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The Spoonbill, Vol. 18, No. 2, June 1969
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The Spoonbill, Vol. 18, No. 2, June 1969 - Image 1. June 1969. Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries. University of Houston Digital Library. Web. June 20, 2021. https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/2007_023/item/2863/show/2855.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

(June 1969). The Spoonbill, Vol. 18, No. 2, June 1969 - Image 1. Outdoor Nature Club Newsletters. Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries. Retrieved from https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/2007_023/item/2863/show/2855

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

The Spoonbill, Vol. 18, No. 2, June 1969 - Image 1, June 1969, Outdoor Nature Club Newsletters, Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries, accessed June 20, 2021, https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/2007_023/item/2863/show/2855.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

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Compound Item Description
Title The Spoonbill, Vol. 18, No. 2, June 1969
Alternative Title The Spoonbill, Vol. XVIII, No. 2, June 1969
Contributor (Local)
  • Lefkovits, David
  • Lefkovits, Dorothy
Publisher Outdoor Nature Club
Date June 1969
Subject.Topical (LCSH)
  • Ornithology
Subject.Geographic (TGN)
  • Houston, Texas
Genre (AAT)
  • newsletters
  • periodicals
Language English
Type (DCMI)
  • Text
Original Item Location ID 2007-023, Box 10, Folder 4
ArchivesSpace URI /repositories/2/archival_objects/9854
Original Collection Outdoor Nature Club Records
Digital Collection Outdoor Nature Club Newsletters
Digital Collection URL http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/2007_023
Repository Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries
Repository URL http://libraries.uh.edu/branches/special-collections/
Use and Reproduction No Copyright - United States
File Name index.cpd
Item Description
Title Image 1
Format (IMT)
  • image/jpeg
File Name uhlib_2007_023_b010_f004_006_001.jpg
Transcript 5 VOLUME XVIII, NO. 2 June, 1969 -c_a -b-si If a man could really get a "bird's eye view" of the world around him, he would be amazing - and amazed! A bird's eyes are so keen that they can see a grain of seed from a distance of 100 yards, whereas man can barely see the seed from a distance of five feet or less, from The Houston Chronicle, Hay 9, 1969 PUBLISHED BY THE 0RHITH0L0GY GROUP. OUTDOOR HATURE CLUB.HOUSTOH.TEXAS BROWN PELICAHS MAKE COMEBACK The brown pelican, rare in recent years along the Texas Coast, is presently showing signs of making a comeback. Coastal Fisheries biologist of the Texas Parks and Wildlife Department report sightings of about 50 of these salty fishing birds this spring, about twice the number seen last year. What is more encouraging is that the birds are scattered in groups along the coast. Biologists sighted 16 in the Lower Laguna Hadre, 24 in Corpus Christi Bay, nine near Pass Cavallo and one in Galveston Bay. The disappearance of this handsome and friendly bird in recent years caused considerable concern among naturalists because they are not certain of tho reason for the sudden decline along the Gulf Coast west of Florida. The increasing presence of pesticides in the marine environment is one of the suspected causes since the birds feed almost entirely on fish and would likely accumulate large, poisonous doses over extended periods. One of the effects of pesticides inhibits reproduction in some birds and causes the species to die out without replacement. In past years brown pelicans could be found in abundant numbers along the coast perched on waterfront pilings, begging a handout from fishermen or plunging bill first from the air into the water after a fish. These large brown birds have considerable white on their heads and necks and a wing span of over six feet. It is the state bird of Louisiana and is protected by Texas law. The above article was published in the June 2 bulletin of the Texas Parks and Wildlife Department. HOTES ON PLUMAGE OF MALE MASKED DUCKS - by CHARLOTTE JOHNSON January 10, 1969 at Freeport, Texas on highway to West Jetty I saw a male Masked Duck in "splotchy coloration". Within several days of this date Tommy Schulenberg saw a male Masked Duck in a similar "splotchy coloration", at a pond on Carribbean St. in Corpus Christi where the Masked Ducks had spent some months prior to this time. Neither of us knew of the other's sighting. I told Doris McGuire of Rockport of mine, and she then told me of Tommy's and added that no one else had seen this in Corpus Christi. The only Masked Ducks seen after this time on the Corpus pond appeared to be in female plumage. It is possible that these two drakes were going into "eclipse plumage". All following sightings, except one were at same pond at Rockport, Texas, Hay 24, 1969 at Rockport, Texas two Masked Ducks napping on brash in pond. One was apparently coming into male colorful plumage from a plumage similar to the female's.