennett is parula nigrilora, Coues. Wolfe feels that is is probably now a summer resident in the lower Rio Grande Valley. Santa Ana lists it as olive-backed warbler (Sennet's) and gives it as a nesting bird in the area. Sennett found it more abundant than any other warbler in a "mezquite timber of the old resaca, within a mile of town" (Hidalgo) "It was a constant surprize to me while on the Rio Grande that so few warblers were to be seen" so says Sennett. What say you? NASHVILLE WARBLER: The only specimen seen was in the dense woods in the vicinity of Hidalgo. Now in Laguna it is still occasional to uncommon, but in Santa Ana it is common. ORANGE-CROWNED WARBLER: Only one specimen taken at a lagoon near Brownsville. It was impossible to save the specimen on account of the heat. Now common at Santa Ana but seen only occasionally in the Fall at Laguna. BLACK-THROATED GREEN WARBLER: Specimen taken near Hidalgo, in both refuges except common in the Spring in Santa Ana. YELLOW HUMPED WARBLER: Right you are! The myrtle warbler it the birds seen at Padre Island and also Brownsville. Some were said to remain all summer on the southern border. Laguna gives them as abundant, but not summer residents, as does Santa Ana. Wolfe doesn't give them as a summer resident anywhere.in Texas. YELLOW THROATED WARBLER: The specimen described is subspecies albilora or Sycamore a yellow-throated warbler in which the eye stripe is entirely white. Now occasional to uncommon in both refuges. LARGE BILLED WATER THRUSH: This is our Louisiana water thrush. Seen flitting throgh the branches-near the ground and never at rest. Thought not;abundant as he didn't see others and was often in places favorable for them, Now they are listed as rare and seen only in Spring in both refuges. YELLOW BREASTED CHATs Commonly seen but more frequently heard. Sennett thinks them by far the finest singers of all our birds. Now are listed as .-common in summer but not other seasons in Laguna. Santa Ana lists them as abundant in Spring and summer but uncommon in Fall and winter. s REDSTART: Several species seen at Hidalgo in April. Now seen uncommonly in fall i and winter, but commonly in the spring at both refuges. SUMMER REDBIRDs Latin name given is Pyranga Aestiva and I can't locate any tanager called aestiva, thougn I suppose this is just our summer tanager. Seen frequently by Sennett as they are now in Santa Ana in the spring and summer. Occasional in Laguna. BARN SWALLOWs Not noticed on the Rio Grande but when the party's steamer was opposite Galveston, several flew about them, almost in their faces, and alighting on deck. WHITE-BELLIED SWALLOWs This is our tree swallow. Commonly seen by Sennett from Indianola to Point Isabel and about lagoons in Brownsville. After April 1 they were no longer seen. CLIFF SWALLOW: Hone were seen lower down the river than Hidalo much to Sennett's wonder for the conditions seemed quite as favorable for them at Brownsville or Matamoras as at points above. In the absence of cliffs in Hidalgo, the birds adapted themselves to the eaves of the buildings in town. They were especially numerous on the court-house Sennett comments on the intense gregariousness of these swallows. They are now uncommon in both refuges, but does anyone know if they still inhabit the Hidalgo court house? CEDAR BIRD: At Lejmita Ranch some seven miles above Hidalgo, Sennett was surprised to see a flock of birds. On securing a specimen, it turned out to be the familiar cherry bird of the north, our own cedar waxwing. He comments on the fact that in the north they can tolerate 12 degrees below zero and were in Hidalgo as late as May 8. RED-EYED VIREO: One species secured in Hidalgo on April 30. Uncommon now for Laguna Atascosa and not listed for Santa Ana. WHITE-EYED VIREO: Migrating pair seen in Brownsville. Listed as common for both refuges. BELL'S VIREO: Single specimen taken at Hidalgo in small bush under ebony tree. He saw nothing of its habits. It is rare and seen only in the Spring at Santa Ana now.