Keyword
in
Collection
Date
to
The Spoonbill, Vol. 48, No. 2, February 1999
Image 3
Citation
MLA
APA
Chicago/Turabian
The Spoonbill, Vol. 48, No. 2, February 1999 - Image 3. February 1999. Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries. University of Houston Digital Library. Web. November 27, 2021. https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/2007_023/item/2813/show/2809.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

(February 1999). The Spoonbill, Vol. 48, No. 2, February 1999 - Image 3. Outdoor Nature Club Newsletters. Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries. Retrieved from https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/2007_023/item/2813/show/2809

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

The Spoonbill, Vol. 48, No. 2, February 1999 - Image 3, February 1999, Outdoor Nature Club Newsletters, Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries, accessed November 27, 2021, https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/2007_023/item/2813/show/2809.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

URL
Embed Image
Compound Item Description
Title The Spoonbill, Vol. 48, No. 2, February 1999
Contributor (LCNAF)
  • Carey, Damien F.
Publisher Outdoor Nature Club
Date February 1999
Subject.Topical (LCSH)
  • Ornithology
Subject.Geographic (TGN)
  • Houston, Texas
Genre (AAT)
  • newsletters
  • periodicals
Language English
Type (DCMI)
  • Text
Original Item Location ID 2007-023, Box 13, Folder 1
ArchivesSpace URI /repositories/2/archival_objects/9884
Original Collection Outdoor Nature Club Records
Digital Collection Outdoor Nature Club Newsletters
Digital Collection URL http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/2007_023
Repository Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries
Repository URL http://libraries.uh.edu/branches/special-collections/
Use and Reproduction In Copyright
File Name index.cpd
Item Description
Title Image 3
Format (IMT)
  • image/jpeg
File Name uhlib_2007_023_b013_f001_002_003.jpg
Transcript News, Notes & Announcements erratic walking and swimming movements, caused by a neurotoxin that creates lesions in the brain and spinal cord. DU has joined the CEBLS research effort, which also involves the Army Corps of Engineers, USFWS, U.S. Geological Survey, Arkansas Department of Parks and Tourism, and numerous other supporters. Studies related to CEBLS have included banding and tracking of eagles and coots, and extensive laboratory analysis of afflicted birds. The origin of the disease remains unknown, and supporters are presently being sought to fund additional research. Waterfowlers and other outdoor recreationists who see eagles or coots acting in a strange or erratic manner are encouraged to report these sightings to researchers listed on the CEBLS WWW site at www.mvk.usace.army.mil/ol/odm/cebls.htm. They also are encouraged to report sightings of marked birds involved in the study. Bald eagles are marked with standard aluminum leg bands, green alphanumeric leg bands, and tail-mounted radio transmitters. Coots are marked with standard aluminum leg bands and colored neck collars. Say It Ain't So Cats are now the #1 pet in America. Fascinating behavior and physical beauty endear them to their owners. But within every cat are the genes of an efficient, prolific, and non- native predator, according to American Bird Conservancy (ABC). Scientists estimate that free-roaming cats kill hundreds of millions of birds, and probably more than a billion other small wildlife, in the U. S. each year. Not only are common birds such as Northern Cardinal, Song Sparrow, and Mourning Dove killed by cats, but cats also prey on rare and endangered species such as Piping Plover, California Clapper Rail, California Least Tern, and Western Snowy Plover, and species in decline such as Black-throated Blue Warbler and Wood Thrush. Particularly at risk are ground nesting and ground feeding birds, as well as nestlings and fledgling birds of many species. Cats also kill small mammals which are vital food sources for birds such as Great Horned Owl, Red-Tailed Hawk, and American Kestrel. Wildlife populations isolated in islandlike habitats, such as parks and refuges surrounded by developed areas, are especially vulnerable to cat predation. The sheer magnitude of cat predation is staggering. More than 40 million ofthe nation's 66 million pet cats are outdoors unsupervised _*•'?-' _________=si,> C-ISIKIXKXKS! ■_il_C_itt*KiSiK!