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The Zephyr, Vol. 2, No. 4, April 1925
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The Zephyr, Vol. 2, No. 4, April 1925 - Image 1. April 1925. Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries. University of Houston Digital Library. Web. December 9, 2021. https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/2007_023/item/2904/show/2900.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

(April 1925). The Zephyr, Vol. 2, No. 4, April 1925 - Image 1. Outdoor Nature Club Newsletters. Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries. Retrieved from https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/2007_023/item/2904/show/2900

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

The Zephyr, Vol. 2, No. 4, April 1925 - Image 1, April 1925, Outdoor Nature Club Newsletters, Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries, accessed December 9, 2021, https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/2007_023/item/2904/show/2900.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

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Compound Item Description
Title The Zephyr, Vol. 2, No. 4, April 1925
Contributor (Local)
  • Heiser, Joseph M., Jr.
Publisher Outdoor Nature Club
Date April 1925
Subject.Topical (LCSH)
  • Ornithology
Subject.Geographic (TGN)
  • Houston, Texas
Genre (AAT)
  • newsletters
  • periodicals
Language English
Type (DCMI)
  • Text
Original Item Location ID 2007-023, Box 14, Folder 28
ArchivesSpace URI /repositories/2/archival_objects/9623
Original Collection Outdoor Nature Club Records
Digital Collection Outdoor Nature Club Newsletters
Digital Collection URL http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/2007_023
Repository Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries
Repository URL http://libraries.uh.edu/branches/special-collections/
Use and Reproduction No Copyright - United States
File Name index.cpd
Item Description
Title Image 1
Format (IMT)
  • image/jpeg
File Name uhlib_2007_023_b014_f028_004_001.jpg
Transcript • *» THE ZEPHYR jfonthly Bulletin of the Outdoor Nature Club of Houston, Texas. Vol. 2/ No. 4 April, 1925 Think/ every morning when the sun peeps through The dim/ leaf-latticed windows of the grove, How jubilant the happy birds renew Their old melodious madrigals of lovel And when you think of this, remember too 'Tis always morning somewhere/ and above The awakening continents/ from shore to shore Somewhere the birds are singing evermore.. — Longfellow. In his proclamation calling upon all citizens of the United States to observe American Forest Week from April 27 to May 3/ President Coolidge says: "We have too freely stent the rich and magnificent gift that Nature has bestowed on us. In our eagerness to use that gift, we have stripped our forests; we have permitted fires to lay waste and devour them; we have all too often destroyed the young growth and the seeds from which new forests might spring. And though we already feel the £i_rst grip of the timber shortage, we have barely begun to save and restore. Our children are dependent on our course. We are bound by a solemn obligation from which no evasion and no subterfuge will relieve us. Unless we fulfill our sacred responsibility to unborn generations, unless we use with gratitude and restraint the generous and kindly gifts of Divine Providence, we shall prove ourselves unworthy guardians of a heritage we hold in t rust. " In accordance with a resolution'adopted by the Thirty- Eighth Legislature of the State of Texas/ May 1 has been designated as "Texas Bird and Wild Flower Day". In 1924, Governor Neff issued a proclamation in regard to the celebration of the day. He said: "Remembering the fact that our native birds and wild flowers decrease as our population increases and as man selects for his home their former haunts, it is fitting- that our attention he called to the necessity and propriety of preserving these beautiful manifestations of Nature's handiwork. I hope that the parent s and teachers throughotct ^t_.-'..tr&ate will give generously of their time and energy in fostering in the minds of the children of Texas a spirit of appreciation of the wild flowers with which Providence has so bountifully clothed at this season of the year, the sunlit hills and broad prairies of Texas." ; The summer came and all the birds were dead; The days were like hot coals; the very ground Was burned, to ashes; in'the orchards fed Myriads of caterpillars/ and around The eu.ltivated fields and garden beds Hosts of devouring insects crawled/ and found No foe to check their march/ till they had made The land a desert without leaf or shade. — Longfellow, Birds of Killingworth.