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The Spoonbill, Vol. 48, No. 2, February 1999
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The Spoonbill, Vol. 48, No. 2, February 1999 - Image 2. February 1999. Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries. University of Houston Digital Library. Web. November 27, 2021. https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/2007_023/item/2813/show/2808.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

(February 1999). The Spoonbill, Vol. 48, No. 2, February 1999 - Image 2. Outdoor Nature Club Newsletters. Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries. Retrieved from https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/2007_023/item/2813/show/2808

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

The Spoonbill, Vol. 48, No. 2, February 1999 - Image 2, February 1999, Outdoor Nature Club Newsletters, Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries, accessed November 27, 2021, https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/2007_023/item/2813/show/2808.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

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Title The Spoonbill, Vol. 48, No. 2, February 1999
Contributor (LCNAF)
  • Carey, Damien F.
Publisher Outdoor Nature Club
Date February 1999
Subject.Topical (LCSH)
  • Ornithology
Subject.Geographic (TGN)
  • Houston, Texas
Genre (AAT)
  • newsletters
  • periodicals
Language English
Type (DCMI)
  • Text
Original Item Location ID 2007-023, Box 13, Folder 1
ArchivesSpace URI /repositories/2/archival_objects/9884
Original Collection Outdoor Nature Club Records
Digital Collection Outdoor Nature Club Newsletters
Digital Collection URL http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/2007_023
Repository Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries
Repository URL http://libraries.uh.edu/branches/special-collections/
Use and Reproduction In Copyright
File Name index.cpd
Item Description
Title Image 2
Format (IMT)
  • image/jpeg
File Name uhlib_2007_023_b013_f001_002_002.jpg
Transcript Ornithology Group H|| Chairman Vjce-Ch airman David Sarko_i (713) 520-5906 Treasurer LmCbert |||||||;778.17Q8. Spcretflty OPEN Program Coordinator David Bradford Learning Cor^ef C^fflfeitrajfir KipbOhrnaft ||||f|i) 579-7403 field Trip Coordmatjjjfif;' David $_rkozi (713) 520-5906 M^dr^ek Fiel^.^r^.^^rdina^jlli Sooay Fisher (281) 346-2354 Ctearmg House __DTK>RWAi<rr__D (713)520-5906 VforldWideWebSite http:// texsrebirding st mpUsnet-com/bog/ ilWjjsfilSlasiei; ||||§|||§avid Sarkozi dsarkozi(^__sh.net WMe Spoonbill Published by Ornithology Orutip Outdoor Natune dub P.O. Box 270894 Houston, TX 7727?-&85r4 !____& Dan-en Carey Pk»e & Fax $81) 361-4120 email: de@lringwoodcabfc.com Contributions io "The Spoonbill*' can be mailed, fased Qi|ipMedv".". The monthly deadline for timely fn- Ibtas-ti-a is t&* 15th tftnery twmtL The editor reserves tbe right to edit or tefosc submissions. ii|l swbmisssons should include tontact infamatioWJifrt the author and/or person, doing the submitting.* lit!!!! Please include as much ir_»_au_Jon as pos'ilili" ihout the source when submitting copyrighted material C_ftt_ci fee edt tor for assistailliiwlll News, Notes & Announcements Easy Money Partners in Flight, headed by Cliff Shackelford of Texas Parks and Wildlife, is conducting a 1999 Swallow-tailed Kite survey through the sponsorship of Temple-Inland Forest Surveys have been sent to the OG and are also available at most popular birding spots along the coast of Texas. A J500 reward is offered for finding a new, undisturbed, active STKI nest Details are in the survey. We would Hike to know about all STKIs seen, not just nest sites. At the end ofthe season a booklet showing all the sightings and statistics will be sent to all contributors. For information contact either of the following Gael Simons, lsimons@inetportcom and (512) 892-2518 or Cliff Shackelford, Clifford.shackelford@tpwd.state.tx.us and (512) 389-4970. Try This At Home Researchers say ducks are capable of what teachers and bosses have suspected of the rest of us — sleeping with one eye open. After putting their ducks in a row, and videotaping them, researchers found mallards on the end of each, row spent more time asleep with one eye open, apparently looking for predators. The more the ducks felt threatened, the more they slept with one eye open, said lead author Niels C. Rattenborg, a graduate student at Indiana State University, Terre Haute. "The unique aspect is not that they do it, but that they control it" Rattenborg said. "When they sleep at the edge of a group they tend to perceive greater risk, so they spend more time sleepingwith one half of their brain." Ducks with one eye open were still awake enough to detect predators, said the authors ofthe study, which appears in the journal Nature. Researchers studied four groups of four ducks held in plastic boxes, which were arranged in a row. Ducks on the end were found to sleep with one eye open 31.8 percent ofthe rime, compared to 12.4 percent ofthe time for ducks in the central position. Also, ducks in the center did not open one eye more than the other, while ducks on each end kept the eye facing away from the group open 86.2 percent of die time. Brain wave readings of the ducks showed that the half of the brain receiving signals from the closedeye indicated that half of the brain was sleeping. Signals from the half of the brain receiving signals from the open eye showed a state between fully awake and asleep. Rattenborg said other animals, such as dolphins and other aquatic mammals show the ability to sleep with half their brains. Other experts argue that those animals aren't really sleeping at times when their eye is open. Dr. David F. Dinges, director of sleep and chronobiology studies at the University of Pennsylvania School of Medicine, said the findings are important, but should be duplicated. "If you said to many people, how would you like to sleep one hemisphere at a time wrule the other half of the brain works, most would jump at it," Dinges said. "But we don't know the quality ofthe duck's consciousness. We don't know what the restorative potential of that sleep is." AP Newswire February 3, 1999 Copyright AP On-Une, 1999 Not So Good News in the Duck's This article first Unlimited magazine. The U.S. Army Corps of Engineers is asking waterfowlers and other outdoor enthusiasts to track the spread of a new disease afflicting bald eagles and coots. Coot and Eagle Brain Lesion Syndrome (CEBLS), which has killed at least 58 bald eagles to date, was first discovered in 1994 at DeGray Lake near Arkadelphia, Arkansas. The disease quickly spread to eagles on Lake Ouiachita and Hamilton near Hot Springs, Arkansas, and was discovered in coots at private lakes in Georgia and North Carolina last winter. Afflicted birds display impaired motor function, such as bobbing, weaving, and