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The Spoonbill, Vol. 43, No. 6 - 7, June - July 1994
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The Spoonbill, Vol. 43, No. 6 - 7, June - July 1994 - Image 4. June 1994 - July 1994. Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries. University of Houston Digital Library. Web. October 18, 2021. https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/2007_023/item/286/show/279.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

(June 1994 - July 1994). The Spoonbill, Vol. 43, No. 6 - 7, June - July 1994 - Image 4. Outdoor Nature Club Newsletters. Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries. Retrieved from https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/2007_023/item/286/show/279

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

The Spoonbill, Vol. 43, No. 6 - 7, June - July 1994 - Image 4, June 1994 - July 1994, Outdoor Nature Club Newsletters, Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries, accessed October 18, 2021, https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/2007_023/item/286/show/279.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

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Title The Spoonbill, Vol. 43, No. 6 - 7, June - July 1994
Contributor (Local)
  • Mueller Boyce, Judith
Publisher Outdoor Nature Club
Date June 1994 - July 1994
Subject.Topical (LCSH)
  • Ornithology
Subject.Geographic (TGN)
  • Houston, Texas
Genre (AAT)
  • newsletters
  • periodicals
Language English
Type (DCMI)
  • Text
Original Item Location ID 2007-023, Box 12, Folder 15
ArchivesSpace URI /repositories/2/archival_objects/9879
Original Collection Outdoor Nature Club Records
Digital Collection Outdoor Nature Club Newsletters
Digital Collection URL http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/2007_023
Repository Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries
Repository URL http://libraries.uh.edu/branches/special-collections/
Use and Reproduction In Copyright
File Name index.cpd
Item Description
Title Image 4
Format (IMT)
  • image/jpeg
File Name uhlib_2007_023_b012_f015_006_004.jpg
Transcript I ^.JVESTING SWALLOW-TAILED KITES DOCUMENTED IN EAST TEXAS. Almost a year after completing a three-year survey for American Swallow- tailed Kites, Dan Boone, a Texas Parks and Wildlife Department biologist in Jasper, has verified the first active nest in Texas since 1911-14. ...The birds have been seen occasionally in East Texas, but there has not been an active nest documented for about 80 years. ...The nesting pair was found on Temple Inland Forest Products Corp. property in Tyler County. Boone said he has suspected isolated nesting activity in East Texas during the past four years, but this was the first time an active nest has been found. ...Temple Inland is taking precautionary measures to ensure the success of the nesting pair. Consequently, public viewing will not be allowed. Texas Parks and Wildlife News, May 20,1994. .......WANT TO HELP SAVE AN ENDANGERED SPECIES? GET RID OF THAT BIRD FEEDER! In scenic Austin, where real estate development has been stymied by fights over preserving endangered species, it turns out the main enemy of the Golden-cheeked Warbler is not the bulldozer. It's the Blue Jay. "It's tough to tell people that the best thing they can do to help endangered songbirds is to get rid of those bird feeders, but everything points to that conclusion," said Tom Engels, who conducted a study to determine why warbler populations are declining. Austin's unique ecosystem of limestone hills, cedar trees, caves and aquifers makes it home to more endangered birds and bugs than any urban area in the United States. Songbirds such as the warbler and the Black-capped Vireo, plus several rare cave spiders, have stalled everything from construction of shopping malls to cedar chopping on private land. City of Austin biologist, Chuck Sexton, said "Once subdivisions are slapped up, the humans who live in them are impacting the warblers even further. That's because we're raising Blue Jays. And they are marauding beyond the boundaries of the houses." Blue Jays grow fat on food in bird feeders, cat and dog food left outside, and insects in lawns and garbage. The ecosystem remains in balance as long as natural trees and shrubs stay in place. When jays get access to birdseed, pet food and Bermuda grass, their populations explode— and warblers hit the skids. "The message we hope folks get out of this is to minimize the impacts of their lifestyle on native areas," Sexton said Sexton said newcomers who want to help warblers can leave native plants and bushes in place instead of planting lawns-and stop feeding birds. Hummingbird feeders are fine, but because jays cant get to sugared water. But open feeders encourage jays and lead to the decline of warblers. The Houston Post, MaryLenz, May, 1994. --^.OSPREYS FLEDGE YOUNG AGAIN AT LAKE HOUSTON. Ospreys have nested for at least the last two years on top of a Houston Lighting and Power transmission pole in Lake Houston. Richard Britton first reported the nest during April, hatching in mid-May and fledging of two young in Jury. This same nest site was occupied by a pair of Osprey last year and they were reported to fledge two young then as well. Nesting Osprey are rare in Texas. Recent nesting activities have been only reported at two sites on Sam Rayburn Reservoir. During the previous decade, Osprey were reported to nest on Lake Fork Reservoir and the lower Laguna Madre. Brent Ortego, Texas Parks and Wildlife Department NOW* N1CM 20 YEARS AGO/ FROM JUNE 1974 SPOONBILL by Nod Pettingell Clearing House Notes Bachman's Sparrow: On Jury 22, 1972, Paul and Phyllis Nimmons found two Bachman's Sparrow near Russ Clapper's house in Chambers County. Just east of the intersection of FM 562 and FM 1985 there is a road that veers off of FM 1985. The sparrows were found about eight tenths of a mile down this road Investigating their report, Ben Feltner and I found a Bachman's Sparrow singing there at 8:45 am. on May 2, 1974. It was singing from the tip of a pine branch. The song is a slow trill with a lower introductory whistle, and varies with trills and whistles on different pitches. Visually, the bird is nondescript, long tailed and clear breasted. Bachman's Sparrow were formerly recorded around Lake Houston, but in recent years none have been reported This sighting seems to represent a rediscovery of the bird in the UTC area DanHardy