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The Spoonbill, Vol. 32, No. 1, January 1983
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The Spoonbill, Vol. 32, No. 1, January 1983 - Image 2. January 1983. Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries. University of Houston Digital Library. Web. May 7, 2021. https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/2007_023/item/2931/show/2924.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

(January 1983). The Spoonbill, Vol. 32, No. 1, January 1983 - Image 2. Outdoor Nature Club Newsletters. Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries. Retrieved from https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/2007_023/item/2931/show/2924

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

The Spoonbill, Vol. 32, No. 1, January 1983 - Image 2, January 1983, Outdoor Nature Club Newsletters, Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries, accessed May 7, 2021, https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/2007_023/item/2931/show/2924.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

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Compound Item Description
Title The Spoonbill, Vol. 32, No. 1, January 1983
Contributor (LCNAF)
  • Robison, B. C.
Publisher Outdoor Nature Club
Date January 1983
Subject.Topical (LCSH)
  • Ornithology
Subject.Geographic (TGN)
  • Houston, Texas
Genre (AAT)
  • newsletters
  • periodicals
Language English
Type (DCMI)
  • Text
Original Item Location ID 2007-023, Box 11, Folder 16
ArchivesSpace URI /repositories/2/archival_objects/9868
Original Collection Outdoor Nature Club Records
Digital Collection Outdoor Nature Club Newsletters
Digital Collection URL http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/2007_023
Repository Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries
Repository URL http://libraries.uh.edu/branches/special-collections/
Use and Reproduction Rights Undetermined
File Name index.cpd
Item Description
Title Image 2
Format (IMT)
  • image/jpeg
File Name uhlib_2007_023_b011_f016_001_002.jpg
Transcript BIRDS ARE WHERE YOU FIND 'EM, EVEN DOWN UNDER by T. Ben Feltner Thirty days of birding 1n Australia and Papua/New Guinea produced a wealth of highlights; to attempt a complete survey in one article 1s at best pre- sumptous. In Lamington National Park near Brisbane we six Houstonians were overwhelmed by an avifauna starring Satin and Regent Bowerbirds at arm's length, morning flocks of resplendent Crimson Rose!las descending like House Sparrows upon our heads and shoulders in search of crumbs, and activities such as searching out the Noisy Pitta in a thick rain forest. At Cairns, Al Singleton and I shared a forty-lifer day capped off by a Papuan Frogmouth at its nest, while J1m and Mary Lou Malott, Dottle Leslie and Helen Kimball explored the Great Barrier Reef. The famous Mallee scrub forest in Victoria yielded the prized Mallee Fowl. Scarlet Robins, and Emus among a hundred other species. Everywhere everyday there were new and exciting experiences to catalogue. What common denominator can be used to tell of birding adventures so rich? Sewage farms! -*«48^ ^J^fS^S^ In a la birds f numbers withsta wise. N of thei eff1uen The fun renders ravages premier was a n seems, most pr sewager employe nd loc an nd i o o r 1 t o of th . D "P ati to i ze y. es as st k to d var ng th ther elsur utfal seei e "tr arwln it" s ve of every d key a pri arved f sewage iety. e aesth group o e time 1 s as a ng a "g ue bird in the top. Ou Darwin locked of all vllege or w proc irde etic f pe comb n ac ood" er" Nor r 1 o and gat 1s shar ater as Australia, water- essing plants in tremendous rs around the world, not- s of the locale, do like- ople voluntarily spend hours ing garbage dumps and cepted and enjoyed pastime. bird J_n situ mercifully oblivious to such sensual thern Territory was our cal guide, Hilary Thompson, has a set of keys, it e in the country, but the the one to Darwin's ed only with the plant's long-distanced view of a Reef Heron, a bush full of Red-winged Parrots, and our first view of the Australian Hobby, a bold little falcon with the elan of our Merlin. At Hilary's urging we left the coastal area and headed for the cooling ponds. Along the way we paused only at the sight of three spectacular Red-tailed Cockatoos, huge black parrots with macaw-like bearing, as they flapped slowly into the sun. Upon our arrival at the gates we found our first Marsh Sandpiper in a muddy ditch; it looks like a cross between a Lesser Yel 1 owl egs and a Sol i tar.y Sandpiper. The chainlink fence was opened and we drove a small ramp to a birder's paradise. The hundred or so acres of open water before us was teeming with birds. A low cement wall on our left held a dozen Pied Herons, Louisiana Heron-sized birds neatly decked in black and white. This turned out to be the only place we saw this bird on the entire trip. As the vast array of birds became evident our excitement increased accordingly. Two Blac pond Magp Its rath and we a cern were aust . and Duck high cl OS specie k, mil s hund ie Gee bTack er sma unwebb pproac ible s commo ere as a n o t h p . The numbe e rel a s of I ed o reds se, a and w II he ed fe hed i p e c i e n. Th Quae hir Burde r of tive terns, ver th of res bird h i te p ad and et are n our s. Whi ere we kers, H rnmp kin is bl ack in the Whiskered e wate ting d so unu lumage pinki the s vehicl stiing re hun a few 1 p t. p 1 y one o and wh U.S. rTOn ucks sual is s sh or ame c e, th and dreds Austr and W_h the d shared it has urmoun ange b olor o e duck PIumed ite-winged ikes between space with its own genus, ted by a eak. The f orange, s became legs As dis- Tree-Ducks of Grey Teal al 1an new f Aus ite b tn us, traiia irds. Black Ducks, the Burdekin 's unusually It has no Since our arriving flight brought us to Darwin late in the evening, an hour or two of daylight was all that remained. A hasty side trip to the coast netted us a