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The Spoonbill, Vol. 43, No. 6 - 7, June - July 1994
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The Spoonbill, Vol. 43, No. 6 - 7, June - July 1994 - Image 2. June 1994 - July 1994. Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries. University of Houston Digital Library. Web. October 18, 2021. https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/2007_023/item/286/show/277.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

(June 1994 - July 1994). The Spoonbill, Vol. 43, No. 6 - 7, June - July 1994 - Image 2. Outdoor Nature Club Newsletters. Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries. Retrieved from https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/2007_023/item/286/show/277

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

The Spoonbill, Vol. 43, No. 6 - 7, June - July 1994 - Image 2, June 1994 - July 1994, Outdoor Nature Club Newsletters, Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries, accessed October 18, 2021, https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/2007_023/item/286/show/277.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

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Title The Spoonbill, Vol. 43, No. 6 - 7, June - July 1994
Contributor (Local)
  • Mueller Boyce, Judith
Publisher Outdoor Nature Club
Date June 1994 - July 1994
Subject.Topical (LCSH)
  • Ornithology
Subject.Geographic (TGN)
  • Houston, Texas
Genre (AAT)
  • newsletters
  • periodicals
Language English
Type (DCMI)
  • Text
Original Item Location ID 2007-023, Box 12, Folder 15
ArchivesSpace URI /repositories/2/archival_objects/9879
Original Collection Outdoor Nature Club Records
Digital Collection Outdoor Nature Club Newsletters
Digital Collection URL http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/2007_023
Repository Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries
Repository URL http://libraries.uh.edu/branches/special-collections/
Use and Reproduction In Copyright
File Name index.cpd
Item Description
Title Image 2
Format (IMT)
  • image/jpeg
File Name uhlib_2007_023_b012_f015_006_002.jpg
Transcript Chairman's Message Dave Bradford The Gulf of Mexico is the last real birding frontier in the U.S.A. Nome, Attn, the Rockies, the Appalachian, Dry Tortugas and even Point Barrow are areas covered by professional bird companies. These companies will even take you into waters off the Pacific and Atlantic coasts, but try to take a deep-water pelagic trip off the Texas coast through a tour company, or by any other means. It ain't easy and is often expensive. For many years west coast birders have been plying the nearshore Pacific off the California, Oregon and Washington coasts for pelagic birds. More recently, birders on the east coast have been exploring the deep waters of the nearshore Atlantic coast for pelagic birds. Only in the past few years have there been pelagic trips designed exclusively for birders wanting to venture into the Gulf of Mexico. We no longer have to tag along as riders on a fishing trip, traveling to where the fish are, but no necessarily the birds. There is no sufficient interest from birders and boat captains allowing pelagic trips just for birders to the deep water off the Texas coast. , coast for small, fast vessels that would get birders out to the deep water. This proved an expensive, time- consuming and arduous task. Boat captains did not believe there would be enough people interested in In the 70's and 80's, most birding off the Texas coast was done from fishing boats seeking schools of snapper at distances no more than 40 to 50 miles offshore. Though some of these trips led to some interesting birds, there were other trips that lead to nothing but a vast, bird-less ocean. In 1989 the Dallas Audubon Society sponsored two pelagic trips on the Scat-Cat exclusively for birders and went about 60 miles offshore on each trip. In 1990,1991 and 1992, the OG sponsored three trips exclusively for birders and attained distances of about 60 miles offshore. Because of these trips and others taken on fishing vessels, a better understanding of pelagic birds off the Texas coast has developed However some people realized two problems with 12-hour Scat-Cat trips: 1) most of the trip time was spent traveling to and from the "deep water" allowing only a short time to search for "deep water" pelagic birds; and 2) because of the width of the continental shelf off the Texas coast, we never really reached deep waters. OG member, Ronnie Carroll, realized the problems with Scat-Cat trips and began scouring the looking at birds and refused to charter their boats to birders. Many boat captains would not even consider bringing birders onto a fishing vessel. With perseverance and money, Ronnie and others made it to the deep water areas finding storm-petrels, Bridled and Sooty Terns in large numbers—even a Brown Noddy. OG members, Dwight Peake and Mark Elwonger, have continued with the deepwater pelagic effort this year by chartering a boat out of Port O'Connor for four 17-hour trips at a very reasonable rate ($85- 90.00 per person). The May trip had about 30 participants and found great birds. The "bird of the trip" was a Greater Shearwater we found above a school of feeding tuna This shearwater, if accepted by the TBRC, will be only the sixth accepted record for Texas. Leach's and Band-rumped Storm-petrel, Bridled Tern and Audubon's Shearwater rounded out the other pelagics sported on the trip. Whales and whale sharks have been seen on some of these deep-water trips. We had close up looks at two 18-foot whale sharks in May. With continued efforts and explorations we may eventually begin to conquer and understand the last real birding frontier left in the U.S. If you want to be a part of the conquest, call Dwight Peake at (409)740-4621. There is still space available on the August 20th and September 24th trips. Remember, as with most birding trips, there is no guarantee the birds will be where we want them to be, but there are plenty of interesting birds waiting to be found.