_S»Si_lB__!S&C_S some or all of the time. Combined with the estimated 40 to 60 million stray and feral cats, perhaps 100 million cats are aggravating the impacts of diminishing habitat for America's native wildlife. Recognizing that cat predation is both a local concern and a national issue, ABC created Cats Indoors! The Campaign for Safer Birds and Cats to develop partnerships with conservation, animal welfare, veterinary, wildlife rehabilitation, and public health groups, as well as the pet products industry. Find out more by contacting ABO For more information, contact American Bird Conservancy Cats Indoors! The Campaign for Safer Birds and Cats 1250 24th Street NW, Suite 400 Washington, DC 20037 phone: (202) 778-9666, fax: (202) 778-9778, email: abc@abcbirds.org . Snow Goose Season II Federal officials have approved a special conservation action to address the snow goose overpopulation crisis, Texas Parks and Wildlife (TPW) announced. Effective February 16, hunters may use electronic goose calls and other approved liberal means for taking light geese statewide until April 25. However, the special season, which was originally slated to begin February l,may face legal challenges and could be terminated before April 25. "The regular light goose hunting seasons in Texas closed February 14 and some geese have already been seen heading back north," according to Brian Sullivan, TPW waterfowl program coordinator. "We still have birds to hunt. Normally, we have geese through late February and early March, depending on the weather." There is no bag limit during the special conservation season. Additionally, other approved measures will allow hunters to use electronic goose calls and unplugged shotguns . The regulations also extend shooting hours from one-half hour before sunrise to one-half hour after sunset and eliminate the bag and possession limits for light geese. In order to participate in the special light goose season, hunters still have to meet all other requirements for taking waterfowl in Texas, including purchase of state and federal duck stamps and acquiring HIP (Harvest Information Program) certification. In an effort to provide additional public hunting opportunity, on each day of the special conservation season, TPW will offer all- day public hunting by Annual Public Hunting Permit on the following wildlife management areas: J.D. Murphree WMA, Guadalupe River and Hynes Bay Units of Guadalupe Delta WMA, and Bryan Beach Unit of Peach Point WMA. There will be no requirement for participating hunters to check in or check out at the WMA checkstation or perform on-site registration during these hunts. Also, one day, morning-only light goose hunts will be available by Regular Permit at Mad Island WMA on February 20 and at Peach Point WMA on February 27. Hunters will be required to check in and out at the WMA checkstation. With the elimination of the bag and possession limits during the -special season, TPW, along with waterfowl processors and the Texas Association of Community Action Agencies , is encouraging hunters to share their harvestwith needy Texans through apilotproject within the Hunters for the Hungry program. Hunters may take legally harvested light geese (snow, blue and Ross' geese) to any of the participating waterfowl processors and pay a tax-deductible processing fee of $1 to $3 per bird. Processors then prepare the bird and donate the meat to food banks, food pantries and other food assistance providers in their area. Good News From The Valley The McAllen newspaper, "The Monitor," reported in January that the Lower Rio Grande Valley National Wildlife Refuge (LRGV NWR) submitted a new public use plan to USF&WS headquarters in Albuquerque, NM and Washington, D.C. The plan, written by Brian Winton, assistant manager of the Santa Ana NWR, proposes opening up 7 LRGV tracts of approximately 40,000 acres to wildlife compatible activities. This plan is expected to be approved as early as 6 to 8 months. Most tracts have water associated with them. One is along the Rio Grande near Salineno; 2areintheSalDel Rey area; 1 is near a reservoir in central Hidalgo Co.; and the biggest is the 17,000 acre Boca Chica Tract in southeastern Cameron Co. Also in the works for the LRGV NWR is the possibility that Congress may provide the refuge system with $7.4 million forland acquisition. The amount is the third highest amount the LRGV has received. Annual allotments have been averaging about $900,000.