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The Zephyr, Vol. 3, No. 9, September 1926
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The Zephyr, Vol. 3, No. 9, September 1926 - Image 1. September 1926. Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries. University of Houston Digital Library. Web. December 9, 2021. https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/2007_023/item/2674/show/2672.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

(September 1926). The Zephyr, Vol. 3, No. 9, September 1926 - Image 1. Outdoor Nature Club Newsletters. Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries. Retrieved from https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/2007_023/item/2674/show/2672

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

The Zephyr, Vol. 3, No. 9, September 1926 - Image 1, September 1926, Outdoor Nature Club Newsletters, Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries, accessed December 9, 2021, https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/2007_023/item/2674/show/2672.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

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Compound Item Description
Title The Zephyr, Vol. 3, No. 9, September 1926
Contributor (Local)
  • Heiser, Joseph M., Jr.
Publisher Outdoor Nature Club
Date September 1926
Subject.Topical (LCSH)
  • Ornithology
Subject.Geographic (TGN)
  • Houston, Texas
Genre (AAT)
  • newsletters
  • periodicals
Language English
Type (DCMI)
  • Text
Original Item Location ID 2007-023, Box 14, Folder 29
ArchivesSpace URI /repositories/2/archival_objects/9624
Original Collection Outdoor Nature Club Records
Digital Collection Outdoor Nature Club Newsletters
Digital Collection URL http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/2007_023
Repository Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries
Repository URL http://libraries.uh.edu/branches/special-collections/
Use and Reproduction No Copyright - United States
File Name index.cpd
Item Description
Title Image 1
Format (IMT)
  • image/jpeg
File Name uhlib_2007_023_b014_f029_009_001.jpg
Transcript THE ZEPHYR Monthly Bulletin of the Outdoor Nature Club of Houston, Texas, September, 1926 Vol. 3, No. A placid lake, a flowing stream, A rustic hut beneath the pines; Where mossy branches shade the beam And grapes and tangy muscadines And white magnolias gleam Amid the leaves. No jarring sound Mars Nature's calmly restful mood. Like bearded sages gathered round, The ancient oaks in quiet brood O'er Nature's guarded ground. It is now a universally accepted principle that the natural resources of America are the property and heritage of the whole people, not of a single generation, n§£ of a particular group or class of citizens. While all share in the responsibility as custodians of this national treasure, and all have equal rights in its wise and economical use, there are numerous divisions of our national wealth for each of which a certain type or group of citizens must be held particularly accountable. ' For instance, the sportsman, though not having sole dominion over the wild life of America, has from the beginning drawn heavily upon the teeming wealth of our woods and waters, and so he is liable in heavy measure for the perpetuation of this part of our natural resources. Whether or not he fully discharged this duty in the pa3t is no longer a matter of importance* The sportsman is awake now, and is taking on his share of the burden. But what about the wild flowers, and ornamental trees and shrubs? If the sportsmen chiefly are responsible for the game birds, animals and fishes, then surely the women bear a correspondingly heavy responsibility in regard to those wilderness assets that affect our happiness and welfare in an esthetic sense. The women of America have done splendid work in every field of conservation except that one that lies nearest their own doors. If the snowy robe of the dogwood disappears from our spring woodlands; if the gentian, the lady-slipper and the arbutus bloom no more; if the gleaming, symbolic ftnerican holly follows the passenger pigeon into the mists of oblivion - then upon the women must fall the blame, for theirs are the eager hands that gather in the dogwood's alluring liveliness, theirs the eyes that delight to gaze upon Yuletide wreaths and holly boughs draped in elaborate display* Whether the garlands and bouquets that add charm to the home shall in the future be gathered from our gardens or torn from the unprotected woodland, It is up to the women to say. Already many representative groups of American women have taken a definite stand in favor of saving the wilderness beauties, a statement Issued by the Daughters of the American Revolution being particularly noteworthy. But there is need of general, concerted action everywhere, if much good is to be accomplished. Judging from past experience, lovers of nature have no doubt that such action will soon be forthcoming, and that the women of Texas, of the South, and of America, will continue to lead the way on the upward path of conservation. i